#1
New to guitar. Quit my job as a banker (f*ck that shit), I'm 28 years old, looking to dedicate my life to music.

Love metal, rock, fast and heavy/hard stuff. I need some gear and need to learn how to play (lessons?).

What kind of gear do I need? Guitar, pedals, etc? I'm a total newb and know nothing about what to buy.

I see there's this website for www.neoclassicalrevelation.com. Do any of you have any experience with this guy? Is that site legit? Or should I go find a teacher I can see and interact with in person?

Hope this wasn't too many questions. Thanks guys!
#4
Didn't mean I was going to sit around and jerk off all day. When I mean quit I mean get out of the banking industry. 80 hour weeks are over.

Thanks man, I'll start looking for a teacher.
#5
Dude he's right get another day job. Learning music is a grind and takes a lot of time and almost never pay off.

I have a friend who's band had a #2 cbc(Canadian broadcasting Corp.) hit, toured Canada and USA and really has absolutely nothing except memories to show for it.

I don't want to discourage you but most don't make much. Even my guitar teacher Brian Sim of the 5 man electric band is in 3 bands and earns a living teaching. It's a tough gig man.

Do it but your going to need other income is all I'm trying to tell you.
song stuck in my head today


#6
Quote by Jokerxxxxx
Didn't mean I was going to sit around and jerk off all day. When I mean quit I mean get out of the banking industry. 80 hour weeks are over.

Thanks man, I'll start looking for a teacher.
As the others say, get another day job, or starve. Or have some kind of private income, or move back with your folks, or - if you're married - live off your wife's earnings. Or get into some kind of lucrative criminal activity... (Oh yeah I forgot, you're quitting banking... )

Don't bank (haha) on making a living as a musician, at least not for many years of hard work and serious commitment. (Check out how long it took Guthrie Govan to get to where he is now.) Giving up banking is quite understandable, but guitar-playing is not an alternative career.

The world needs another guitar-player even less than it needs another banker. Which is not to say the world isn't a better place when a banker decides to become a musician.

Sorry if I'm overstating the point... Treat guitar-playing as an enthralling new hobby (as if you were taking up a spare-time sport of some kind), and you won't go wrong. Good luck!
#7
You know...if you're starting with guitar,you should begin with an acoustic guitar.It is fine that Govan is your inspiration,but to tell you the truth,you are light years to reach that level of musicality and technique.If you really love the music what I said won't dissapoint you,you only have to practice,practice,practice and practice.Music is beautiful,you have to enjoy it first to be able to become a great musician.
#8
Quote by Jokerxxxxx
I need some gear and need to learn how to play (lessons?).

What kind of gear do I need? Guitar, pedals, etc? I'm a total newb and know nothing about what to buy.
Thanks guys!


If you have the budget and a space to play loudly :

1) get a good combo tube amp - Mesa Boogie or better - your tone is almost entirely coming from the amp, not pedals and not even the guitar. A 30 watt tube amp is way more than loud enough for any situation, so don't get fooled into buying a 100 watt amp unless you really dig the tone.

2) get a guitar that suits your intended style of playing, but make sure you get it setup by a tech immediately after buying. Research how to change strings properly ( you tube has great tutorials on this), otherwise your guitar will be drifting out of tune constantly, which will make learning much more difficult. Strings on an electric guitar should be changed once a month at the least.

3) pedals - as a beginner you won't need much if you buy a good amp to start. A delay can help make leads more interesting in metal, but it's not necessary per say.


If you don't have the budget or space to play loudly( i.e you live in an apartment):

1) buy a small digital practice amp - Roland Micro Cube, Yamaha THR etc. or something you can use with headphones. This will give you much better results in a small room at low levels than any other type of amp because they push zero bass and that it what annoys the neighbors.

2) don't buy pedals for use with those digital amps, the have effects built in and sound terrible with pedals in any event.


