#1
Like the title says, is there any way to simplify these chords?
I have big hands and long fingers, but still I twist and turn like h**l to try to manage doing them.

Anyone?
#2
What particular voicing are you using? C# and D# are the type of chord where there isn't one voicing that is by far the most common (such as D, G, A, C, F, or E) and so it's harder to give advice without knowing if you're trying to use an A or E shape barre chord or something more like a C or D shape or what.
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#5
Quote by viktoria.guwallius
Sorry, forgot to say I don't know a thing about guitar terms! What is voicing?


Like which form of the chord you are using. Different chords can have many forms. The form that cdgraves mentioned is one possible voicing for C#, but there other voicings such as 446664 or 9,11,11,10,9,9 (though I don't think many guitarists would use full barre chords that high up). Either of them can be played partially by omitting some notes depending on the situation.

Another thing to consider is using a capo. Keys that use C# and D# chords are not particularly common in many genres of guitar based music, and when such keys are played, a capo is often used.
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#7
Doesn't seem particularly difficult. It would definitely help if you pull your thumb to the back of the neck like a classical guitar player would.
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#8
Quote by viktoria.guwallius
Sorry, forgot to say I don't know a thing about guitar terms! What is voicing?

The way you play the chord
#9
Quote by frecebutmito
The way you play the chord


That's not entirely accurate. It's not so much how you play the chord but rather the note selection. For example, xx666x is a complete C# voicing. xxx121 is the same voicing since it is the same notes despite being played differently. On the other hand if you make a 446664 barre chord and play xx666x and xxx664, they are two different voicings despite having the same fingering since you are putting a G#4 note on top rather than a G#3 on the bottom of the chord.
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#10
Quote by theogonia777
That's not entirely accurate. It's not so much how you play the chord but rather the note selection. For example, xx666x is a complete C# voicing. xxx121 is the same voicing since it is the same notes despite being played differently. On the other hand if you make a 446664 barre chord and play xx666x and xxx664, they are two different voicings despite having the same fingering since you are putting a G#4 note on top rather than a G#3 on the bottom of the chord.

I've been wrong all this time.Thanks
#11
Quote by viktoria.guwallius
Thank you for explaining.

I am trying to play like this:
http://www.guitar-chords.org.uk/chord-images/c-sharp-major-1.gif



Viktoria,

Did you work this out?

I'm just intermediate but can offer this:

Short answer: in the chord chart you posted, just play the notes on the A, D, and G strings. If you want, add the note on the B string too. That should make it easier to play.

Whichever of those you do for the C#, slide your whole hand up two frets and that's a D# chord.

Longer answer: A basic C# chord is made up of three notes: C#, E#, and G# (you may notice that E# is the exact same as F, but it's more accurate to call it E# here).

In the chord chart you linked, the notes are

5th string, 4th fret: C#
4th string, 3rd fret: E#
3rd string, 1st fret: G#
2nd string, 2nd fret: C#
1st string, 1st fret: E#

The notes on the 2nd and 1st strings are simply repeats of notes already used (albeit an octave higher), so you can leave them out. As long as you have a C#, G#, and E#...you have a C# chord. And it doesn't really even matter what order they are in. That means you could ALSO just use the notes on the 3rd, 2nd, and 1st strings.
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#12
Quote by viktoria.guwallius
Thank you for explaining.

I am trying to play like this:
http://www.guitar-chords.org.uk/chord-images/c-sharp-major-1.gif


Oh that really isn't hard at all. It's like a standard c but instead of putting your 1st finger on fret one on the B string (2nd string) you just bar on fret 1 strings 1 to 3. As far as nailing it, I make an exercise out of it, for instance do an AM (A-minor) and then the chord in the pic and bounce between them for a few minutes. Do this for a few days and you will find in no time at all it will become natural.
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#14
You can try having your wrist at different angle to see if it helps. Without seeing it in person, it's hard for me to identify what the problem is. However, I think it's important to note that these shapes require HORIZONTAL stretch of the fingers, which is very hard because there are not alot of situations in life beside playing instrument that requires these type of finger stretches. Just keep pushing through it until your fingers get used to it.

P.S. maybe post a video of you hand when playing these chords. That would make it alot easier to identify what the challenge is.
Last edited by donfully at Mar 20, 2016,
#15


This shape can be played by dropping the 3 and 4 fingers, and you can use that for both chords.

You can also play these two chords using the "A shape" barre chord, and also "E shape" barre chord, by placing the root note at the appropriate fret.

If you look up CAGED technique it will show you the basic major shapes.

All you need to know after that, is where the C# and D# are on the A and E string, and you're good to go.

But barre chords also tend to be difficult for beginners.
#18
Well, besides all of this, the simplest way to play those chords (if whatever piece you're playing doesn't require the use of your lowest open E note) would be to throw a capo on the first fret, and play C and D.
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#19
Start by playing C with your middle, ring, and pinky fingers. When you're comfortable with that, shift it up all 1 fret and start barring the first fret. You may find it easier to barre all 6 strings, or just the bottom 3. Depends on you.