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#1
Any science majors out there?
And if so, why?
WHY?!
Current sophomore neuroscience major rethinking my whole life. Research is boring and I don't wanna be a doctor.
Inspire me?
For those who aren't science majors: why do you do hard things? What's the point? You feel accomplished for a few seconds and somebody pats your dick and then it's back to stressing over the next thing. WHY?!
#2
because they feel good deep inside
A poem.
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I can out-bore you any day
#3
Phrasing.

I was thinking about going into neuroscience, too, with a focus on medicine, but decided I can't be bothered with all of that effort. I mean, I'd enjoy it, but work though.
Free Ali
#4
Quote by chrismendiola
Phrasing.

I was thinking about going into neuroscience, too, with a focus on medicine, but decided I can't be bothered with all of that effort. I mean, I'd enjoy it, but work though.

That's pretty much my entire career choices.....I could totally go and study law, but effort
Come back if you want to
And remember who you are
‘Cause there's nothing here for you my dear
And everything must pass
#5
idk money
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#6
thats pretty much what i wanna do

so far the plan is to medicate the fuck out of my way through all this school shit, neuroscience/pharmacology style
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#9
Quote by TheChaz
Money.

But like, why do we make ourselves unhappy for more money?
Come back if you want to
And remember who you are
‘Cause there's nothing here for you my dear
And everything must pass
#10
Quote by i_lovemetallica
But like, why do we make ourselves unhappy for more money?

Because we believe money will make us happier.
#11
Quote by i_lovemetallica
But like, why do we make ourselves unhappy for more money?

it's the rules
#12
Challenging tasks stimulate my brain and make me feel accomplished when I do them.

An "easy" job like working in retail all day is far less satisfying than solving a challenging problem.

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#13
Quote by Pastafarian96
because they feel good deep inside


soft squishy things can feel good too though
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#17
Quote by stratdud39
Any science majors out there?
And if so, why?
WHY?!
Current sophomore neuroscience major rethinking my whole life. Research is boring and I don't wanna be a doctor.
Inspire me?
For those who aren't science majors: why do you do hard things? What's the point? You feel accomplished for a few seconds and somebody pats your dick and then it's back to stressing over the next thing. WHY?!



Started off a Mechanical Engineering major, but swapped to Biology. I thought biology was FAR easier. Just pick a different STEM area, you might find it more to your liking.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#18
inb4 stemlord circlejerk
Quote by JustRooster
That's a shamanic incantation of truth if I ever heard one.
#19
Quote by Aeolian Harmony
inb4 stemlord circlejerk


The hardest part about having a STEM degree is having to hear people give you their reasons they didn't "need to go to college," that you didn't invite.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#20
Quote by JustRooster
The hardest part about having a STEM degree is having to hear people give you their reasons they didn't "need to go to college," that you didn't invite.


Doubly weird when you have one STEM degree and one non-STEM degree and the best jobs for a hundred miles require a thorough understanding of acetylene torches.
#22
Yeah, I will shortly. I'm waiting to hear from graduate programs so I can double-down on the awkward conversations.
#23
Quote by Aeolian Harmony
Yeah, I will shortly. I'm waiting to hear from graduate programs so I can double-down on the awkward conversations.


My wife keeps pressuring me to look at graduate school, but I haven't really found any programs that I can do while still working a full time schedule. Shit's lame.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#24
That's true. I passed on entering this past semester because I'd be turned down for research assistant/teaching assistant positions.

I know I'll be poor but food and a tent would be nice.
#26
As a current applied physics graduate student, my personal answer is that you do it because you genuinely enjoy it. Sure, it is very challenging at times, and sometimes the experience is unsatisfying when you spend months trying to solve a problem just to make no measurable progress.

I think, at least for me, the times when you are able to present an entirely new idea that actually works truly make up for the struggles that you experience along the way. It's just so incredibly rewarding to know that you are the first person to have ever observed/produced whatever your research project is on. While the research that most graduate students do never make a huge impact on the scientific community, the point is more that they feel personal gratification from making a contribution to our collective scientific knowledge, regardless of how large or how small.

It is my personal opinion that if you feel enjoyment from physically "doing science," then you are probably in the right place. Passing judgment on a field from a pure coursework perspective doesn't really give you complete insight; however, I think that if you do not find the concepts and ideas from your courses to be intellectually stimulating (aside from the associated workload), then maybe you should consider broadening your horizons and considering alternative fields.

