#1
My guitar and bass amps are at a bandmates house. So, I've gotten creative and have been playing guitar and bass through my home theater system.

Guitar > effects pedals > 1/4" splitter > dual 1/4" to RCA adapter > 50 watt A/V Audio amp > 5.1 system

It sounds surprisingly GREAT. Before I got the splitter, I was only playing in Mono (left speaker only), and it was still good. In fact I'm thinking about replacing my cheapo home audio setup, and upgrading to a much better, and higher wattage 5.1 system. Perfect for home.

The small speakers kick ass, and there's plenty of headroom for guitar. Not so much for bass. But the 6" sub gets low low lowwwww.

Only downsides I see:
Bass is quiet, and needs to use quite a bit of the 50 watts (understandable)
Cannot gig with this, or practice with rest of band.


Anyone else do this? What are the thoughts on this? I have a great MXR 10-band Equalizer that I prefer more than any of my amps' EQ's... And the rest of the effects and sounds, I rely on the pedals, never the amp.
#2
I'm intrigued by this. When a friend bought a guitar of mine and didn't have an amp we connected the guitar through some cheapo micro amp to his sound system and it sounded all right, but he never used it after that. I've always wondered about using a good sound speaker and what makes a guitar amp speaker different or more suited for guitar.
#3
I don't own an amp. I just plug my electric into my PS4 and fire up Rocksmith 2014. I use my home theater for an "amp", and it sounds 100% kickass.
#4
Quote by dthmtl3
I'm intrigued by this. When a friend bought a guitar of mine and didn't have an amp we connected the guitar through some cheapo micro amp to his sound system and it sounded all right, but he never used it after that. I've always wondered about using a good sound speaker and what makes a guitar amp speaker different or more suited for guitar.


I think tradition more than anything has dictated guitar amp speakers and cabinets.

Generally electric guitars are pretty well confined to a specific frequency range which is heavily oriented toward mids. So amp makers really didn't spend a lot of time and money designing cabinets and speakers that were efficient at producing a full range of frequencies like a stereo system.

The fact is the vast majority of guitar amp cabinets are pretty rudimentary designs when compared to state of the art audio, pro audio, and live PA speakers. This has prompted many people, including myself, to move to full range flat response (FRFR) type powered speakers for live perfomances. It's really not about getting more frequency range for the guitar, but gaining the efficiency, clarity and articulation that a FRFR speaker can provide...in effect getting rid of the mushiness.

You'll notice the same effect if you have a home studio setup that uses pro audio speakers which use much of the same type of design as do powered PA speakers.
#5
I've played it through my car stereo like that. I've got a little $5 female to male 3.5 adapter and just plug it in. TBH it sounds like reheated guano but it works in a pinch and it's a handy way to test the electronics in a guitar I might be looking to buy or trade from someone.
#6
In general an amplifier is an amplifier and speakers are speakers - except when you decide to overdrive the signal in the amplifier. Then the amplifier distorts and the speakers, which were selected expecting the amplifier to remain in its linear (undistorted) range, get far more energy in certain frequencies than their design can tolerate. That can sound bad, and damage the speakers (usually the tweeters get more energy with distorted signals than their rating). If you play too loud in bass frequencies the excursions can damage the woofers.

Otherwise, if you like the tone you are getting *and* you get distortion from an effects unit and *not* from the amplifier/speaker system itself, then go for it and enjoy.
#7
I had to sell my amp when I moved to Alberta, so I picked up a line 6 POD with the floorboard and play through headphones or my 5.1 surround. It does the job for at home jamming and practice.
#9
I use recording monitors with bias fx on ios. (Yamaha hsm-5). Also with headphones. Sounds very good, though a tube amp would be best if I could play loud
We're just a battery for hire with the guitar fire
Ready and aimed at you
Pick up your balls and load up your cannon
For a twenty one gun salute
For those about to rock, FIRE!
We salute you
#10
Quote by 21GunSalute
I use recording monitors with bias fx on ios. (Yamaha hsm-5). Also with headphones. Sounds very good, though a tube amp would be best if I could play loud


I have a small office and the 212 tube amp was taking up too much room. guitar-->pedals--> audio interface --> studio monitors or headphones sounds pretty good for just practicing. Not as full as the 212, but that is always out in the main basement for when I want to crank it up.