#1
I have no experience with guitar shop paint jobs. The only experience I have with paint jobs is doing them myself on cars, and having paint repairs done by body shops. In both cases with cars, the paint jobs needed wet sanding and buffing to get to a mirror finish.

I'm assuming that Fender, Gibson and other manufacturers don't spend time sanding and buffing, and that their guitars come off the line with mirror finishes. Do guitar shops likewise do mirror finishes, or do theirs require work afterwards?

Thanks for any replies.
#2
Quote by Monkeyleg
I have no experience with guitar shop paint jobs. The only experience I have with paint jobs is doing them myself on cars, and having paint repairs done by body shops. In both cases with cars, the paint jobs needed wet sanding and buffing to get to a mirror finish.

I'm assuming that Fender, Gibson and other manufacturers don't spend time sanding and buffing, and that their guitars come off the line with mirror finishes. Do guitar shops likewise do mirror finishes, or do theirs require work afterwards?

Thanks for any replies.

They do spend time sanding and buffing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVU86GGV07A

Painting and finishing starts around 18 minutes.
#3
you wet sand and buff just like with a car.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#6
Of course, one upshot of this is that with a lot of guitars, you can do a lot of cosmetic work(whether repairing scratches or a full refin) using supplies from your local body shop.

As long as you can make a well-ventilated, dust-free space to work in, anyway.
#8
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^^ The finishing is probably the main reason why expensive guitars are expensive. Inexpensive guitars get a fairly decent finish, either satin of gloss, using catalysed finishes that harden very quickly (hence no curing/warehousing time) and don't get polished.


Just for clarity, expensive guitars ALSO use catalyzed finishes that harden very quickly. Taylor, for example, runs a robotic paint booth that sprays a more consistent film thickness than can be done by a human, and they're dry to dry in under 24 hours. And they do sand/polish those guitars.


I'm not sure that we could identify "inexpensive guitars" that don't get polished very easily. I know that I've seen guitars below the $200 (retail) mark that are finish sanded and inspected, so I'm not sure at what point that bit of work is neglected.
#9
Quote by Monkeyleg
I have no experience with guitar shop paint jobs. The only experience I have with paint jobs is doing them myself on cars, and having paint repairs done by body shops. In both cases with cars, the paint jobs needed wet sanding and buffing to get to a mirror finish.


Guitar paint jobs are done with the same paint as cars (for the most part). Nitrocellulose lacquer (abandoned by most of the car industry in the mid 50's, acrylic paints and modern UV-catalyzed polyester paint jobs are all handled exactly as they are in the automotive industry.

Varnished or oil-finished instruments are a special case, but few of those are run out to a mirror gloss finish.
#10
Quote by dspellman
Just for clarity, expensive guitars ALSO use catalyzed finishes that harden very quickly. Taylor, for example, runs a robotic paint booth that sprays a more consistent film thickness than can be done by a human, and they're dry to dry in under 24 hours. And they do sand/polish those guitars.


I'm not sure that we could identify "inexpensive guitars" that don't get polished very easily. I know that I've seen guitars below the $200 (retail) mark that are finish sanded and inspected, so I'm not sure at what point that bit of work is neglected.


True. The situation must be fairly clear cut with satin finishes, if not with gloss.
#11
Quote by Monkeyleg
I have no experience with guitar shop paint jobs. The only experience I have with paint jobs is doing them myself on cars, and having paint repairs done by body shops. In both cases with cars, the paint jobs needed wet sanding and buffing to get to a mirror finish.


Just thought I'd pitch in that the Composite Acoustics guitars, when painted, use automotive paint! At least that's what the dealer told me.