#1
So, after about over a year of playing, I think it's time to start learning chords.

Are there any easy ways of memorizing the chords (i.e. which frets to press down for which chord)

I aim to learn the Standard E chords, but if there are any chords applicable to DropC, I will try to learn those too

Thanks
#2
One year without learning chords?

With drop tunings the note at a certain fret on the dropped string is 1 whole step lower on a standard tuning so for example in drop D tuning, an E major would be 2-2-2-1-0-0.

Some tips:
Your tuning is drop C, CGCFAD, as you can see two strings have the same tuning. On the 5th fret on the G string, it is also C. This is an easy place for big C chords with open strings.
For example,
0-5-7-7-0-0
0-5-7-7-6-0
0-5-7-7-7-0
0-5-4-7-0-0
0-5-3-7-0-0

Fully Moveable chord shapes:
5-5-5-7-8-5
5-5-5-7-8-7
5-5-5-7-8-6.

Easy chords for drop tuning:
5-5-7-x-x-x (x means muted)
0-0-0-2-3-2
×-5-x-7-0-0


Just experiment dude! that's how I found my own weird chords and taste.
#3
Start simple. Learn your basic open chords (chords closest to the nut, I call em cowboy chords) like E, A, G, C, F, D etc. then learn your basic bar chord shapes (major and minor). If you use the knowledge you gain from learning those chords to learn the others, you'll learn much quicker; ie minor bar chords are the same shape as the open Em chord, or the major bar chord shape starting on the A string is the same shape as Amajor. This way you'll know to play F#major, all you need to do is move your Fmajor chord up for example.

Also learn how chords are formed, for now just focus on basic triads. A triad (aka your basic major or minor chord) is composed of the 1st (root) 3rd and 5th notes of the scale. So C major is made with C (1st), E(3rd) and G(5th). the difference between major and minor chords is the 3rd, minor chords have flat 3rd (so 1 step down). Take Emajor:

e-0 (E)
B-0 (B)
G-1 (G#)
D-2 (E)
A-2 (B)
E-0 (E)

As you can see, your basic emajor chord is made up of E's (1st) a G# (3rd) and B's (5th). Now if you flatten the G# to G:

e-0 (E)
B-0 (B)
G-1 (G)
D-2 (E)
A-2 (B)
E-0 (E)
You get Eminor, because you're flattening the 3rd, which is G#, to G (often we'll call this b3 to make it clear it's a minor 3rd)

If you focus on applying your knowledge to learn faster, and understand how these chords work, you'll learn very quickly. As for DropC, any chord can be played in any tuning, it's just a matter of transposing the notes to fit the string intervals. Since DropC is just a step down from DropD, you can see that every string except for the low E behaves the same as normal standard tuning, so any chord that doesn't use the low string will automatically work in dropC. Other than that just Google "chords in dropD" and you'll be fine.
Quote by Fat Lard
post of the year, thank you
#4
Quote by Zerath
One year without learning chords?

With drop tunings the note at a certain fret on the dropped string is 1 whole step lower on a standard tuning so for example in drop D tuning, an E major would be 2-2-2-1-0-0.

Some tips:
Your tuning is drop C, CGCFAD, as you can see two strings have the same tuning. On the 5th fret on the G string, it is also C. This is an easy place for big C chords with open strings.
For example,
0-5-7-7-0-0
0-5-7-7-6-0
0-5-7-7-7-0
0-5-4-7-0-0
0-5-3-7-0-0

Fully Moveable chord shapes:
5-5-5-7-8-5
5-5-5-7-8-7
5-5-5-7-8-6.

Easy chords for drop tuning:
5-5-7-x-x-x (x means muted)
0-0-0-2-3-2
×-5-x-7-0-0


Just experiment dude! that's how I found my own weird chords and taste.


