#1
Hi guys,

I recently got an Epiphone Les Paul Standard for a mark-down price (£155, down from £319) on account of a small crack on the neck by the headstock. Upon receiving the guitar, it plays great and there are no other faults with it. The crack in question is actually not that bad at all, but obviously it's best to treat it before it has the chance to get worse.

What would be the best method of fixing this up?

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#2
Is it just in the finish or down to the wood?
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#3
It looks to me like it's just a hairline crack, but nonetheless I'd like to fix it up somehow.
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#4
There's not much you can do then other than sand it down and repaint and refinish, since the crack will be too small to insert a needle down to squirt with some kind of lacquer and fix that way.

It's going to either very time consuming for you, or expensive relative to the value of the instrument to get it fixed.

I would just do it myself, as saving the money for the crack then paying a butt ton of cash to get it fixed is obviously counter intuitive.
My Gear:
Ibanez Jet King 2
Ibanez RGDIX7 MPB
Ibanez GRG 7221
OLP John Petrucci
Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
Squier Stratocaster (modified)
Harley Benton CLD-41S (Acoustic)

Peavey Vypyr 30.

Boss CH-1 Super Chorus
Boss DD-3 Digital Delay
Boss FRV-1 '63 Fender Reverb
#5
Actually I would just leave it. It will be easier to fix when it gets worse, as backwards as that sounds
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#6
Quote by jwmcdaniel97
Actually I would just leave it. It will be easier to fix when it gets worse, as backwards as that sounds


But "worse" in this case is gonna be "broken and unplayable." It's the exact same place I had a crack in my LP Studio that I ended up repairing 3 times because the entire headstock just snapped there
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#7
That crack is in the worst possible place for an LP, and honestly, I'd take it back.
#8
Quote by kumamilesbear
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I recently got an Epiphone Les Paul Standard for a mark-down price (£155, down from £319) on account of a small crack on the neck by the headstock.
Actually I would just leave it. It will be easier to fix when it gets worse, as backwards as that sounds
But "worse" in this case is gonna be "broken and unplayable." It's the exact same place I had a crack in my LP Studio that I ended up repairing 3 times because the entire headstock just snapped there

So you knew it could get significantly worse when you bought it?
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#10
I have exactly the same crack on my Epiphone LP . I got it cheap like you did because of that crack. I have had this guitar for almost five years. I bought mine used also so it is much older than that. It has never given me an issue and it's high enough that it isn't under my hand. It has great action and sound and while I was apprenticing with an expert Les Paul luthier last year (he was Les Paul's guitar tech for more than 40 years). He looked at it and thought it might be a neck crack but as long as it was solid (and it is) there is no reason to mess with it. The truss works fine so when it becomes a problem I'll fix it.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Mar 13, 2016,
#11
Quote by Tony Done
Yes, a bad spot. Is it a headstock scarf joint coming loose? - I don't know how those necks are made.


I'm not sure about Epis, but I'd be nervous enough to have a good tech look at it. And I definitely wouldn't have bought it in the first place; it's just too suspect. It's exactly where LP necks always break.

#12
Yes it's not uncommon for these cracks on Les Paul's. It's one reason some people will insist a scarf joint is better than a one piece neck on a Les Paul. I haven't had it happened and don't know anyone personally that has had it happen but I watched one being fixed last year and I have heard about it and seen plenty of pictures on the internet.

The one I have with what looks like a crack and probably is, was my first Epiphone Les Paul. I got it very cheap in otherwise very good condition for $180 with a case from a private seller. At the time I didn't know about the rather infamous Gibson neck cracks and thought it might just be a scratch. It looks worse now only because I have chipped away some of the edges around the finish hoping to see down to the wood. I have played that guitar many times on gigs for a few years so it has paid for itself many times over. It did show me how good some of these Epi Les Paul modals are. I now own three others and love them.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Mar 14, 2016,
#13
Without knowing how deep it is there isn't much to be done. My SG Faded has a crack like that after falling off the stand, it was wide enough to work epoxy into it and it's been fine ever since. The Faded finish is already pretty bare bones so I just sanded down the spot where I repaired it and used one of those furniture markers in cherry to cover up the bare area.

Because of the finish on the Epi and the ambiguity of the crack, the repair job will most likely be much more involved and possibly for no real structural benefit. If you can't live with it or are worried about more damage, I'd take it back. Otherwise, nothing to do but wait or sand down the finish so you can see what's going on.
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#14
Maybe the best question to ask would be how much it would be to fix the headstock if/when it should break all the way through. *That's* the amount that should have been taken off the guitar's purchase price. Some folks glue them back together, some have a good tech fix it so well that you really can't tell it was ever broken. If the amount it would cost to fix it if it completely breaks is okay with you, then carry on.

I've seen one guitar come apart on stage. The guy was playing, then suddenly noticed that his strings were looser and that he was VERY out of tune. It took a bit before he glanced up at his headstock in horror. In his case, however, he really never had any indication that it was damaged; he says it was fine and then just died.
#16
Quote by jwmcdaniel97
Actually I would just leave it. It will be easier to fix when it gets worse, as backwards as that sounds



I sort of agree with this. The only way to properly fix the neck is to carefully finish braking off the headstock so that you can put some undiluted wood glue in there and glue it on properly. DO NOT do as some have suggested and inject glue using a needle as this will ultimately make actually fixing it properly either difficult or impossible depending on the type of glue you use. A hairline crack that isn't opening AT ALL and isn't causing tuning issues isn't going to cause any real problems while you are playing. I've seen guitars with cracks like that that have been played without issue for 10 or more years. The danger in leaving it is that it is more likely to fail entirely if the guitar falls over, slips off the strap, or it's headstock is bumped into something like an amp or a wall. The bright side is that if it does break off, you would have had to break it off anyway so that you could fix it. The downside is that if it does break off, it's not going to be a carefully controlled break so it is likely to be more complicated to fix.

A silver lining to this cloud is that it is actually very simple to fix and their are a lot of tutorials online. Frank Fords website www.frets.com used to have a wonderful tutorial about this and it is probably still there. The hardest part of fixing it is gaining the courage to finish the break. 2nd hardest part of fixing it is actually setting up your guitar afterwords. The actual fix is easy on should only require a couple block of wood, some clamps, a saw, and some glue all of which are things that most people have easy access to.
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at Mar 16, 2016,
#17
Id start like putting duct tape on it....or like gluing the hell out of it. Some people put two bolts in that place to hold it in.

Honestly i don't care what my guitar looks like tho and yea....some fucking duct tape to hold it in place lmao.

But that fucking sucks tho. I cant believe this shit happens to a lot of les paul type guitars. I have one and i have nightmares sometimes of this happening.

Did you ding it or drop it? Im super careful with my guitars. None of em have any dings AT ALL. I have a 16 year old guitar which ive had in my possession for 10 years at least. Not gonna count but you can guess thats a long time and it has ZERO dings and ZERO faults. And it fucking plays like a dream. Better intonation than a stock PRS lol. Every note is SPOT ON because im a boss at intonation.....yea .... lol


Anyways heres an idea.....buy another guitar? Sometimes its time to say goodbye. Like fixing a broken beat up old car. The expenses over the years will add up to having paid payments on a new car. Just get what works good and dont fucking try to save a thing that will clearly keep breaking.

Better yet time to get a strat!
#18
Old thread.
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