#2
Serious question?? A 12 string guitar is played just like a normal 6 string. It's just 6 sets of 2 strings tuned to the same notes as a 6 string. The top 4 sets are octaves and the bottom two (b and high e) are unisons.
#4
Occasionally they're tuned lower than a 6-string (to make them less tough to play), but yes they have the same range.
In standard tuning, the lowest note is still E. The octave strings are tuned higher than their pairs (EADG), not lower.

I.e., music for them is still written in treble clef, and transposed by an octave same as normal guitar (middle C is written in 3rd space up). If notating a line written for the strings in octave pairs, I don't think you'd need to write the octave note, just the usual note of the thicker string.
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 8, 2016,
#5
Why are you asking? Is your decision of getting one dependent on that or what?

But yeah, as the other guys have said, it is notated the same way as a normal 6 string guitar.
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#6
One thing to consider: the strings are not independent of each other. People only write four strings on a mandolin, four on an 8-string bass with strings near each other (not à la Tosin Abasi).

There are many more examples, but writing extra strings when they're not independent is not just needless space used, it's also ambiguous and confusing.
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lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
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you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#7
Quote by jongtr
Occasionally they're tuned lower than a 6-string (to make them less tough to play), but yes they have the same range.


And even then, it's only like a step down.
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#8
Quote by theogonia777
And even then, it's only like a step down.
I used to know a guy who tuned two whole steps down.
Blind Willie McTell did that too, and even lower on occasion.
#9
Quote by austin.rivera.1
Does the 12 string guitar read bass and treble clef?
Actually, I've never run across a guitar, let alone a 12 string which could read music. Ba, dump, dump.

However, the guitar would be read across two staffs if it were a piano.


"C4", or, "middle C", is on a line between the F and G clefs with respect to being played on a piano or organ. With music specifically written for guitar, C4 is on the 2nd space below the top line of the G clef. On a piano, that note would be "high C", Or "C5".

The most basic reason for two clef signs with a piano, is the F, or bass clef is the left hand, while the G or treble clef is the right.

So, the guitar sounds an octave lower than it is written. When considered from the E-6 string to the e-1 string (both open, with range & absolute pitch being 2 octaves from E2 to E4), the guitar is a baritone instrument. Yes I know there are "baritone guitars". That's another story altogether.

Reading music at different octaves off the G clef is a technique also valuable for singers. A soprano would read the notes at the octave written, and a baritone would read an octave lower, exactly the same as a guitar.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 11, 2016,
#10
^Nailed it.

For the confused about transposing, the open strings are here.

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"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#11
^ with the unsaid implication that notation is still 8va concert.

Maybe guitarists should make like cellists and learn three clefs
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something