#1
This is an 8 seconds excerpt of King Crimson's "Larks' Tongues In Aspic, Part 1", an alternative version from the 40th Anni Edition, although this same fragment can be heard (softer) in the original version.

I heard Robert Fripp playing this live, so I'm sure it's only one guitar and the only effect is distortion.

You can hear two sort of "melodies" playing at once, one higher (the notes are G, B, D, F) and one lower (I think B and Bb). Something like this, over and over again:

e|-------------13----------|
B|-------12-15-------15----|
G|-12-12----------------12-|
D|-------------------------|
A|-14-14-------13-13-------|
E|-------------------------|


But I can't figure out how is he playing this, if it's harmonics or what.

Can anyone help me?

http://we.tl/qsDe6zo7Sm
Last edited by crimson-dync at Feb 25, 2016,
#2
Could you just drop a youtube link or something? I can't get that file, and if I could, I don't really like downloading random stuff.
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#3
Quote by Kevätuhri
Could you just drop a youtube link or something? I can't get that file, and if I could, I don't really like downloading random stuff.

This is a live version, inferior quality but you can hear the thing. Between 1:10 and 1:20.

https://youtu.be/CQ-bE9Hm6s0?t=1m5s
#4
Sounds like the high notes are actually produced by natural harmonics between the 2nd and 5th frets, probably on the 3rd string. I don't know if the low notes you're hearing are actually the same guitar track or not, but I'm gonna say they're most likely not.
Q: Favourite Pink Floyd song?
A: The one where they get wicked high and play Emin and A for an hour.
#5
Quote by travislausch
Sounds like the high notes are actually produced by natural harmonics between the 2nd and 5th frets, probably on the 3rd string. I don't know if the low notes you're hearing are actually the same guitar track or not, but I'm gonna say they're most likely not.

I'm not sure. I've identified every other instrument, and the low notes are from the guitar. They are not from the bass either the violin.
#6
Pretty hard to tell, but I think one guitar is playing G triad touch harmonics (similar to how you'd play a natural harmonic, but you're not lifting you finger to generate the sound, whereas with natural harmonic, you're finger comes off at same time as you pick (more or less)

possibly...

55 44 77 44 repeated, where the 5th fret is played on the G string, and 4th and 7th frets are played on the B string. Possibly slinging in 55 55 44 (where the second 55 andd 44 are on the B string). Need to experiment also with some slight muting from the picking hand, near the bridge.

The other guitar is probably doing a rough set of sliding touching harmonics on the D string, moving from the 5th fret to 2nd fret and back, while alternate picking.

For this latter technique, lightly touch the string (shouldn't be fretted), and while picking rapidly, slide your finger along the string, without changing the pressure. This will spit out a load of different harmonics.

(Obviously distortion is involved).
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Feb 27, 2016,
#7
Quote by crimson-dync
I'm not sure. I've identified every other instrument, and the low notes are from the guitar. They are not from the bass either the violin.

I finally got a chance to listen to it with good headphones.

I've got two theories on what it is:

1) It's overtones. That's all one guitar playing one set of natural harmonics between the 2nd and 5th frets. But when you play a harmonic ANYWHERE you're gonna get overtones that'll just be notes that you'll hear slightly under the notes you're trying to play. And overtones especially come out when you have the distortion on full, as Fripp has here.

2) He's playing the line around the frets that the lower notes would be (sounds more from the timbre like he's playing them on the 3rd string rather than the 5th string), but adding pinch harmonics to them, and you're hearing the lower notes as a result of him failing to do a full pinch harmonic on every single note, which is something that's very likely if you're trying to do pinch harmonics through a whole pattern of moving 16th notes.
Q: Favourite Pink Floyd song?
A: The one where they get wicked high and play Emin and A for an hour.