If you want to be great, you need to practice 2 to 4 hours per day, ignore anyone that tells you 1 hour or less per day is enough, it's not unless all you want to do is play campfire songs. You'll be playing some advanced material within about a year. For metal etc. I suggest starting with early Sabbath ( Paranoid album) , Iron Maiden, and Metallica - they are all much easier than the more modern bands and it's a great place to start for leads.
Last edited by reverb66 at Mar 3, 2016,
#9
Quote by frecebutmito
You know...if you're starting with guitar,you should begin with an acoustic guitar.It is fine that Govan is your inspiration,but to tell you the truth,you are light years to reach that level of musicality and technique.If you really love the music what I said won't dissapoint you,you only have to practice,practice,practice and practice.Music is beautiful,you have to enjoy it first to be able to become a great musician.

I don't agree with the acoustic guitar thing. If you want to play electric, play electric. Playing acoustic won't motivate you if that's not what you want to do. The important thing when practicing on electric is not using noisy distortion sound to mask your mistakes.

Acoustic and electric are a bit different and you'll learn electric best if you play electric.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I don't agree with the acoustic guitar thing. If you want to play electric, play electric. Playing acoustic won't motivate you if that's not what you want to do. The important thing when practicing on electric is not using noisy distortion sound to mask your mistakes.

Acoustic and electric are a bit different and you'll learn electric best if you play electric.


I agree with this - get an electric and stay motivated - acoustic guitar provides zero real benefit and will demotivate you if that's not what you're into. The art of playing electric guitar is playing it in tune - i.e. not applying too much pressure when fretting notes. Acoustic guitars are much too forgiving when it comes to that, which is why acoustic players tend to sound atrocious when playing electric at the start.
#11
I agree with everyone else about getting another day job. Even if it's a "hey, stupid" retail job where you'd have some income, it's better than nothing. Even then, you stated that you are new to guitar, need lessons, and have no means to make money off of it (plus, judging by your join date and previous posts from 2007, you have some minor experience). If you expect to make money from playing, it'll be awhile since you're a complete beginner. Even my teacher, who is also in a big jazz band, makes his living off of teaching. You have to dedicate time to playing on top of working.

The best thing to do is get a one-on-one teacher that you meet in person. They can help you correct technique and give you guidance on how to improve yourself. As my teacher tells me, he teaches me enough info in lessons to where I go out out and teach myself in my own practice. Luckily, for me, I was already playing pretty for awhile for taking lessons from him, so we've been pretty much refining my skills and giving me some direction.


For gear, I suggest following reverb's advice a few posts up. If you decide to go towards the tube amp route, it is also possible to get an attenuator (device that goes between amp's output and speaker) to bring the volumes down to more reasonable levels. If not, get a modelling amp like a Roland Cube or Peavey Vypyr for the time being. Guitar-wise, try out a few at your local
Skip the username, call me Billy
#12
Thanks guys for the awesome responses!

Yes, join date was back in 2007, when I was back in school. Fiddled for like weeks at a time, never took it seriously, never took lessons, life got in the way, etc. Never was really even a hobby. Now I'm ready to make a go at it.

Not even looking to become the next greatest thing or make millions, I just want to live in the moment and enjoy getting better every day. A lot of people go out to bars after a hard day's work, I want to play music. Eventually I'll get good.

Thanks again for the advice, take care
Last edited by Jokerxxxxx at Mar 3, 2016,
#13
Gear really depends on what you are doing. I downgraded a 50 watt tube combo to a 15 watt tube preamp combo valvetronic because It was just too much for what I needed.

The valvetronic also came with 20 or so different amp models and a few fx I never touch. Going this way is cost effective and can get you exposed to many different sounds. Not a gig worthy amp even at the 50 watt level but solid practice amp.

Don't spurge on your first guitar their are many subtlies in guitar that change comfort levels from scale length to neck, thickness, weight, strong response body resonance.

I highly recommend not buying a pro level until your sure and you get better at guitar. Research the type of guitars and music you want to play. I have a strat(fender) which is godly but it cost an arm and a leg and wouldn't hold up to heavy distortions very well.