In response to many of the previous answers, I don't think that money is much of a motivator for people to go into science. Having done undergrad in engineering, it was always my opinion that people would wanted to make serious money would go into finance or professional school instead of pursuing STEM majors. Most engineers make decent money, but it's usually not comparable to a surgeon, for example.
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#27
Quote by javiero

In response to many of the previous answers, I don't think that money is much of a motivator for people to go into science. Having done undergrad in engineering, it was always my opinion that people would wanted to make serious money would go into finance or professional school instead of pursuing STEM majors. Most engineers make decent money, but it's usually not comparable to a surgeon, for example.

Seriously? My university recommends STEM fields for the highest salary. Granted, things are different here in south africa, but most of my fellow science students are strongly motivated by money. Especially computer science, a guy at my university started doing small software projects in his first year for extra money. He made enough to pay for his degree, up until Honours. And we wouldn't describe an engineer's salary as "decent". More like "jaw dropping". But anyway, one of the first things I was told was "If you're looking to learn about science, you've come to the right place. If you want a massive salary, you've come to the right place. If you expect to socialize or sleep properly for the next three years, then you are in the wrong place".
#28
Quote by GFraser
Seriously? My university recommends STEM fields for the highest salary. Granted, things are different here in south africa, but most of my fellow science students are strongly motivated by money. Especially computer science, a guy at my university started doing small software projects in his first year for extra money. He made enough to pay for his degree, up until Honours. And we wouldn't describe an engineer's salary as "decent". More like "jaw dropping". But anyway, one of the first things I was told was "If you're looking to learn about science, you've come to the right place. If you want a massive salary, you've come to the right place. If you expect to socialize or sleep properly for the next three years, then you are in the wrong place".


Sounds like he failed with his work life balance what a #scrub

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#29
I was a bio major, specializing in biomedical science. I picked biology because I've always loved science but especially biology. However, I worked in a few chemical engineering labs during undergrad and I found the work they were doing far easier than the biology labs I worked in, which is interesting because biology is typically thought of as being one of the easier STEM fields but it wasn't like that for me. I struggled so much for the first 2 years and then by the time I got the hang of it, it was almost over. I definitely don't regret choosing biology though because I enjoyed learning about it. I still wish I could go back to some of my undergrad classes and continue my research projects haha.

I didn't want to go into research in undergrad because of seeing my dad struggle with it (he is in academia) and it was hard to find STEM jobs with just a bachelor's degree in biology, let alone jobs with decent pay. I am in grad school now for speech-language pathology and all of a sudden I want to do research. I don't care that I barely have a social life or anything because I love what I'm doing so much that I don't need distractions from it. It's really difficult, but I like it enough not to care that I have to expend extra effort and I like that I can help people in significant ways after finishing my program.


Trust me, sometimes I feel like I want to be an aristocrat in the 1900s so I won't be expected to do anything besides marry a rich dude and read and learn languages and play music and take long baths and stuff. But when I start feeling like that I know it's time to take a break from whatever I'm doing - it's not because I despise my work so much that I want to get away from it all.
cat
#31
Quote by guitarxo
I was a bio major, specializing in biomedical science. I picked biology because I've always loved science but especially biology. However, I worked in a few chemical engineering labs during undergrad and I found the work they were doing far easier than the biology labs I worked in, which is interesting because biology is typically thought of as being one of the easier STEM fields but it wasn't like that for me. I struggled so much for the first 2 years and then by the time I got the hang of it, it was almost over. I definitely don't regret choosing biology though because I enjoyed learning about it. I still wish I could go back to some of my undergrad classes and continue my research projects haha.

I didn't want to go into research in undergrad because of seeing my dad struggle with it (he is in academia) and it was hard to find STEM jobs with just a bachelor's degree in biology, let alone jobs with decent pay. I am in grad school now for speech-language pathology and all of a sudden I want to do research. I don't care that I barely have a social life or anything because I love what I'm doing so much that I don't need distractions from it. It's really difficult, but I like it enough not to care that I have to expend extra effort and I like that I can help people in significant ways after finishing my program.


