#1
Just like couple days ago I created "Buying a new Multi effect"
And when I think about it i'm not in hurry so I just going to spend more time to save up
some more money to buy a pedal"board
The question that was in my head all along is. What's the difference between multi effects and Building a pedalboard and I know that i'm not going to spend my money to buy all of the effects that is in the multi effect. But I heard a lot from my musician friends
some of them said they pretty much sounds the same. Some of them said building a pedalboard or using a single pedal for effects will sound better than most of the multi effect.
So lets get in the point my budget is 100$or+ per 1 pedal I want this "board" to be under 500$+power supply (I think we only have 3-4 pedal I can build my own small little board by myself)
Effects that I always use
-Distortion
-Delays
-Reverb
And that's it. I do think that at this price point I can get pretty decent new pedal. I don't want anything that's really fancy I just want a simple stuff and not completely trash.
I don't really play a wide range of musics
-Metal (mostly)
-Hark rocks,Rocks
*i'm willing to go new if possible*
Thank you
#2
What guitar and amp do you have? That's pretty important in terms of distortions, especially in terms of whether you're going to be boosting a driven channel or just going for pure pedal distortion (the former tends to be preferred for amps that already have decent distortion).

For power supplies, Diago's Micropower 9 is what I use; it's small, it has plenty of current for a small board, and it has optional (fairly cheap) adapters and isolators that should let it handle most things you'd put on your board.

As far as delays, the EHX Deluxe Memory Boy and the Ibanez Echo Shifter are pretty tasty, versatile analog units. If you'd prefer digital which might work better for metal, I'm less sure.

For reverb, the TC Electronic Hall of Fame should have you covered for a plenty of bases, and should come in south of $100 if you go used.
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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Mar 6, 2016,
#3
What amp do you have and what use will you give your pedals? Gigs? Bedroom playing?
#4
I have only a Solid State amp (Randall V2XM) i'm not in a band so I don't gig well rarely.
Mostly bedroom playing
My guitar Schecter Banshee active (81/85)
here's specs(if needed)
Alder body flame maple top
5pcs maple/walnut neck(bolt on)
Ebony fretboard
Emgs 81/85
I know I only got a Solid State amp but I want to produce maximum quality of tones and sounds of the amp at least
Last edited by joseph24 at Mar 6, 2016,
#5
I haven't heard that amp, but if you like the distortion and just want more of that, you can use a Tubescreamer or something similar as a clean boost to achieve that. If you don't like the distortion on that amp, or you'd prefer something different, something along the lines of the DOD Boneshaker might suit you better.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#6
use that money for a new amp.
Ibanez Rg 321mh
Squier Classic Vibe 1970s Precision Bass
Guitar Rig 5
Presonus Audiobox
Behringer Truth B2030A
#7
^^^^ This. Sell the amp and use that and your budget for a decent modelling amp. That will give you maximum flexibility of tones and effects.
Moving on.....
#8
Quote by joseph24
Just like couple days ago I created "Buying a new Multi effect"
And when I think about it i'm not in hurry so I just going to spend more time to save up
some more money to buy a pedal"board
The question that was in my head all along is. What's the difference between multi effects and Building a pedalboard and I know that i'm not going to spend my money to buy all of the effects that is in the multi effect. But I heard a lot from my musician friends
some of them said they pretty much sounds the same. Some of them said building a pedalboard or using a single pedal for effects will sound better than most of the multi effect.


I think you need to clarify the results of the argument you seem to be having in your head, between a multiFX and a pedal board.

AT one point back when I picked up a Pod XT bean for quiet/headphone practice. I already had tube amps and a bunch of pedals, but the modeler was specifically for portability and for those places where I really couldn't use an amp.

What happened, however, was that the Pod's models of FX that I'd never tried before (and a few amps I'd never really considered before) ignited a buying spree. I'd listen to the pedal modeled, try the options, and next thing you'd know I'd be in the store with the Real Thing at my feet. At the moment I have some two and a half of those big flap-top bins of pedals, packed closely. And a half-dozen amps had been added to the nine I already had. Some of this was vintage, some new.