Even when comparing strats to strats in the guitar store, they may look similar but different in so many ways each guitar. You will learn what you like over time. Don't like something cause it's a nice guitar or someone else does. Always follow your feeling with instruments.
song stuck in my head today


#14
Yeah, amplifier usage can greatly vary dependent on what you're doing with them and need them for. Hell, using a modelling amp (Peavy Vypyr, Roland Cube, Fender Mustang) or something like a Line 6 Pod can be very beneficial to those who are starting out for many options.

I also agree about the guitar. The feel varies from guitar to guitar (even those that are near identical). I would suggest setting a limit of between $350-450 new and try out a couple different guitars. That way, the guitar is decent enough to resell if you ever A) fund it for another or B) not have the time for it. It'll be much better than dropping a grand on guitar, not like it/not play it, and be out a few hundred from resale.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#15
Quote by Jokerxxxxx
New to guitar. Quit my job as a banker (f*ck that shit), I'm 28 years old, looking to dedicate my life to music.

Most people will scorn you for making such a move, but I applaud you. There's nothing better than taking a risk to pursue your dreams. Of course it's already obvious that you will need something to bring in your income, but the idea is to start using the skills you possess to create another stream of income that will enable you to have more time to put into your music.

Don't listen to any discouraging advice that doubters will give you. Make a decision and follow through. Learn from your favorite artists and other people you look up to (perhaps Bill Gates as an example).

I have been reading books that have really been encouraging me and educating me and helping me move forward in my own music career. Go ahead and contact me if you want to know the title of those books!

Best of wishes to your success!
#16
Quote by Jeremy.R5544998
Most people will scorn you for making such a move, but I applaud you. There's nothing better than taking a risk to pursue your dreams. Of course it's already obvious that you will need something to bring in your income, but the idea is to start using the skills you possess to create another stream of income that will enable you to have more time to put into your music.


Gonna go out on a limb and guess that you haven't taken this risk for yourself. It's one thing to choose a lower paying job that gives you more free time, which is what a lot of professional musicians do, but it's just stupid to go full on unemployed without any musical experience and count on making rent in 30 days.
#17
Quote by reverb66
The art of playing electric guitar is playing it in tune - i.e. not applying too much pressure when fretting notes. Acoustic guitars are much too forgiving when it comes to that, which is why acoustic players tend to sound atrocious when playing electric at the start.


That's not really the case. It's more because acoustic guitars are more forgiving in terms of noise, being less sensitive and having far shorter decay and releases times (what guitar plays and other musicians often erroneously refer to as sustain despite guitars having no actual sustain in a technical sense) compared to electrics. Therefore an acoustic player gets tons of unwanted noises from even slight movements which are unnoticeable on an acoustic. These need to be addressed by more precise muting techniques.

This becomes increasingly the case and increasingly noticeable as gain (and therefore dynamic compression) increases. In fact, in the same way that you can pick out (no pun intended) an acoustic player playing an electric for the first time by excess noise, you can easily identify a clean electric player playing a hi-gain rig for the first time by further excess noise resulting from further compression (and furthered perceived sustain) of sounds on a distorted electric as compared to a clean electric.

Quote by Jeremy.R5544998
Most people will scorn you for making such a move, but I applaud you. There's nothing better than taking a risk to pursue your dreams.


What about being able to afford rent/mortgage payments so you don't get evicted/foreclosed on? Or being able to afford food and gas and bills? That all sounds much better.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#18
Quote by Jeremy.R5544998
Most people will scorn you for making such a move, but I applaud you. There's nothing better than taking a risk to pursue your dreams. Of course it's already obvious that you will need something to bring in your income, but the idea is to start using the skills you possess to create another stream of income that will enable you to have more time to put into your music.


Well, if you've read into the what he said, TS has no experience with music whatsoever. So, despite leaving his job, he can't "make a living off of music" if he can't even
play anything (let alone perform or teach). We were just advising him to get a job that paid for the time being until he could get to a level where he can make money off of music (whether it's teaching, performing, etc).
Skip the username, call me Billy
#19
Quote by aerosmithfan95
until he could get to a level where he can make money off of music (whether it's teaching, performing, etc).


