#1
Hello I'm new here,


I got a problem. I love playing guitar but as the title gives away I suck at playing along with other people/music. And for me that's what's music is all about. I've been playing guitar for about 6 year maybe a little longer. My buddies think i can play fine so do my parents etc. i've put a lot of time into learning how to solo, being creative and singing along with my playing. i did learn songs but i never learned how to play them exactly, i just learned the chords and some cool stuff to do (for example one of the riffs) and i jammed and sung to it which was a lot of fun for me for a long time. i just adjusted the songs so i could play them . i had a hard time playing songs exactly like the record so i didn't put much time into that .

i've never been in bands, my highschool friends didn't share my musical preferences. After highschool i started hanging out with more people who could play instruments, and most of them thought icould play good, (when iplayed alone). But playing with others people was always difficult, i had hard time keeping rhythm (even simple chord progressions, iwould miss a chord or change my tempo). it sucked. Over the years ikept playing more difficult stuff on my own, hendrix songs, cool blues licks, imainly listen to people who don't play their songs twice in the the same way so i could hide behind that :p.

about a year and half ago i got really into blues and ifound this godlike guitar player who teaches me. He invited me to his bluesjams and it is awesome. i can be on a stage a play with other people, for other people (something ive always wanted to do). My solos are good, but my rhythm sucks. i really can play the 12 bars, but i just fuck up for no reason. My teacher noticed that ihad troubles tapping my foot along with the music, what's that about (any tips)?

Anyways i d really like to play in a band, but i can't because can't play correctly. What im trying now is itook a random album (something not to difficult, whatever people say iam arctic monkeys) and im trying to play it exactly along with the record. it takes a long time for to play one song and when ican play it i still sometimes randomly strike a wrong chord even when im like in the zone. What do i do?

Do i just have bad musical memory, bad rhymth and a concentration problem or is it something i can actually practise? :p
(i do not mind putting a lot of effort into practicing :p)
#2
You probably play fine. I'll bet you just play more than you think you need to. In a blues situation you can take it easy and just hit the two and four beat with single down strokes. 1-hit-3-hit. Most times it works well and in blues, less is almost always better.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#4
I'd recommend looking up backing tracks on YouTube and playing/riffing along to give you a feel for playing with others without worrying about embarrassing yourself. I tend to play a lot better alone, which is why I switched to a solo genre. I feel like most musicians play better alone because they can pay attention to what they're doing without worrying about staying in tune/time with the rest. It's just kinda something you have to work at, there's no set of things you can do that'll magically make you be able to
#5
Learning to play well with a band is something that you learn over a fairly long period of time. It's particularly hard if you've played alone for a long period of time as you have. The reason is that playing solo doesn't require a lot of discipline. It's all on you and you can go wherever you want to go with the music. In a band setting you not only have to listen to what others are playing and fit in with it, but you have to also remain aware of where the song is going and anticipate the movements. In effect, your attention is divided.

The good news is, as others have stated, when playing in a band you don't have to play as much as you do when you play solo. You can simplify your part which takes less concentration which can then be used to listen and anticipate. It's one part skill and two parts mental discipline.

Although this sounds straightforward enough, there are some people that truly get "carried away" with the music. They begin to just groove to the sound and forget they're there to do a job. We have a soundman that struggles with this and I constantly have to remind him he's got to keep his concentration on what's happening on-stage with the music.

I'd go along with some of the recommendations here and start playing along to backing tracks or playing along to regular commercial tracks. But approach it as a technician and not as a listener. When you play in a band you're no longer part of the audience. You don't have the luxury of just enjoying the music. You have a job to do and you need to concentrate on it.
#7
Here's my "old timers" advice. When I started playing in the mid 60's) everyone started by learning chords and playing rhythm. Unless the song was an instrumental like the Ventures or Dick Dale etc., leads were just some filler for eight measures in the middle of the song. Look at bands from the 60's when the musicians were actually labelled as "rhythm guitar" and "lead guitar". Early Beatles albums label John as "rhythm" and George as "lead guitar". Then along came Hendrix, Clapton (Cream era) and Jeff Beck (Yardbirds era) and that changed everything. Playing leads took on a whole different approach and in a lot of case like Hendrix and Clapton in Cream one guitarist served both rolls.

