#1
I am returning to guitar after a long time away. I don't even have an amp any more. I was just looking around and it seemed to me that, someday, I will probably want to do something really simple like record my own backing tracks. I really have no need for a good MIC input at this time.

I found the Lexicon Alpha to be really inexpensive and (I assumed) that with my Win7 laptop (relatively high end), not that bad Bose bluetooth speaker, plus the Alpha I would now have something that would do the job of an amplifier in my den/bedroom.

BUT - am I going to have a latency problem here? I know roughly zero about VST. Is this a problem?

Thanks.

dave
#2
If you are working with a few tracks latency shouldn't be much of an issue. Read the reviews on the Lexicon though, it has been kinda patchy, although from what I see most of the negative reviews are caused by ignorance than the hardware's fault.
#4
I have had a Lexicon Alpha for about 6 years and it works fine. I was using it until about six months ago when I changed it for a bigger Tascam that had more inputs and was on sale. The Lexicon works fine though and if I hadn't seen the Tascam on such a good sale I would still be using the Lexicon.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#5
Rick, thank you.

A related general question. There are probably a good number of folks here that have reasonably sophisticated 'studio' capabilities that they just use for their own creative pleasures. Assume that you have that kind of setup at home and just want to do some practice. Would you typically plug your guitar into an amp or would you just 'amp it' through your studio system since that is how you are most typically connected.

Just curious.

dave
#6
Dave, I'll answer - whatever you feel like doing. Sometimes you want to blast an amp, other times you have to be quiet.
Sometimes you want to be portable and grab an old hardware recorder.
Yesterday I dusted off an old preamp and put it through IRs in the box as I couldn't crank it, today I'll reamp through my tube amps what I recorder last night.
#7
diabolical - thank you.

I was just checking to be sure that (typically) there are not 'other considerations here' (beyond the ones that you listed) which is what I expected.

dave
#8
Well, most bedroom producers nowadays do it all in the box, some go to elaborate pains to buy cabinet emulators and other equipment like Axe-Fx, Kemper to make it sound like a real amp, for the most part all the while their real amps sit and gather dust or are used as preamp feeds into their DAW.
Amp miking is not so complicated as some on this and other forums make it out to be, for example I visit the sevenstringforum and over there it is made into a dark art, while it is quite simple
#9
Quote by diabolical
Well, most bedroom producers nowadays do it all in the box, some go to elaborate pains to buy cabinet emulators and other equipment like Axe-Fx, Kemper to make it sound like a real amp, for the most part all the while their real amps sit and gather dust or are used as preamp feeds into their DAW.
Amp miking is not so complicated as some on this and other forums make it out to be, for example I visit the sevenstringforum and over there it is made into a dark art, while it is quite simple


Are you like me and just slam a 57 or a 421 onto a cab and move it around until it works?

My workflow is to use AmpSims and impulses to get the structure and feel of a song set, then reamp the guitars or retrack as needed. It's not often I'll track piecemeal with a real amp. But, sometimes I just want to crank an amp and capture that raw, guttural playing.

The big problem in the last number of years (and I've fallen victim to it as well) is knowing when to leave something well enough alone and say "That's it, song's done".
Quote by Watterboy
Do you have any dilithium crystals or fresh warm dumps for sale
#10
Quote by the chemist
Are you like me and just slam a 57 or a 421 onto a cab and move it around until it works?

My workflow is to use AmpSims and impulses to get the structure and feel of a song set, then reamp the guitars or retrack as needed. It's not often I'll track piecemeal with a real amp. But, sometimes I just want to crank an amp and capture that raw, guttural playing.

The big problem in the last number of years (and I've fallen victim to it as well) is knowing when to leave something well enough alone and say "That's it, song's done".

Right on! I have a defined mike technique but lets face it - a SM57 and a Youtube video how to mic a cab will pretty much get any noob on the way.

saying "done" on a project has become more and more complicated in the digital age. Every once in a while I might go to some old demo thinking I can do it better, spend two days remixing and give up as the original still sounds better