#1
Hopefully someone can suggest a way to get jumping over the fret board sorted.

I'm happy with the pentatonic and all the patterns, I can play up and down the neck from one shape to another. (1,2,3 etc)

The area I'm struggling with is jumping from pattern 1 to pattern 3 (missing 2) or from 4 to 2.

Any tips other than just stick at it or any suitable exercises, I seem to have hit a wall.

Cheers,

MT
#2
Instead of just learning the patterns as shapes and fret numbers, I'd recommend you focus on learning what notes you're actually playing, and then focusing on memorizing where those notes occur up and down the fret-board. That's what will allow you to, say, jump from playing a lead line high up the neck down to a rhythmic phrase low on the neck without getting lost.

Edit: For example, an E minor pentatonic is E, G, A, B, D, E (octave), so, learning where those notes occur all along the fret-board will allow you to keep yourself "anchored" to "safe" notes, and move up an down the fret-board in a non-linear fashion. Same for the rest of the pentatonics, as well as every other scale.
I've got the spirit, but lose the feeling.
Last edited by intheshadowplay at Mar 10, 2016,
#4
Thanks for the reply.

I guess it's just going to come with practice.

I tried using the octave (from the 12th) however this was not intuitive.

I'll continue my learning of fretboard and also might start with jumping to roots.
Once I get one scale lets say C transposing to others should be fine.

But it seems that there is only one way to really get it dialled!

MT
#5
here is a nice pent 6/9 scale in the key of D--D E F# A B...starting at the 5th fret: string-fret(s)

E-5 7
A-5 7
D-4 7
G-4 7
B-5 7
E-5 7

now lets form chords from this scale-again: String-Fret

E-5
A-5
D-4
-------
E-7 (try barring chord with pinky)
A-7
D-7
-------
A-5
D-4
G-4
-------
A-7
D-7
G-7
------
D-4
G-4
B-5
------
D-7
G-7
B-7
-------
G-4
B-5
E-5
-------
G-7
B-7
E-7
-------

try this in several keys-then mix and match the keys..scales and chords..try it in fourths and fifths D to G to C to F etc...once you get the scales and chords under your fingers try making some chord runs with them..experiment and see what sounds good...then try the same scale as a minor 6/9..and the chords...

hope this helps
play well

wolf
#6
I think an important question to ask yourself here is "Why do you want to do this?".

Remember, all your technique and practice is simply a means to an end, which is playing music on your guitar. As far as I can see there's not a lot of benefit in working specifically on being able to "jump" between positions as you're describing - because I can't, off the top of my head, think of a lot of music I've heard where you'd need to do it.

It kind of suggests you're perhaps thinking of music "upside down", as in "I need to be able to jump between positions to play something interesting", rather than "I know what I want to hear, where do I need to go to play it". The reason a lot of stuff transitions between two adjacent patterns is because we like to listen to smooth transitions - make the intervals too wide and it can sound a bit jarring or disjointed.

If a piece of music does "jump" a couple of scale patterns it's important to understand that wasn't the driving factor behind the decision to move. It was simply the most practical way to reach the next note, but even then they're more likely moving to follow a chord shape rather than a pentatonic pattern.

For intervals larger than an octave most of the time it's simply going to be more practical to do that vertically with string-skipping, whilst for tapping you really want to be focussing more on arpeggios than scale patterns. Obviously if this is something that's going to have a real practical benefit, either because it fits the music you write or the kind of stuff you listen to, then it's worth working on. However if you just want to get better at moving around the fretboard then there's more beneficial things for you to focus your energy and attention on.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#7
I agree with Steven. I don't think that this is a desperately important thing to master. There is so much for us all to do as musicians, which is much more important. If you really do want to improve on this I'd say that the solution is simply repetition, try to constantly switch between pairs of shapes but do be sure to repeat this in all keys so you are forced to visualise each shape.
#8
Cheers SS.

Your response struck a chord with me.

I'm just going to enjoy playing and see where it goes.