Yea, one year without learning chords.
I'm primarily learning on my own, with the help of YouTube videos, Songsterr (for tabs), and (recently) the UG forum.
I mainly learn skills from the songs I learn (basically, I find the song I like, find the tabs, learn to play it). I never came across a song (least until now) that I needed to learn chords (or maybe I did, but not those chords like: (going EADGBE) 5-7-7-6-5-5 (no idea what chord this is on standard e); the majority of chords I've played are stuff in Drop C like power chords (555, 333, 111, 777, 999, etc.), and (I dunno what kind of chords these are called) chords like 133, 355, 577, 113, 335, 557, etc.
#5
Okey.

Let's stick to standard tuning. EADGBE

Open chords:
E major:
0-2-2-1-0-0
E minor:
0-2-2-0-0-0
A major:
X-0-2-2-2-0
A minor:
X-0-2-2-1-0
C major:
X-3-2-0-1-0
G major:
3-2-0-0-0-3
3-2-0-0-3-3
G minor:
3-X-0-3-3-3
D major:
X-0-0-2-3-2
X-X-0-2-3-2
F major:
X-3-3-2-1-1

If you look at E & A chords, you can see that an E major fingering shape is the same as A minor (just move the shape to the next strings). Furthermore you can notice that you only need to change one finger to switch between major and minor. Memorize and understand that. (Read about 5ths and 7ths if you want to know more theory ).

These two shapes (E and A) is the most common when using bar chords. What is a bar chord? It's simply putting a finger across multiple strings behind a chord shape (usually across 5 or 6 strings) so that you can move it around. This enables different characteristics and possibilities of the equivalent open chord. It also makes it faster to switch between a C and a D chord for example.

Example of a D bar chord:
X-5-7-7-7-5
Think about the E and the A shape and you'll recognize it has the same shape as the A major chord, only difference is that it is transposed higher up the neck, making it a D major chord.

Another example :
3-5-5-4-3-3
G major chord, same shape as E major, just higher up the neck.

How do you know what pitch a certain note has? By knowing how the full tone scale looks like:

A A#/Bb B/Cb B#/C C#/Db D D#/Eb E E#/F F#/Gb G G#/Ab

And after G#/Ab it becomes A again, repeat forever.

With the two bar shapes we mentioned you can think of it like this:

When doing the A shape, what fret are you fretting the bar finger on the A string? The note at that fret tells you if it's a C or a D or a F (etc ).

When doing the E shape, what fret are you fretting the bar finger on the low E string? The note at that fret tells you if it's an E, G , A or F (etc).


So for one last example :
X-2-4-4-3-2
A minor shape
Second fret A string is a B
So it's a B minor


5-7-7-6-5-5
E major shape
Fifth fret low E string is an A
So it's a A major.

Hope this helps you get a basic understanding and a convenient way to think about it when starting out!
#6
Thank you for the information,

So to get from a major to a minor, its simply lifting off one finger from a string?

also, I have a question about chords like: 5-7-7-6-5-5
How would I go about pressing the notes on fret5? do I place my index finger over the whole fret on all of the notes, then use my ring and pinky to press the 7th frets, and middle finger to press the 5th fret?

Thanks
#7
Quote by Parac
Thank you for the information,

So to get from a major to a minor, its simply lifting off one finger from a string?

also, I have a question about chords like: 5-7-7-6-5-5
How would I go about pressing the notes on fret5? do I place my index finger over the whole fret on all of the notes, then use my ring and pinky to press the 7th frets, and middle finger to press the 5th fret?

Thanks


I find it a little weird that you've been playing for a year and have no idea what a bar chord is. But yes, you "bar" your index finger across all strings, and fret the other notes with your remaining fingers.