Which is years out depending on how fast he can pick up both the skills and the connections to get in with people. The latter isn't a 100% necessity, but certainly a huge help. The latter also counts on the former, since meeting the right people means nothing if you don't have the skills and probably a demo right then and there.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#20
Don't get another day job.

Do it your way, as most of us do anyways.

I know of virtually no one that's ever taken another person's life advice and says, "okay I won't do that." We usually have to learn by going out there and finding out what doesn't work. Experience is the best teacher. That's why its your life...figure it out.

As for what you need? That's a tough one. I'd say you need a friend. Someone that knows guitars and knows you and that you can trust has your interests in mind. Virtually everyone knows a guitar player somewhere. Confide in them about your dreams and goals and see what they advise. Basically there's no one answer. Most people do what they want to do in the end anyways.

Best,

Sean
#21
Quote by Sean0913
Don't get another day job.


So what exactly should he do for money for the next five or so years until he has enough skill to make money doing something that he is essentially just restarting from scratch?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#22
Yeah I really don't see homelessness or utter dependence being a boon to anyone's music career. There are a lot of pro musicians who don't do it full time, and need a decent day job to keep their music gear in shape and drive to gigs. There's nothing professional about lacking transportation, steady housing, and decent music gear.
#23
Thanks for all the advice!

What do you think of the following?

Schecter omen 6
Roland micro cube

Under 500 bucks so far.

What do you recommend for pics, headphones, cables, etc.? And do these guitars usually come with straps and cases?

Was going to go down to guitar center or sweet water and check it out, but wondering if I should just order it from Amazon instead. Reviews are solid and probably cheaper than in the store. Would you ever buy stuff online or must I check it out in the store?

I really can't diddle around with it and play it to check the quality because I really don't know what I'm doing. Sill in the market for that guitar friend
#24
Micro Cube is a good choice. I haven't tried that guitar but I would guess it will work just fine.

Picks... I would buy a Dunlop variety pack that comes with different kinds of picks. Helps you with figuring out what kind of picks you like.

Do you already have headphones? Are you going to play with headphones a lot? How much are you willing to spend? Remember that Micro Cube also works at very quiet volumes.

Cables... Don't spend too much on them. Cheap cables may not last long (the ones that come with your guitar are crap) but it makes no sense to spend a fortune on them either because it just doesn't make a noticeable difference on the sound, especially if we are talking about shorter cables. I would say spend max 20 bucks on your cable.


Guitars do not usually come with cases and straps.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#25
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Guitars do not usually come with cases and straps.


Straps never unless it's one of those starter sets, but a lot of guitars come with cases or bags. It would be more accurate to say that low end guitars don't usually come with cases. But after a certain pricepoint which varies depending on the brand, most guitars tend to come with something.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#26
Quote by Jokerxxxxx
Thanks for all the advice!

What do you think of the following?

Schecter omen 6
Roland micro cube

Under 500 bucks so far.

What do you recommend for pics, headphones, cables, etc.? And do these guitars usually come with straps and cases?

Was going to go down to guitar center or sweet water and check it out, but wondering if I should just order it from Amazon instead. Reviews are solid and probably cheaper than in the store. Would you ever buy stuff online or must I check it out in the store?
I would always check out a guitar, at least, before buying.
But IMO there's not a lot that can go wrong with a solid Strat-a-like like the Schecter, which seems like a good choice for the price. If it does seem weird to play when you get it, it can be worth taking it to a tech to have it set up. It's not expensive, and will make the guitar as playable as possible.