At some point I realized that while *some* of the Real Things were slightly different and maybe better individually than what was modeled in the Pod, the overwhelming convenience of the multiFX (and face it, SO much cheaper) was just winning the battle.

Live, there was no contest. There was no way for me to tap dance fast enough to change mutliple FX at once, and there was no way for me to change the parameters of a single effect from one part of a song to another quickly enough (much less those of more than one effect).

So whatever I gained in minor improvements in sound, I lost in versatility, portability and...uh...cash. At one point I added up the values represented on the pedalboard for pedals, power supplies, cables, etc., and it was far beyond the cost of the multi and floorboard (I was using separate "bean" and floorboard units, not an all-in-one).

It's likely a different story if what you're going to do is sit in your bedroom and bang out the same distorted metal power chords with a few riffs. If you're doing whole songs, and if you're doing them with other people, the argument changes direction.
Last edited by dspellman at Mar 6, 2016,
#9
I've been looking into multi-effect recently too. I stumbled upon the Zoom MS-50G, looks pretty good for the price ($100 USD). I agree that your amp wants replacing, but if you're just a bedroom player you don't need to go out and get a bunch of great gear. There are some cheaper multi-effects out there (like the one I mentioned) that sound pretty good, more than enough for beginners and hobbyists.
#10
The big drawback to having a string of six stompboxes is the noise. Every unit you add to your signal chain can add a little hum or hiss. So if you want to run loads of effects at once then perhaps a multi is the way to go.
That said, I prefer individual stompboxes. I have a bunch, I just don't use them all at once. The way I use pedals, individual ones work best for me. I'm often on my knees during a performance warping a delayed chord, or changing the tremolo speed or whatever. My use of pedals is part of the music in a way that goes beyond tonal colour.
So it depends...
#11
Quote by scarletcantos
I have a bunch, I just don't use them all at once. The way I use pedals, individual ones work best for me. I'm often on my knees during a performance warping a delayed chord, or changing the tremolo speed or whatever.


Sounds like you may need a keyboard!
#12
I agree with dspellman that if you are just using your amp at home and not doing any gigs you may just want one two pedals. If you start doing gigs where you have make changes to your sound quickly like going from a rhythm setting say with a little chorus and crunch then to a lead setting with distortion, compression, delay, reverb then back to the rhythm, the easiest way to do that in a live situation is a programmable multi-effects unit with more than two (up and down) pedals. I have several multi effects pedals and two pedal boards that I have assembled over the years that rarely get used these days . When I gig it's a multi effects. It takes up less room on stage and is just more convenient to make quick changes.

As an aside you'll find that anytime you get the "What amp are you using?" question, the answer will most often be "You need a new amp" so don't get discouraged about the amp thing. You have a decent combo amp with more than enough power for your use and a 12" Celestion speaker. If your amp works for you keep it until something changes and you need something bigger for gigs.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Mar 7, 2016,
#13
Quote by Rickholly74

As an aside you'll find that anytime you get the "What amp are you using?" question, the answer will most often be "You need a new amp" so don't get discouraged about the amp thing. You have a decent combo amp with more than enough power for your use and a 12" Celestion speaker. If your amp works for you keep it until something changes and you need something bigger for gigs.


Agreed tube amp users typically tend to think that all SS amps are crap and there is no doubt IMO that they are lacking compared to valve amps. I have a Mesa Roadster and 6505+head and prefer tube amps, but I also have an SS Randall RG-75 and it sounds pretty damn good especially when I throw my 80's TS-9 on it and I think for a bedroom player on a budget it would most definately suffice.

If money is tight and the Randall gets a decent tone that you are happy with, then hold onto it and grab a multi FX. But if you are dead set on saving up and investing in stomp boxes and building a board then I would consider upgrading my amp instead.
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