"So to get from a major to a minor, its simply lifting off one finger from a string?"
I don't think you understood my example. In that instance, yes, because the note below the major 3rd (which, in a Emajor chord, is G#) is G, which is just the open G string. That does not at all mean it works for all chords. Let's use another example:
e: 2 (F#=3rd)
B: 3 (D=1st)
G: 2 (A=5th)
D: 0 (D=1st)
A: X
E: X

This is your basic Dmajor chord, and as you can see the major 3rd in this chord is the F#, which is the 2nd fret on the high e string. Lifting your finger off the e string won't get you Dminor, it'll a completely different chord (Dsuspended2nd in this case). Remember, the minor 3rd is a semitone (1fret) down from the major 3rd, so a Dminor chord would look like this:
e: 1 (F=b3)
B: 3 (D=1st)
G: 2 (A=5th)
D: 0 (D=1st)
A: X
E: X

You really owe it to yourself to learn about intervals and how the major scale works if you not only want to learn chords faster, but to retain them, and be able to construct them without having to look up "how to play X chord" every time you come across one you haven't used before. It seems like you need to start at the basics, so learn what the major scale is, what intervals are, and how chords are formed. In the meanwhile, learning your cowboy chords should keep you busy.
Quote by Fat Lard
post of the year, thank you
#8
Personallly I wouldn't advise worrying about various tunings at this point. You'll develop a better foundation by simply learning the basic major and minor chords in both their open version and barred versions, and then expand on that to learn the more common variations such as 7ths, suspended, 7sus4, 9ths, etc. That's more than enough to keep you busy for a while. It will also give you a better understaning of harmony and chord construction. Then the rest of it will make sense when you're ready to dive into various tunings.
#9
Quote by Parac

also, I have a question about chords like: 5-7-7-6-5-5
How would I go about pressing the notes on fret5? do I place my index finger over the whole fret on all of the notes, then use my ring and pinky to press the 7th frets, and middle finger to press the 5th fret?
Yes. This is a "barre" chord, as mentioned. These are tough for beginners, who usually start with the "open position" shapes.
Assuming EADGBE, there are 5 major and 3 minor shapes in open position (ie incorporating open strings):
Major: C G D A E
Minor: Em, Am, Dm.
(You can find all these shapes easily enough online)

The other 7 major and 9 minor chords are all usually played as barre versions of one or two of those shapes (although other options are possible).
Eg, an F chord is an "E shape" in barre form on fret 1: 1-3-3-2-1-1 - and is probably the toughest chord that confronts any beginner.
A B chord can played as an E shape barre on 7th fret, or as an "A shape" barre on 2nd fret: x-2-4-4-4-2 (maybe even harder than F!).

In EADGBE power chords are played as follows:
6th string root:
1-3-3-x-x-x = F5 (root-5th-root)
5th string root:
x-2-4-4-x-x (root-5th-root), or 2-2-4-x-x-x (5th-root-5th) = B5
In either case, a 2-string root and 5th pair is often enough.
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 8, 2016,
#10
For least effort and most utility, learn intervals (shapes and sounds) ... combine that with realising that ANY chord is some combination of intervals, possibly laid out in different octaves.
So, gradually learn the intervals in various chord types (e.g. b3, 3 and 5 are used massively).

Don't learn chords by names of notes involved, other than the root.


https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_2.html may help you.
#11
Learn the basic open shapes. Know where the root of those shapes is and you can use them to play any major or minor chord. The advantage of guitar is that all shapes are movable. You can learn the E major shape and just move it up and down the fretboard to create different major chords.

I would also suggest learning about chord construction. Basic chords have three notes in them - root, third and fifth. You can make a major chord minor by moving the third of the chord down one fret.

For example E major 0 2 2 1 0 0 - E minor 0 2 2 0 0 0; A major x 0 2 2 2 0 - A minor x 0 2 2 1 0; D major x x 0 2 3 2 - D minor x x 0 2 3 1 (bold = third).

Tuning your guitar to a drop D like tuning (drop C is drop D but just a whole step lower) only affects the notes on the 6th string. So shapes that don't use the 6th string stay the same. Every note on the 6th string sounds a whole step (ie, two frets) lower, so to play for example an E major chord, you need to play the note on the 6th string 2 frets higher and 0 2 2 1 0 0 becomes 2 2 2 1 0 0.

