#1
I've seen it mentioned in a lot of threads but have been unable to reach and find a thorough explanation, so I have to ask: What does it mean to "break in" a speaker?

Does it simply mean to play unreasonably loud for a certain period of time, or? ;-)

... And does it apply to all speakers? What's the benefit?

Please explain...
#2
Speaker cones are made of paper, and when they're brand new they're a bit stiff. The stiffness can cause the sound to be a bit goofy (usually slightly harsh/fizzy), because the cone can't move as freely as is ideal. It's often fairly subtle, and is usually nothing more than the speaker sounding just a little bit cold and thin.

Using the speaker (and that's all it takes; you just have to move the cone) will 'relax' the paper a bit, like wearing in the spine on a new book. Once it can move more freely the speaker starts to sound like it's supposed to. It's not a "benefit" so much as a reality of the construction materials. As far as I know it happens on every speaker, although there are probably some that have more or less pronounced break-in than others. Some companies use detergents or chemical agents to soften the cones, so that the speaker is broken in to some extent right out of the box.

You don't have to play unreasonably loud, or even particularly loud, although it seems likely that more volume would break a speaker in faster. 5-10 hours of playing time is all it takes in my experience for the edge to come off the sound. Keep in mind that during that time, your ears are also adjusting to the new speaker, so "speaker break-in" may be nearly as much mental as it is a physical process - though the initial 'fizz' on some speakers is pretty hard to deny, so it's not all imaginary.
#4
Some speakers take quite a while to break in. My Eminence Governors took forever -- probably 50 hours to start sounding right. They were pretty harsh at first, and the low end just wasn't there. But after about 25 hours I could tell they were getting better, with noticeable improvement even after that. They sound awesome now!

A good way to break them in is to use a looper pedal; play a random sampling of riffs, set the volume fairly high, and then let the amp play itself for as long as you want.

Or just play it and deal with the tone not being perfect yet...
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#5
Celestion V30 take many loud hours to break in , they are a fizzy mess until you get 25 minimum or more hours , sound like a totally different speaker once broke-in
#6
Quote by Roc8995
Keep in mind that during that time, your ears are also adjusting to the new speaker, so "speaker break-in" may be nearly as much mental as it is a physical process - though the initial 'fizz' on some speakers is pretty hard to deny, so it's not all imaginary.


yeah. i've had new v30s right next to ones i've had for years, and there was a pretty big difference.
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