My point is that playing rhythm was the primary thing guitar players generally learned when they first started to play. It was usually done to accompany a vocal. Today playing good solid rhythm guitar has somehow taken a back seat to learning how to play solo's and power chords. The art of playing good solid rhythm has been a littlee lost these days so don't feel awkward if your rhytum abilities are a little lacking.

My advice is get a copy of Creedence greatest hits and learn to play those rhythm parts. They are tight. solid and the essence of great rhythm playing. Just keep playing full chords not partial "power chords" and make it simple. Like other says, use a metronome till it starts happening naturally. There are many free online metronomes.

https://www.metronomeonline.com/

One last thing, practice with a clean setting. No overdrive or distortion.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Mar 16, 2016,
#8
Playing by yourself can be an issue if wanting to play with others. You tend to have a lot of nothing that you try to fill. It isn't such an issue if just playing with drums and bass, but more than that you can make yourself very unpopular.

Don't worry about learning songs perfectly. It is better to have a wide selection of songs in your library so that way both you and your compatriots may know the same song, even if in part.

Get a looper. A band mate on your pedal board. It tightens your rythum and you get more of a feel for multiple parts. You also get to learn the chord progression and backing. Nothing like laying down three minutes of chords on you base track, and coking up the last sequence, to encourage you to do it properly. And you learn not to over play.
Please note: The above comments are based on my experience, and may represent my perception of that experience. This may not be accurate and, subject to the style of music you play, may be irrelevant or wrong.
#9
Part of the issue with playing with other musicians is having variations on what you can play. For example, if you're jamming on Dminor7, Aminor 7 for ten minutes, you don't want to play the same rhythms and chord shapes the entire time or it will get boring. This app is really good for learning lots of variations of chords, and understanding the music theory behind them so you can better understand what you're playing around the entire fretboard.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/guitar-handbook/id1059621385?mt=8

It's free.
#10
you need to learn to follow the drums. when playing yourself you tend to follow the guitar player on the record or no one both of which can get you into trouble in a band situation. if you follow the beat and understand where they fall in the song you'll do fine. takes some practice and if you really don't play with others then a open blues jam can certainly be a disaster. jams require you to be able to follow the changes at least. if you can't then bad things happen fast.

as someone mentioned backing tracks can be good but turn the drums up and the rest down and learn to follow the drums. this will help with timing as well.
#11
I'll talk about my experience:

Trust in your band. I used to think and pay attention in ALL instruments while I was playing... if someone made a mistake, I could try to fix it. But it actually took my concentration. So, you have to pick the tempo of the music correctly and then focus in what you are doing.

But playing alive is always harder to me. You just get used to it and have meshing. Meshing is always essential
#12
Quote by IgorFerra
I'll talk about my experience:

Trust in your band. I used to think and pay attention in ALL instruments while I was playing... if someone made a mistake, I could try to fix it. But it actually took my concentration. So, you have to pick the tempo of the music correctly and then focus in what you are doing.

But playing alive is always harder to me. You just get used to it and have meshing. Meshing is always essential


I used to have the opposite problem I learned quickly to focus on and follow the drums, my issue was if I missed a chord I could stop and jump back in on the next measure no problem but when I stopped waiting for the right time to reenter everyone else would stop! I used to get so frustrated and tell them "if someone falls out just keep trucking they will jump back in
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#14
Quote by monwobobbo
you need to learn to follow the drums. when playing yourself you tend to follow the guitar player on the record or no one both of which can get you into trouble in a band situation. if you follow the beat and understand where they fall in the song you'll do fine. takes some practice and if you really don't play with others then a open blues jam can certainly be a disaster. jams require you to be able to follow the changes at least. if you can't then bad things happen fast.

as someone mentioned backing tracks can be good but turn the drums up and the rest down and learn to follow the drums. this will help with timing as well.


Hey man thanks for the tip.

Is there like a program with which can put the drum of the songs i'm playing louder?
i don't have a mixing panel or any thing, i only have this trusty old laptop and a decent headset.