It may make more sense if we use power chords. 1 3 3 x x x in standard becomes 3 3 3 x x x in drop D. So to "convert" standard tuning shapes to drop D, you just need to move the note on the 6th string two frets up. Everything else stays the same. The shapes are the same in drop C (as in drop D), but everything just sounds a whole step lower (which means playing the A major shape sounds like G major).
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#12
^ +1

Quote by Zerath
One year without learning chords?


i probably went a lot longer than that
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
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#13
If you have not already done it, I'd recommend dipping your feet into the music theory enough to understand how chords derive from a scale.

So the major scale Whole-Whole-Half-Whole-Whole-Whole-Half in, say, the key of C leads to C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C. Each of those notes is now it's own type of chord, using the 3rd and 5th relative to that note.
C - E - G
D - F - A
E - G- B
F - A - C
G - B - D
A - C - E
B - D - F

The seven chords in the C major scale. Then you figure out the type of chord (major, minor, diminished) based on the interval from 1st to 3rd and from 3rd to 5th

C - E - G = 4-3 (major)
D - F - A = 3-4 (minor)
E - G- B = 3-4 (minor)
F - A - C = 4-3 (major)
G - B - D = 4-3 (major)
A - C - E = 3-4 (minor)
B - D - F = 3-3 (diminished)

So you can find any combination of G, B and D on the fretboard that you can press simultaneously with your fretting hand, and that's a G major chord. It does not have to be all six strings. Three is fine. So you could play 3-2-0-0-0-3 or you could play 3-2-0-x-x-x- or x-x-x-0-0-3, or x-x-x-7-8-7. There are a lot of options for any chord.

You'll want to start out learning the common chord shapes, but I think it helps to have a sense where chords come from, and which are in which key. I think this understanding is particularly useful if you are using different tunings.
Bernie Sanders for President!
#14
I suggest you start learning to play in a standard tuning to start with. You need to learn how to play normally first. Down tuning is a thing you may not understand if you have no knowledge of the what and why of tuning down. Start with a normal tuning and move to down tuning when you have done a lot of that.

What have you been playing with no chords? I'm not trying to bust your balls, I'm honestly curious.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Mar 9, 2016,
#15
Quote by krm27

The seven chords in the C major scale. Then you figure out the type of chord (major, minor, diminished) based on the interval from 1st to 3rd and from 3rd to 5th

C - E - G = 4-3 (major)
D - F - A = 3-4 (minor)
E - G- B = 3-4 (minor)
F - A - C = 4-3 (major)
G - B - D = 4-3 (major)
A - C - E = 3-4 (minor)
B - D - F = 3-3 (diminished)
YMMV, but I find it easier to work with intervals from the root. That way the chord names make more sense (because the interval from 3rd to 5th is irrelevant, and muddies the picture).

For major and minor chords, they both have "perfect 5ths" (7 half-steps), so it's the 3rd that distinguishes them and gives the chords their names.
C-G and D-A are both perfect 5ths. But -
C-E = 4 half-steps
D-F = 3 half-steps
C-E is bigger, D-F is smaller, and that's all that "major" and "minor" mean.

When it comes to the diminished chord, then it's the 5th that is distinctive, so the chord gets named after that.
"Diminished" = half-step smaller than "perfect" (B-F instead of B-F#).

The shorthand gets a little more complicated with 7ths, but it's still about counting from the root. That's what "7th" means, the 7th note up from the root.

IOW, (for the OP) some knowledge of interval terminology will help understand chord names (if you want to ).
Quote by krm27
So you can find any combination of G, B and D on the fretboard that you can press simultaneously with your fretting hand, and that's a G major chord. It does not have to be all six strings. Three is fine. So you could play 3-2-0-0-0-3 or you could play 3-2-0-x-x-x- or x-x-x-0-0-3, or x-x-x-7-8-7. There are a lot of options for any chord.

You'll want to start out learning the common chord shapes, but I think it helps to have a sense where chords come from, and which are in which key. I think this understanding is particularly useful if you are using different tunings.
Absolutely!
#16
I would start by learning songs, and then learning the CAGED chords for those songs. You'll notice that for most chords there are only 3 main fundamental shapes, and that more complex chords are just modifications of those, which makes it really easy.

