#1
I've been playing guitar for a few years and I've heavily relied on playing just by ear. I can learn most songs by ear and have used that to compose a lot of original music from ideas i get in my head. While I'm proud of some of the things I can do I really want to step up my skills and learn more scales, chords, and theory.

One of my concerns is that I always play In DGCFAD because I really love the access to the deeper sounds and the tuning suites my voice a lot better. My question is am I gonna have any difficulty learning guitar not playing in Standard?
Last edited by zts24 at Mar 3, 2016,
#2
Quote by zts24
I've been playing guitar for a few years and I've heavily relied on playing just by ear. I can learn most songs by ear and have used that to compose a lot of original music from ideas i get in my head. While I'm proud of some of the things I can do I really want to step up my skills and learn more scales, chords, and theory.

One of my concerns is that I always play In DGCFAD because I really love the access to the deeper sounds and the tuning suites my voice a lot better. My question is am I gonna have any difficulty learning guitar not playing in Standard?


I've learned electric guitar primarily (as in 95% of the time) in Drop C (CGCFAD),
I wouldn't call it difficult, but it certainly is annoying when you want to play a song in standard, cause then you have to buy a capo, clip it on the 2nd fret, and lose 2 frets out of however many frets you have on your guitar.

The only other down side is that the strings are a lot thicker (which probably means more effort needed to fast pick the string; though I haven't really noticed since I've been playing in Drop C (with D'Addario 11s) for over a year now, I've gotten used to it). Which is not very noticeable, until you've played on thicker strings for a while, then pick up a guitar in standard (using 9s), and wonder "wow, these feel like rubber bands".

Oh, and some guitar teachers might not teach in anything other than EADGBE (least this is the case for the guitar teachers I've contacted in my area).
#3
DGCFAD is not an alternate tuning. It's a standard tuning tuned a whole step lower.

If you were talking about an actual alternate tuning, let's say open D, and only played in that tuning, it would affect the way you learn to play. It would only work well for certain songs and make everything else more difficult.

In DGCFAD the fingerings stay exactly the same. You can play the same chord shapes, same scale shapes, same everything. It will just sound a whole step lower. So it will have no effect on how you learn to play because you will learn exactly the sames shapes.


But then again, I don't understand why you would want to only play in that tuning. If the original song is in standard and you want to play it in the same key as the original, why not just tune your guitar to standard?

Again, you don't have to learn any new shapes or anything like that. When playing your own music, use whatever tuning you want, but when learning other people's songs, use the tuning they are in (or use a capo).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Mar 4, 2016,
#4
Hendrix would do 1/2 tone flat. He's was one of the best. Sound is what matters.
song stuck in my head today


#5
1/2 step down is really common. Van Halen, Kiss, Guns N' Roses, Metallica (after Black Album) and all the 80s glam bands tuned a half step down. Well, Mötley Crue tuned a whole step down. But those are all down tuned standard tunings, not alternate tunings.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
Quote by MaggaraMarine
DGCFAD is not an alternate tuning. It's a standard tuning tuned a whole step lower.

If you were talking about an actual alternate tuning, let's say open D, and only played in that tuning, it would affect the way you learn to play. It would only work well for certain songs and make everything else more difficult.

In DGCFAD the fingerings stay exactly the same. You can play the same chord shapes, same scale shapes, same everything. It will just sound a whole step lower. So it will have no effect on how you learn to play because you will learn exactly the sames shapes.


But then again, I don't understand why you would want to only play in that tuning. If the original song is in standard and you want to play it in the same key as the original, why not just tune your guitar to standard?

Again, you don't have to learn any new shapes or anything like that. When playing your own music, use whatever tuning you want, but when learning other people's songs, use the tuning they are in (or use a capo).


All of this. I also use DGCFAD. My first guitar has a Floyd, and I had it set up in DGCFAD when I bought it, and it's been there since. I did that at the time because I was playing Death songs, but since then I've written almost all of my own music, and learned pretty much everything I know about playing, using that tuning. Like Maggara said, it's all the same patterns, until you're talking about actual alternate tunings, like open tunings or, to a lesser extent, drop tunings. Before I got more guitars, I just kept a capo in my case, and used it for playing in E or Eb whenever necessary. Now I have two other guitar that stay in E and Eb. But I still keep capos around. Because options are awesome, and you never know when you might want to play Ukulele without a Ukulele.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#7
Quote by the_bi99man
you never know when you might want to play Ukulele without a Ukulele.


i know for a fact that I never want to play ukulele with or without a ukulele
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#9
Quote by MaggaraMarine
DGCFAD is not an alternate tuning. It's a standard tuning tuned a whole step lower.

If you were talking about an actual alternate tuning, let's say open D, and only played in that tuning, it would affect the way you learn to play. It would only work well for certain songs and make everything else more difficult.

In DGCFAD the fingerings stay exactly the same. You can play the same chord shapes, same scale shapes, same everything. It will just sound a whole step lower. So it will have no effect on how you learn to play because you will learn exactly the sames shapes.


But then again, I don't understand why you would want to only play in that tuning. If the original song is in standard and you want to play it in the same key as the original, why not just tune your guitar to standard?

Again, you don't have to learn any new shapes or anything like that. When playing your own music, use whatever tuning you want, but when learning other people's songs, use the tuning they are in (or use a capo).


Some DAWs, like Garageband, allows you to change the pitch (cent) of a track, so you can turn it 200cent lower, and you get a normally Standard-Tuning song, sounding like a D-Standard sounding song.
#10
You should learn guitar in EADGCF tuning. It is the only logical way.

F|------------------------------------2-4-5-|
C|------------------------------2-4-5-------|
G|------------------------2-3-5-------------|
D|------------------2-3-5-------------------|
A|------------1-3-5-------------------------|
E|------1-3-5-------------------------------|
B|1-3-5-------------------------------------|


This is a C Mixolydian scale. Notice the pattern of whole and half steps. This is the pattern to all modes, it isnt recognizable in standard tuning.
#11
To play with others there has to be some kind of standard. It gets difficult when everybody is playing in their own tuning but if you just play for yourself and your own projects do anything you want. When it comes to playing with other musicians it would be a good idea to become proficient in standard tuning as well. When playing live you don't want to be transposing all night long.

That's just me.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.