I haven't tried a micro-cube, but I can recommend an even tinier amp I bought recently that sounds good for the price (and miniature size) - although it's not particularly versatile:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blackstar-Fly3-Mini-Amp-Watt/dp/B00PDJXGIG
It really is amazing for the size - loud and beefy, and an impressive distortion without being tinny. You can almost stick it in a pocket! I'd pretty much go along with the 5-star reviews there. (You'll notice the only 1-star review is because it "broke" on the first day. There's always one....)
Not to take away from the micro-cube, mind, which also seems to satisfy all users.
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 6, 2016,
#27
Quote by jongtr
If it does seem weird to play when you get it, it can be worth taking it to a tech to have it set up. It's not expensive, and will make the guitar as playable as possible.


In fact, if you buy the guitar in an actual store, you should probably be able to finagle a free setup into the deal.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#28
Congrats on making the decision to move into music.

My advice to you is if you want to become a better guitar player invest some money into a Digital Audio Workstation like Logic Pro, Pro Tools, or Cubase and learn home recording.

Recording your playing everyday will give you an accurate measure of whether you are actually making any progress. There's also no lying when you're recording music. You either sound like trash or not. Chances are you are going to sound like garbage at first but that's okay because that's where we all start.

Since you are a beginner you may ask yourself what do I play? The answer to that is whatever the hell inspires you. I advise you to get into the habit of learning to finish songs. Don't bounce from one song to the next. As a musician you are an entertainer. If you can play songs or music that people enjoy listening to then there will always be room for you in the industry.

If you're a beginner then you first need to get your feet wet and explore what it is that you like. Some people get a real kick out of performing music in front of crowds while others like me enjoy the process of producing/composing. Once you've figured out what it is you enjoy the most focus on it and let that help you decide which way you'd like to go with your music career.

For now you should focus on learning songs and finding yourself a teacher.
#29
Quote by dannydawiz
My advice to you is if you want to become a better guitar player invest some money into a Digital Audio Workstation like Logic Pro, Pro Tools, or Cubase and learn home recording.

Recording your playing everyday will give you an accurate measure of whether you are actually making any progress. There's also no lying when you're recording music. You either sound like trash or not. Chances are you are going to sound like garbage at first but that's okay because that's where we all start.


Not really good advice. First of all, that kind of software is expensive and time consuming to learn. He's already trying to learn one difficult thing. Why add another?

Second, why do you need a DAW for the purpose of tracking your progress by recording? That's complete overkill when you could record it on your phone.

Third, as nice of an idea as it is, it doesn't do a beginner that much good to record themselves because their ears and knowledge of the instrument haven't developed enough for them to effectively judge their recording. The entire point is to be able to listen to the recording for mistakes and a beginner doesn't know enough to identify a lot of mistakes.

If you can play songs or music that people enjoy listening to then there will always be room for you in the industry.


That's not at all how the music industry works.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#30
There are free daws + phone recordings aren't good quality + it doesn't take much effort to learn to plug a guitar into a computer and press the record button + find me an artist who made it in the industry by playing music people DIDN'T enjoy listening to.

Would you buy a CD or attend a show to see an artist who's music you didn't enjoy?

I agree on point 3 btw. Still don't think that learning to use a DAW is something any serious musician would regret.
#31
Learning a DAW is a special skill. There are FAR more musicians that have no knowledge about DAWs and do just fine. They depend on other people to have that skill if they want to record. It's like saying that if you're playing live you need to know how to run a soundboard.

I'm all for learning these skills if you're interested, but neither one is an impediment to developing your music performance skills.
#32
Quote by dannydawiz
There are free daws


And they are junk. And interface, etc and stuff costs more. Besides, you suggested industry standard grade stuff, not free stuff.

phone recordings aren't good quality


They're more than adequate enough for making recordings for that purpose.

it doesn't take much effort to learn to plug a guitar into a computer and press the record button


That's not learning a DAW. You can do that on your phone just fine.

find me an artist who made it in the industry by playing music people DIDN'T enjoy listening to.

Would you buy a CD or attend a show to see an artist who's music you didn't enjoy?