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/chord_name.php

This site has everything you'd ever need from a theory standpoint, but I'd not recommend sitting down and going through everything. It also has a lot of sort of, less useful chord shapes for every chord. Less useful for understanding guitar, or less sort of common, but any combination of notes can be useful to some degree, of course.

Chords are actually really easy, from a sort of theory standpoint, if you learn them the right way. They can be a bit difficult to physically do at first, but again, it's a lot of the same sorts of patterns moved around, for the more basic chord shapes. Chords can also get be tricky for more advanced shapes.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Mar 9, 2016,
#17
Quote by fingrpikingood
I would start by learning songs, and then learning the CAGED chords for those songs. You'll notice that for most chords there are only 3 main fundamental shapes, and that more complex chords are just modifications of those, which makes it really easy.

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/chord_name.php
That's OK for simple chords - so will probably suit the OP - but gets more complicated chords wrong. Just a friendly warning.
#18
Quote by jongtr
That's OK for simple chords - so will probably suit the OP - but gets more complicated chords wrong. Just a friendly warning.


Like what? I've never encountered issues with it. I've stumped it a few times, but that's it.

Usually computers are pretty good at that, because you can just list all the possibly chords, and the notes, and which fret/string is which note, and then it just cross references those.

I would be surprised if it got things wrong.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Mar 9, 2016,
#19
Guys...

Teach a man a chord voicing and he has one chord voicing.

Teach a man chord construction and he'll never run out of chords again.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#20
Quote by Jet Penguin
Guys...

Teach a man a chord voicing and he has one chord voicing.

Teach a man chord construction and he'll never run out of chords again.


Ya, but chord construction specifically on the guitar, for guitarists. It's one thing to know that if you add a major 7th to a major chord, you get the major7th chord, and its another thing to be able to play a given major chord anywhere on the neck, and know how to convert all of those into a maj7 chord.
#21
Total agreement.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#22
Quote by fingrpikingood
Ya, but chord construction specifically on the guitar, for guitarists. It's one thing to know that if you add a major 7th to a major chord, you get the major7th chord, and its another thing to be able to play a given major chord anywhere on the neck, and know how to convert all of those into a maj7 chord.


Exactly, so...simply learn how to do that, so that you never need look at a chord book again, and may even come up with your own creative voicings.

Know the notes on the neck of the guitar.

Understand chord construction

Understand essential versus non essential tones, given that we have 6 strings and 4 fingers.

Best,

Sean
#23
Quote by fingrpikingood
Like what? I've never encountered issues with it. I've stumped it a few times, but that's it.
Well, that's what I mean. I stumped it too. (I entered a C9#11 chord, it told me it was some kind of F# chord. I know there's the tritone sub relationship, but it didn't give me the option; and I deliberately voiced the chord so the C root was more obvious. It also only uses sharp enharmonics, which is probably the worst thing about it. IOW, it's illiterate; it can't spell.)
If it can make mistakes - or be confused - that's likely to on the stranger chords you can't work out for yourself. The very times you need help - it can't help. That's generally the same with all these automated music recognition algorithms.

Of course, as I say: for beginners it's fine, because it's good with basic chords - although, as far as I've tested it, you usually have to ignore all the suggested names for any one chord apart from the first one.
TIP (for users): the simpler the chord name (out of all the options) the more likely it's correct.
And beware of enharmonics. A Bb chord is (almost) never called an A# chord. And a C7 chord never (ever) has an A# in it.

EVEN BETTER TIP: learn what Sean says, and ignore such sites. (Or visit them occasionally for fun and laugh and shake your head...)
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 10, 2016,
#24
I generally shake my head. You could learn everything in just a few lessons.

To your point: a C9#11 is

C E G Bb D F#

So it calls this a what...? F#maj9b13? F#maj9 aug?

why not call it an Em7b5b13?

or a Bb11+5...

You get the idea....wow. Ugly.

