#1
i have three guitars, a gibson les paul standard 09', mexican tele 11', and an ibanez RG550 95'.
the question came to mind after realising that probably the ibanez feels the best in resonant qualities, how it vibrates when played, and how it comes out of an amp. it's very "defined" and "crunchy", nothing to do with some special pickups, all stock.
is it because in the first place the woods selected for the guitar were "better"?
or as a result of years and years of playing it affected the wood's fibers inner structure, and the effect of wood drying over time?
#2



But seriously, it could be any number of things that have nothing to do with the wood at all. In terms of things that actually matter when it comes to electric guitars, how wood resonates is more or less on the bottom of the list. There are simply far greater contributing factors to the way the guitar sounds.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#4
it would be hard to find a luthier that wouldn't agree that old growth wood makes a better instrument.

that said, i think it would be impossible to attribute any single thing about tone directly to the wood. and i'd wager most luthiers would agree with that statement.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#5
Quote by gania13
i have three guitars, a gibson les paul standard 09', mexican tele 11', and an ibanez RG550 95'.
the question came to mind after realising that probably the ibanez feels the best in resonant qualities, how it vibrates when played, and how it comes out of an amp. it's very "defined" and "crunchy", nothing to do with some special pickups, all stock.
is it because in the first place the woods selected for the guitar were "better"?
or as a result of years and years of playing it affected the wood's fibers inner structure, and the effect of wood drying over time?


certainly guitars age and dry up. finishes finally settle in, wood matures, humidity this and humidity that, etc... but honestly if a guitar made in 95' is your only metric, you need to experience far older guitars to truly have a better idea of what this may mean to you.

regarding your ibanez, "imo" your floating trem has a fair amount to do with your tone on that one.
Last edited by ad_works at Feb 29, 2016,
#6
Quote by gregs1020
it would be hard to find a luthier that wouldn't agree that old growth wood makes a better instrument.

that said, i think it would be impossible to attribute any single thing about tone directly to the wood. and i'd wager most luthiers would agree with that statement.


as a builder, on this i'll say that the primary wood factors regarding un-amplified tone and timbre with modern electrics are the wood species used throughout and the construction methods. the type of wood sets the character.

type and style of hardware -bridge esp., also have their part in dealing with string energy.

the pickups & electronics process the resonant frequencies that pass through that wood, construction and hardware combination.

with acoustics it's a much more involved subject.

somehow i see a giant UG C-F**K on the horizon....
Last edited by ad_works at Feb 29, 2016,
#7
Good place to end this one. Thanks for keeping it civil, folks.

OP: plenty of resources on this if you search. A poorly researched, vague thread like this usually ends in pointless argument.