#1
It's been awhile since i was active here but i remember that these forums are one of the best in my eyes, so to the problem...

A while ago i won a Jackson CBX bass (David ellefson signature bass?) and it just feels and sounds great. The only thing is that the string height is a bit high for my preference... so i lowered it down at the bridge and managed to lower it as much as it could go. But it's still very high...

Any ideas what i should try or could do to lower the strings more?

Cheers
Progboxxer
#2
Check the neck relief. Too much front bow and the action will be high. The easiest way to check is to lay the bass flat and slide a quarter under the E or G strings resting on the 12th fret. If there is extra space between the quarter and the string, there is probably too much relief. If you have access to a Capo and "feeler gauges", you can check more precisely by clamping the Capo on the 1st fret and pressing the string down with a finger at the 17th fret. Slide a .010 feeler gauge under the string at the 7th fret and see if there is still additional space.

To reduce neck relief (to straighten the neck when it has front bow) you must tighten the truss rod. If you are unsure about any of this, take it to your local guitar shop and have them look at it.
#3
If you do attempt adjust the truss rod remember to take the tension from the strings before you do and remember one quarter turn at a time.
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#4
Quote by John Swift
If you do attempt adjust the truss rod remember to take the tension from the strings before you do and remember one quarter turn at a time.


There's no need to loosen the strings to adjust the truss rod. Unless you have one of those basses where you need to take the neck off to adjust the truss rod.

About the one quarter at a time, you're totally right.
Last edited by DanyFS at Feb 29, 2016,
#5
^ Yeah. There's no point in being afraid of truss rod adjustment. It's one of the most basic adjustments and your neck relief is what creates most of the action/fret buzz problems (because your neck relief changes pretty easily because of humidity and temperature changes). People say you need to be careful with it. And that's true. But you should be careful with any adjustments you do. So turn the truss rod a bit and then check the neck relief again. Remember to tune your instrument before that. When you adjust the neck, it will also change your tuning. And your tuning also has an effect on your neck relief.

People will say that touching the truss rod will destroy everything, but that's just not true. If you overdo it, of course it will break. But you can't do it by accident.

So yeah, check your neck relief.

And in the future, before touching your bridge, check your neck relief first. The action on the bridge is most likely just fine, and it won't change unless you change it. But your neck relief changes all the time because of temperature and humidity changes (unless you keep your guitar in the same place all the time and make sure the temperature and humidity don't change).


I would say never do any adjustments before figuring out what causes the problem. Because just starting to do adjustments is an easy way of screwing everything up.

Always check your neck relief first. If it is fine, it is not what causes the problem. (But in this case I'm almost completely sure it is causing the problem.) Why should you check it first? Because neck relief has an effect on your action. No matter what you do with your bridge, the string height will change when you change the neck relief. And also, as I said, neck relief is what is causing most of the action/fret buzz problems.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Feb 29, 2016,
#6
Quote by DanyFS
There's no need to loosen the strings to adjust the truss rod. Unless you have one of those basses where you need to take the neck off to adjust the truss rod.

About the one quarter at a time, you're totally right.


I sincerely hope the nobody takes any notice of you regarding not loosening the strings when adjusting the truss rod.
Loosening the strings is particularly important when taking out inward bow, if you don't you're working against the tension of the strings as well as the tension on the neck.
Another point is that you have to retune the bass anyway.
Truss rods have been known to break when adjustments are attempted incorrectly.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#7
Thanks everyone for all the answers. I'll try to loosen the strings and adjust the truss rod, "one quarter turn" at a time. as John Swift said sounds good.
Progboxxer
#8
Before you adjust the truss rod you should measure the relief and see if it actually needs adjusted. Do this by putting a capo on the 1st fret and then pushing the strings down on the fret where the neck meets the body and then check the distance between the top of the 7th fret and the bottom of the string. Only tighten the truss rod if you think the gap is too big. If there is a very small or no gap then you don't want to tighten the truss rod. If you do tighten the truss rod and then you get buzz that could mean you went too far but, it could also mean that you need to readjust the action to compensate for the fact that the truss rod is now set different. Because you have to balance different factors it can be easy to make thins worse rather than better so go slow and always count the number of turns made to both the truss rod and the adjustable saddles. Also keep in minds that changing the action and neck relief will mean you need to adjust intonation as well.
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