Trust me, sometimes I feel like I want to be an aristocrat in the 1900s so I won't be expected to do anything besides marry a rich dude and read and learn languages and play music and take long baths and stuff. But when I start feeling like that I know it's time to take a break from whatever I'm doing - it's not because I despise my work so much that I want to get away from it all.

People who think biology is easy have no exposure to the subject beyond early high school. Or they did physics and lack the intellectual security to admit that other disciplines have challenges to offer.

Hell, when whatshisface figured out that haemoglobin was - to paraphrase - "fucking massive, like 60,000 Daltons, I'm not even kidding guiz", pretty much the entire scientific community was - again, to paraphrase - "lol, u cray. Check again 2moz when ur not blazin 420".
#33
Quote by chrismendiola
Phrasing.

I was thinking about going into neuroscience, too, with a focus on medicine, but decided I can't be bothered with all of that effort. I mean, I'd enjoy it, but work though.

Really? You're thinking about locating the hippocampus, but you can't identify Indiana on a map?
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#34
Almost finished my research, but the last 4 years feel like a waste. I have really hated the last two years of my PhD in medicinal chemistry. I hate the faculty, my PI's the more than useless industrial sponsor and everyone at this institution. I cant wait to see the back of it.

I chose to do a PhD because I loved the idea of research. Now I loathe it.
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#35
To see if we can. Because a life of doing only easy things is highly unrewarding.
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#36
I find it gives things value, and makes things worth it. I enjoy the sense of accomplishment as well. But I would not do things simply because they are difficult. There would need to be some other incentive there for me. For instance, I, like you, and not particularly interested in an academic career. I actually do enjoy learning a lot of that stuff, but I don't want to spend my life behind a beaker, or doing paperwork and things like that. I think in this day and age science is too specialized and requires too elaborate of experiments for me to be interested in that sort of career.

I also don't find things need to necessarily be "difficult" in and of themselves to be very rewarding, but perhaps time consuming, which I guess can be similar. For instance, I think basically anyone could learn how to construct a house. But there are lots of little details you need to learn about, and experience with all the tools, and materials and all that, and becoming a decent construction worker would definitely take some time. Building a house would also take some time, but I find that would be really rewarding, so that counts. I would have a house at the end of it, and I could look at it and say to myself, "I did that". I like that. I like trying to become better and better at things, and trying to improve constantly, and I like the sense of accomplishment of achieving what I couldn't achieve before, or just creating something I'm proud of.

So, guitar is great for me that way. It is endless, I will never fully master it, and I can make music that I can be proud of. Some times more than others . But you know, it's a learning process, and I think that's cool about it.

I am not so excited by something that is easy, or kind of doesn't result in a creation, I guess. I guess that's maybe kind of narcissistic, but idk, I like to try and grow and learn about things, and I like to be able to get tangible results, because that gives me a sense of accomplishment, or horrifies me because I find it's not so great, and that inspires me to try harder for the next one, and learn from my mistakes.

If I don't see tangible results of progress and growth, I lose a sense of accomplishment, and if something is too easy, then you can get to a point where it's really hard to grow more and improve, and then that sense of accomplishment for me goes away.

For school, I think you shouldn't do difficult school stuff because it is difficult. I think you should try and find what you want to do with your days, and then do whatever school that takes, no matter how hard or easy it is. For example, movie making school is probably not really all of that difficult, not in the way quantum physics is, but you could take it to heights of being one of the top movie directors, and continue pushing the envelope making new types of movies, and learning new styles, using new technologies, all sorts of stuff. But it takes a lot of time and experience to know how lighting works with cameras, and what angles to use at what times, and all kinds of stuff like that, so it's not "easy" either. And making a movie takes a while, and then at the end you can look at it, and be proud of it, or look at ways to be better, and stuff like that. If I make something and it was easy, then whatever, it's not really all that important to me, it doesn't have the same value to me.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Feb 29, 2016,
#37
Quote by Pastafarian96
because they feel good deep inside

and even sort of like rubbing against the surface as long as it's not too rough
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#38
Bullshit answer: I really want to challenge myself and become better

Real answer: I want to seem like a bigshot
#39
We make ourselves suffer to distract ourselves from death
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#40
Quote by Banjocal
We make ourselves suffer to distract ourselves from death



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