Not everyone in the industry play music first of all. Second, it's not the "making music people enjoy" part I have a problem with. It's the "there will always be room for you in the industry" part that is completely wrong. There is almost no room in the industry. Millions of guitar players out there and not anywhere near millions of music jobs.

You're grossly oversimplifying things and ignoring a million different factors that have to do with getting into the industry. You clearly have no idea about the way the industry works. It isn't some Oprah type deal where everybody gets a music job.

Also I wouldn't necessarily buy CDs or any other format of music from an artist even if I do like their music and I absolutely have been to shows of artists whose music I didn't enjoy because when you're involved in the industry, you go to shows for networking/business related reasons and not just for enjoyment.

Plenty of people that aren't in music still go see bands playing at local bars they frequent or with friends even if they don't like the band's' music because there is a lot more than going to a show for the music. It's a social experience.

I agree on point 3 btw. Still don't think that learning to use a DAW is something any serious musician would regret.


But TS is already trying to learn an instrument, which is already complex and time consuming as it is. Adding something completely different would be a distraction from the main goal. Also learning a DAW doesn't really do you any good if you don't know anything about music and so can't produce and have nothing to record.

Anyone that is serious about music would learn to actually play their instrument first before venturing off onto side items.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#33
Quote by reverb66
If you have the budget and a space to play loudly :

1) get a good combo tube amp - Mesa Boogie or better - your tone is almost entirely coming from the amp, not pedals and not even the guitar. A 30 watt tube amp is way more than loud enough for any situation, so don't get fooled into buying a 100 watt amp unless you really dig the tone.

2) get a guitar that suits your intended style of playing, but make sure you get it setup by a tech immediately after buying. Research how to change strings properly ( you tube has great tutorials on this), otherwise your guitar will be drifting out of tune constantly, which will make learning much more difficult. Strings on an electric guitar should be changed once a month at the least.

3) pedals - as a beginner you won't need much if you buy a good amp to start. A delay can help make leads more interesting in metal, but it's not necessary per say.


If you don't have the budget or space to play loudly( i.e you live in an apartment):

1) buy a small digital practice amp - Roland Micro Cube, Yamaha THR etc. or something you can use with headphones. This will give you much better results in a small room at low levels than any other type of amp because they push zero bass and that it what annoys the neighbors.

2) don't buy pedals for use with those digital amps, the have effects built in and sound terrible with pedals in any event.


If you want to be great, you need to practice 2 to 4 hours per day, ignore anyone that tells you 1 hour or less per day is enough, it's not unless all you want to do is play campfire songs. You'll be playing some advanced material within about a year. For metal etc. I suggest starting with early Sabbath ( Paranoid album) , Iron Maiden, and Metallica - they are all much easier than the more modern bands and it's a great place to start for leads.


(tube)

1) a quarter or halfstack would be fine too if he has the space and money. some amps are only available in head format. and 2x12 combos are really heavy.

also i disagree that your tone is "almost entirely" coming from the amp, and not from the pedals or the guitar. Sure, the amp probably is the single biggest factor affecting your tone, but the guitar and pedals affect things a lot too. It's hard to get a sound like a telecaster if you don't have a telecaster, for example. and pedals can make a really big difference, depending on exactly what the pedal is.

2) yeah (probably a superstrat of some description if he likes govan)

i disagree about the strings thing, though. it depends on a variety of factors- local climate, how much you sweat (and what type of sweat, some people's sweat kills strings, other people's not so much), how much you play, and also preference- some people prefer the sound of old strings. you also don't want to be changing strings so much you're not practising

3) an overdrive pedal used as a boost is pretty handy if you're playing at lower volumes, even if the amp has tons of distortion by itself.

(apartment)

yeah. it does depend on exactly what you mean by "low volumes", though. if you mean whisper (or apartment) i agree. if you mean loud tv action movie levels then i think you can get away with tube.

(practising) it depends on what you mean by "great". you can definitely get pretty good, and much better than campfire level, by playing an hour a day or less (i certainly play about that amount, i probably play an hour a day maybe one day in 2 or 3). it does depend on a variety of factors, of course (i played other instruments before guitar, though I practised even less for them ), and as i said it does depend on your definition of "great". EDIT: it also depends on how long you have. You can get pretty good with less practise but it'll take longer.