Best,

Sean

Shakes head. Not funny to me. Its completely unnecessary.
#25
Context isn't dictated by the guitar, it's by the whole ensemble

Quote by Sean0913 at #33872444

we have 6 strings and 4 fingers.

Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#26
Quote by Sean0913
I generally shake my head. You could learn everything in just a few lessons.

To your point: a C9#11 is

C E G Bb D F#

So it calls this a what...? F#maj9b13? F#maj9 aug?
Actually I just checked again. Here's what it says
x-3-2-3-3-2 = C9b5 (reasonable I guess) or D9#5 (I see where it's coming from, but it's not the shape I'd choose for a D9#5...)
3-3-2-3-3-2 = blank! it refuses to answer
8-10-8-9-7-x = F#7 (b5,b9)
8-10-8-7-7-0 = blank again....

OK that's maybe a weird shape, but then I tried a nice easy C13
8-10-8-9-10-x = ? (no reply)
Quote by Sean0913

why not call it an Em7b5b13?

or a Bb11+5...
Here's one you'll like...

What chord is this? x-0-2-2-3-3?

chord-name offers these solutions:
1. D sus2sus4
2. G 6add9(no 3rd)
3. A 7sus4

OK, the right one is in there. But third on the list?
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 10, 2016,
#27
^Yo dawg that's a quartal chord technically every answer is right.

Maybe I should to a Jet Talks Whatever on harmony.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#28
Quote by jongtr
Well, that's what I mean. I stumped it too. (I entered a C9#11 chord, it told me it was some kind of F# chord. I know there's the tritone sub relationship, but it didn't give me the option; and I deliberately voiced the chord so the C root was more obvious. It also only uses sharp enharmonics, which is probably the worst thing about it. IOW, it's illiterate; it can't spell.)
If it can make mistakes - or be confused - that's likely to on the stranger chords you can't work out for yourself. The very times you need help - it can't help. That's generally the same with all these automated music recognition algorithms.

Of course, as I say: for beginners it's fine, because it's good with basic chords - although, as far as I've tested it, you usually have to ignore all the suggested names for any one chord apart from the first one.
TIP (for users): the simpler the chord name (out of all the options) the more likely it's correct.
And beware of enharmonics. A Bb chord is (almost) never called an A# chord. And a C7 chord never (ever) has an A# in it.

EVEN BETTER TIP: learn what Sean says, and ignore such sites. (Or visit them occasionally for fun and laugh and shake your head...)


Ya, for me, I need to organize the chords how they are named in my own mind as well that fit into my knowledge of theory. So, I don't mind if the more complex chords can't really be named properly by something like that. For me, the lowest note really matters a lot, and sites like that sometimes are a bit too easy to place the root anywhere.

I use that site from time to time when something relevant for it comes up, and I think it's a good resource, but obviously, one should learn to build chords, how to build them, and how nomenclature works, which I do know, for the most part, anyway.

My way of doing it works for me. I try to do it as simply as possible. Simple in a visual way for me, and in the way I use chords. A chord that I use while I voice lead from one chord to another, I don't care what it's called, for example.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Mar 10, 2016,
#30
Quote by jongtr
Actually I just checked again. Here's what it says
x-3-2-3-3-2 = C9b5 (reasonable I guess) or D9#5 (I see where it's coming from, but it's not the shape I'd choose for a D9#5...)
3-3-2-3-3-2 = blank! it refuses to answer
8-10-8-9-7-x = F#7 (b5,b9)
8-10-8-7-7-0 = blank again....

OK that's maybe a weird shape, but then I tried a nice easy C13
8-10-8-9-10-x = ? (no reply)
Here's one you'll like...

What chord is this? x-0-2-2-3-3?

chord-name offers these solutions:
1. D sus2sus4
2. G 6add9(no 3rd)
3. A 7sus4

OK, the right one is in there. But third on the list?


