#1
Hello

When I hit my open low e string, it buzzes (after I changed all strings)
Does anyone know why this happens and how to fix it?

Only the low e string buzzes and it only buzzes when I play the open string. It doesn't buzz if I push down any frets.

Thanks for reading
#3
Yes I bought the same brand (Ernie Ball and gauge 0,010)
Is it possible that the original strings when the guitar came out of the factory were 0,009 because I never did a proper set up of the guitar because I am too afraid I break the guitar in some way.
#4
Quote by deathroman13
Yes I bought the same brand (Ernie Ball and gauge 0,010)
Is it possible that the original strings when the guitar came out of the factory were 0,009 because I never did a proper set up of the guitar because I am too afraid I break the guitar in some way.


Check the truss rod and the nut. Probably one of them, or even both, need to be adjusted or properly cut, respectively.

It's probably worth checking the frets too.

What is the tuning on your guitar btw?

Anyway, since you didn't do a proper set up, there's your problem... if you read the sticky post about setting up a guitar on this forum, be careful and just use common sense, you won't break anything. Do a proper setup and see if the problem still persists.
Last edited by DanyFS at Feb 24, 2016,
#5
I use E-standard tuning.

Yeah I should probably have my guitar set up.
I'll read the sticky post.
#6
You have a low nut slot .

Take an extra guitar string you have lying around. Put an almost microscopic amount of superglue on it and dab a tiny tiny amount into the nut . It's better to use not enough than too much. All it takes is like not even one fourth of a drop. If you put too much in it it's still not a big deal because you can use your guitar string as a file.

You can look upon you toob baking soda superglue guitar nut and there's guys there showing how to fix the nut slots with mixing baking soda with superglue to make paste .

I've used this trick without the baking soda a few times and it's always worked for me I told other people about it and it's worked for them.

Your graphite nut will be coated with superglue in the slot you operated. If you still want graphite take a pencil and rub it in the slot until the slot is black.
Be extremely careful to get the superglue just in the nut slot. This is important because if you ever need to have the nut taken out and you get some superglue into the woods of the fingerboard it could be a big mess trying to extract the nnut . But really it's a super easy operation.
Last edited by yope at Feb 25, 2016,
#7
Quote by yope
You have a low nut slot .

You can look upon you toob baking soda superglue guitar nut and there's guys there showing how to fix the nut slots with mixing baking soda with superglue to make paste .

I've used this trick without the baking soda a few times and it's always worked for me I told other people about it and it's worked for them.



I saw a similar video where the gentleman spoke of the super glue/baking soda method but he preferred to take a celluloid guitar pick and rub the edge on a piece of sandpaper and the use the resulting dust with the super glue to make his paste, he filled the slot entirely (or at least mostly) by adding paste in layers and letting it dry in between then recut the slot.
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#8
Quote by Evilnine
I saw a similar video where the gentleman spoke of the super glue/baking soda method but he preferred to take a celluloid guitar pick and rub the edge on a piece of sandpaper and the use the resulting dust with the super glue to make his paste, he filled the slot entirely (or at least mostly) by adding paste in layers and letting it dry in between then recut the slot.

yes if you have skills. My method is for very quick fix by an idiot. Most likely a thin film of superglue will raise the offending string enough. It only needs to be raised a thousands or two. Will it affect the intonation? Anything is possible but I would say probably not.
I think you may be closer to perfection using the quick fix unless you are highly skilled.

Again I can't stress enough how little you use. Just a film on the end of a high E string and apply superglue to slot using the end of the E string as a brush . If it's not enough you can always go back and add a little more.
Last edited by yope at Feb 25, 2016,
#9
yope Sir, I would just like to thank you for your advice!

I had an open string buzz on my D string, and after following your instructions (with just super glue), the problem has been resolved, and saved me some bucks, as I thought I would have to replace the nut.
Thank you so much for sharing this! It works!

Marko
#10
It could be any combination of 3 things.  The nut could be cut too deep which would mean you need to either replace the nut or fill the low E slot with some superglue and then re file it.  The relief could be wrong which would require a truss rod adjustment.  If the string is hitting frets 2-7 then it's too tight and if it's hitting above the 7th fret then it too loose.  Trouble is, it can be difficult to figure out where the string is hitting so you may need to adjust one way and see how it performs and if it gets worse go the other way instead.  Finally your action on that string might be too low meaning you need to raise the saddle for your low E.  Like I said before it could be a combination of issues so fixing 1 thing might not get rid of the buzz.  You might need to fix multiple things in order to eliminate all the buzz. 
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