Quote by MaggaraMarine
I don't agree with the acoustic guitar thing. If you want to play electric, play electric. Playing acoustic won't motivate you if that's not what you want to do. The important thing when practicing on electric is not using noisy distortion sound to mask your mistakes.

Acoustic and electric are a bit different and you'll learn electric best if you play electric.


+1

Quote by Sean0913
Don't get another day job.

Do it your way, as most of us do anyways.

I know of virtually no one that's ever taken another person's life advice and says, "okay I won't do that." We usually have to learn by going out there and finding out what doesn't work. Experience is the best teacher. That's why its your life...figure it out.


yeah. or at least i know of cases where other people's advice (who should've known better) was downright terrible. Not saying that's necessarily the case here, but even if other people know more than you about the topic in question, they don't know you as well as you know yourself and you're the one who has to do the thing. if you think you can do it (or can't), you probably know better than someone else who's telling you differently.

if nothing else, at least in my opinion, it's a lot easier to live with mistakes if you feel you made them yourself than if you feel someone else talked you into it (especially if it was against your better judgment, but you deferred to them because you thought they had more experience than you).

Quote by theogonia777
Straps never unless it's one of those starter sets,


a lot of the higher-end fenders come with straps. i do agree it's the exception rather than the rule, though.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Mar 7, 2016,
#34
Quote by theogonia777
So what exactly should he do for money for the next five or so years until he has enough skill to make money doing something that he is essentially just restarting from scratch?


That's something he has to work out. If he wants to quit a day job and pursue this with no back up plan or way forward, that's his choice.

Poverty, loss, homelessness and hunger are great teachers.

It's his life. Either it will work, or it won't, and if for him it doesn't work, maybe he will want to have a second look at his present position about holding down a job.

But, at least he will know for sure. That's my point. Most of us need to be persuaded, via personal experience/outcome, once we have our minds set on something.

Best,

Sean
#35
^ Yeah.

Don't get me wrong- I'm not saying he should quit his job (having a backup is usually a good idea- though I guess it can be a double-edged sword as it takes time and energy which you can't put into your main interest, and also psychologically you might not try as hard if you know you have a safety net). I'd always advise being very careful and looking at all eventualities before you burn bridges etc..

But sometimes once an idea gets into your head (depending on what type of person you are) you can't get it out until you try it. And sometimes you have to try it to see whether it will work or not. And if it doesn't work (or isn't as attractive a proposition as it first appeared) it makes it a lot easier to go back to your back-up plan (or the job you quit).
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#36
Quote by Jokerxxxxx
New to guitar. Quit my job as a banker (f*ck that shit), I'm 28 years old, looking to dedicate my life to music.

Love metal, rock, fast and heavy/hard stuff. I need some gear and need to learn how to play (lessons?).

What kind of gear do I need? Guitar, pedals, etc? I'm a total newb and know nothing about what to buy.

I see there's this website for www.neoclassicalrevelation.com. Do any of you have any experience with this guy? Is that site legit? Or should I go find a teacher I can see and interact with in person?

Hope this wasn't too many questions. Thanks guys!


About the day job: I'm about to start phasing my day job out. However be careful. First of all if you're new to guitar, you need to work a lot on the instrument before you can start making money off it.

Secondly, to create the right opportunities for yourself in the music business, you're going to need money. Not a lot, but building products, instructional material, marketing yourself etc, needs a substantial amount of money.

If you do have the money, go for it. But if you don't I'd rather keep the job until I master the instrument and save money in the mean time so that later you can invest it in your career.

About the site: It's a legit site and Luca Turilli is a great musician and teacher. However that site's not for someone who just started out. Shred is an advanced technique.

You'd rather find a good (double emphasis on good, a bad teacher will ruin your dreams) local teacher before you try that stuff.