Ya lol, that's the one that's odd to me also, the 13s in E shape. I'm not sure why it doesn't get that one. That's the best 13 shape, imo. Although I tend to drop the 5, so for me that B#13 would be 8-x-8-9-10 and then maybe the 8 on high E again, or another 10, idk it depends on what I want the melody line to be like, really.

But ya, I definitely see what you mean about that thing not being perfect, but you know what? I don't ever find any of them really are, and there are often multiple ways to name a chord anyway. So, you can't really fully depend on them, otherwise it would be too confusing. But imo, it should really know that 13 voicing.

Plus, like you and others mentioned, you don't really want to rely on anything like that fully, I don't find. It's a complement. I use it sometimes if I want to quickly see how it would name something, and then I assess whether I want to name it that given the context I would use it in.

I have my own sort of specific way I mentally assimilate chords on guitar, so I don't rely on that site. It doesn't really matter to me if it comes up empty, or names things in a way I find odd. I'll figure it out and assimilate whatever it is into my web of guitar sense in whatever way I find most suitable anyway. But I still find it kind of useful. Just not in a fully dependable sort of way, and not in a "memorize everything on this site" sort of way either.
#31
Quote by fingrpikingood
Ya, but chord construction specifically on the guitar, for guitarists. It's one thing to know that if you add a major 7th to a major chord, you get the major7th chord, and its another thing to be able to play a given major chord anywhere on the neck, and know how to convert all of those into a maj7 chord.

That is why I tune to 4ths (: every guitarists' problem is solved, chords work anywhere on the neck.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1698782
Here is my explanation of chord construction. I hope it teaches someone something.
#32
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
That is why I tune to 4ths (: every guitarists' problem is solved, chords work anywhere on the neck.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1698782
Here is my explanation of chord construction. I hope it teaches someone something.


You still have to learn that same thing. The difference is, you only have to learn it once. On standard tuning, I learned it 3 times. It's not such a huge workload, they are closely related too. The third position is a bit unwieldy, and the shapes are not ideal, but the first two grip classes are very powerful.

The extra effort of learning the 3 grips rather than one, is worth it for what it lets me do musically. That's why the guitar is tuned the way it is.

If you were an instrument designer, or a music composer, and you invented the guitar for others to learn to play, would you design it so that it is easier for people to learn? Or would you design it so that its potential is greatest, and the best guitarists, and the hardest working ones will rise to the top?

I find some of your grips are unwieldy even to learn at first, but barre chords are not easy also I guess. I'll grant you, that making the patterns the same makes learning it a bit easier because there are less patterns to learn. But I find standard tuning, for the sort of music I play, is a far superior tuning system overall. Maybe it's a little bit more difficult, but I would much prefer a higher difficulty with greater potential, than an easier start with a lower ceiling.
#33
All of the chords I explained in my thread can be played on the E A D G strings. You dont have to forget or learn anything. Just the chord shapes. It is a very simple method for chord shapes. I wouldnt be preaching if I didnt think it was beneficial to others.

It is a pretty simple method for constructing chords. Ignore that my B & E strings are tuned up to C & F, there is plenty of applicable information. That is, if you want to be able to play your Maj7, 7, m7 & m7b5 chords with the 1, 3, 5 or 7 as the root, or the leading tone, and then being able to apply extensions as well as keeping up with the inversions.

The chord shapes themselves are actually quite easy to play. It's pretty convenient to have them all worked out to fit over exactly 4 strings. Give a few of them a try and you might like it.

I can play Giant Steps by John Coltrane using chords instead of a single note melody. That is pretty dang useful
#34
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
All of the chords I explained in my thread can be played on the E A D G strings. You dont have to forget or learn anything. Just the chord shapes. It is a very simple method for chord shapes. I wouldnt be preaching if I didnt think it was beneficial to others.

It is a pretty simple method for constructing chords. Ignore that my B & E strings are tuned up to C & F, there is plenty of applicable information. That is, if you want to be able to play your Maj7, 7, m7 & m7b5 chords with the 1, 3, 5 or 7 as the root, or the leading tone, and then being able to apply extensions as well as keeping up with the inversions.

