#1
Hey guys i got this cool little chord progession i like. it goes D A E A. I know this is in A major key but i was wondering what was some cool things i could work with to expand with. Maybe to put a melody over it or just cool thing i could do. I was also wondering what scales is could use. I think A major and F# minor pentatonics worls pretty good but im really wanting to learn more and how to make something more interesting. Any ideas would be helpful or corrections i love to come here to learn!
#2
Solid progression.

It's such a solid progression that the options are limitless, it's hard to even know where to start to give you some cool things to do with it.
Si
#3
This is more of theory question here but A major relative minor is F# minor. I dont get that a major pentatonic and it relative minor is the same exact scale in the same position with the same notes. Both on the 2nd fret. How would i give a minor sound over this if its the same thing?

If this is completely wrong im sorry
Last edited by mattousley at Feb 29, 2016,
#4
Quote by mattousley
This is more of theory question here but A major relative minor is F# minor. I dont get that a major pentatonic and it relative minor is the same exact scale in the same position with the same notes. Both on the 2nd fret. How would i give a minor sound over this if its the same thing?

Your progression is solid major, so you can't get a "minor sound" over that. The chords rule!
If you want a minor sound, start with different chords. Minor ones ideally!

That doesn't mean you can't give your D-A-E-A progression some more subtlety or expression. If you know your A major scale, you can try adding other notes from the scale to each chord.
If you don't know the scale, just try adding a note or two from one of the other chords. The whole scale is there in the chord shapes! Just use your ear to decide which notes sound good and which don't.

OTOH, you could make the whole thing sound bluesy by using the A minor pent scale on all of it. That's not exactly a "minor sound" - because the key and chords are still major - but the contrast produces the familiar "blues" sound.
Last edited by jongtr at Feb 29, 2016,
#5
^What he said. A is the tonic.

So really you want A scales

A Major
A Major pentatonic
A minor pentatonic
A blues
A mixolydian
A dorian.

Those scales can be utilized for melodic ideas. Some of them will have some conflicting notes with the underlying chords if not used properly.
Si