The chord shapes themselves are actually quite easy to play. It's pretty convenient to have them all worked out to fit over exactly 4 strings. Give a few of them a try and you might like it.

I can play Giant Steps by John Coltrane using chords instead of a single note melody. That is pretty dang useful


I have told you before. I understand your tuning system and its benefits. I prefer standard tuning.

I have yet to encounter a piece that I could not play in chords rather than melody. Some grips are a bit more difficult than others, but the geometry of standard tuning I find is far superior. That said, I never tried to play giant steps, either. That sort of music doesn't interest me. It neglects the key too much for my taste. John Coltrane was great at what he did, a master saxophonist, and I think a revolutionary Jazz artist, part of a revolution, anyway. But I don't like that style, personally. Not from a musical standpoint. It's too all over the place for me.

You do what you do, and you make the music you make, and I'll do what I do and I'll make the music I make. I hope you make cool music I can listen to. Your tuning system is not for me. I believe it to be limiting. If you don't, then use your tuning system, I don't care. But it's a waste of your time to try and convince me. I can guitar pretty good already with my tuning system the way it is, and I enjoy the advantages it provides me. I feel they are worth the shortcomings in comparison to your method. That's why I explored your method, and then gave up on it a long time ago. Because it had features I thought were appealing on the outside looking in, but after having tried it, I discovered they came at a cost that I was not willing to concede.

That's me, you can do whatever you want. We don't have to be the same. I would be interested to see what sort of music your system lets you do, but I'm not interested in any of your reasoning as to why you think I should adopt it.

I understand what you did. It's not a complicated concept. It's just not for me. Nothing you ever say will change that. I have my approach to guitar, and my of playing it. I like that. I won't give it up.

This made me think of you though, and imo, looks very awesome, and I'd very much like to try one. I'd have to try it first, but it would be something I would be interested in.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cK4REjqGc9w

Your tuning system on guitar though. I'm not interested in. I know what it is. I know you think that can't be possible because if I did I would have to agree with you because it's so awesome, but I disagree with you, for how I want to play guitar. I like how guitar works for me.

If you develop a system that's like that piano, that makes every note look like it is from an absolute point of view, like a C always looks like a C, just like how it is on a piano, then I'm interested. But for me, your tuning thing is a step backwards. You can't fathom that, I get it, but to me it is. I believe it is, and I will do what I believe is best, and I'll make the music I want to make. I won't try to convince you, but I like the geometry better in the long run. There is no reasoning behind it other than that. I find the pattern is a more powerful shape that way for the shape of our hands. You think differently, so tune your guitar differently, I don't care.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Mar 17, 2016,
#35
I wasnt really trying to convince anyone, I was just trying to help someone find more information on guitar chords.

EDIT: However, I did post a youtube video, it is in my signature. I'm not trying to cinvince anyone in particular to do something they arent comfortable doing. I just want to spread the information I have learned because thats just what I like to do. I will defend myself if I have to. I think it would be rather difficult to perform the piece in my signature in standard tuning.
Last edited by jrcsgtpeppers at Mar 17, 2016,
#36
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
I wasnt really trying to convince anyone, I was just trying to help someone find more information on guitar chords.

EDIT: However, I did post a youtube video, it is in my signature. I'm not trying to cinvince anyone in particular to do something they arent comfortable doing. I just want to spread the information I have learned because thats just what I like to do. I will defend myself if I have to. I think it would be rather difficult to perform the piece in my signature in standard tuning.


There are things that will be difficult in your tuning, that are easier in standard and vice versa. That's always the way.

I'm not interested in playing what's in your video. I'm interested in playing what's in mine. But keep doing what you're doing, and practicing what you are practicing, and maybe it will amount to something cool.

Right now, you might be able to play those shapes, but your timing is still off.

Some shapes of some grips are easier than others for quick access. They way you need to reset your fingers and stuff like that all matters. The specific geometry makes a difference. I like the standard geometry.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Mar 17, 2016,