Page 1 of 8
#1


Pt 1.

They finished welding the Orion module back in January. That's the vessel that the chosen astronauts will land on he surface of the red planet.

March 1st, we brought home Scott Kelly and his two cosmonaut counterparts after nearly a full year in space, wrapping up the data collection portion of learning what long-term space travel does to the body.

We continue to learn more every day. The picture above is from the rover Opportunity photographing in the Endeavor Valley. Last week it celebrated 12 years upon Mars; an astounding anniversary when you consider scientists thought it would only last for 90 days.


Pt. 2

We had better buckle the fuck up and make this a priority in our social consciousness. This will be a defining moment for all of us.

When we read back one hundred years we are amazed at the heroism of those in the first world war, the invention of flight, the refining of mass industry. In another one hundred years I would be ashamed if our couple sets of decades were defined by hashtag slogans about clouded and overly-political social justice movements that look for more problems than exist.

I want there to be a kid, in whom extra-atmospherical travel is attainable, to read back and think, "Man, that was a big deal."

I want to be alive when the world collectively comes to realize that we, as humans, are interplanetary.

We're going to Mars.

http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-orion-flight-test-and-the-journey-to-mars
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
Last edited by JustRooster at Mar 16, 2016,
#2
Quote by JustRooster


Pt 1.

They finished welding the Orion module back in January. That's the vessel that the chosen astronauts will land on he surface of the red planet.

March 1st, we brought home Scott Kelly and his two cosmonaut counterparts after nearly a full year in space, wrapping up the data collection portion of learning what long-term space travel does to the body.

We continue to learn more every day. The picture above is from the rover Opportunity photographing in the Endeavor Valley. Last week it celebrated 12 years upon Mars; an astounding anniversary when you consider scientists thought it would only last for 90 days.


Pt. 2

We better buckle the fuck up and make this a priority in our social consciousness. This will be a defining moment for all of us.

When we read back one hundred years we are amazed at the heroism of those in the first world war, the invention of flight, the refining of mass industry. In another one hundred years I would be ashamed if our couple sets of decades were defined by hashtag slogans about clouded and overly-political social justice movements that look for more problems than exist.

I want there to be a kid, in whom extra-atmospherical travel is attainable, to read back and think, "Man, that was a big deal."

I want to be alive when the world collectively comes to realize that we, as humans, are interplanetary.

We're going to Mars.

http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-orion-flight-test-and-the-journey-to-mars


I can't even give this enough thumbs up!
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#6
Outstanding post. The very idea of this mission, or pretty much any space mission, blows my mind. Stuff like this needs to be more at the forefront of the media.
My old signature was too long. Have a daisy.

#7
It's one thing to talk about it, but when you work night shift like I do and see it in the starry sky as a mere, tiny little dot almost every morning, knowing we'll one day walk on it, it's really just mind blowing.
#8
Sounds rad.

Now, can someone named Dave comment so I can reference the only Sci-Fi movie worth referencing?

(or actually make that one of two movies, and add Captain Stern or John Candy as a sexually proficient robot)
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#9
This is too awesome, but I feel slightly saddened as well in thinking that in the far flung future space travel may well become common place and taken for granted when so many of us stand on terra firma staring up at the stars and dreaming of travelling among them.

Who knows, maybe I will get that chance at some point in life.
#11
Rooster, just to let you know I've copied your OP wholesale and put it on another forum I go on, making it clear I didn't write it. I just thought it was really well put. Hope you don't mind.
My old signature was too long. Have a daisy.

#12
Quote by RAB11
Rooster, just to let you know I've copied your OP wholesale and put it on another forum I go on, making it clear I didn't write it. I just thought it was really well put. Hope you don't mind.



OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#13
Update:

The idiots on the other forum don't give a shit.
My old signature was too long. Have a daisy.

#14
We already got to Mars August, 1999.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#15
Quote by theogonia777
We already got to Mars August, 1999.


Bradbury would be proud that you remember.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#16
we're going to fucking mars!
Eat your pheasant
Drink your wine
Your days are numbered, bourgeois swine!
#17
Quote by Arby911
Bradbury would be proud that you remember.


First Expedition: Never Forget
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#18
Very exciting, sure, but if I read correctly this won't actually be happening until the 2030s?
#19
Quote by matt bickerton
Very exciting, sure, but if I read correctly this won't actually be happening until the 2030s?


That was just in a later edition that they changed the dates to 31 years in the future.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#20
Quote by matt bickerton
Very exciting, sure, but if I read correctly this won't actually be happening until the 2030s?


It won't, but that's really not that far off. Think about how recent the 1990s seem. That's how far away the 2030s are. No time at all really.
My old signature was too long. Have a daisy.

#21
Still need the SLS (and then a later mod. of it), test flights of Orion, etc.

Here's my beef. Despite internet popularity, despite the obsession with Neil de Grasse Tyson, despite the amount of SpaceX articles that get spammed, the US continues to have a shrinking and aging aerospace workforce, as well as one of the worst rates of PhD level engineering/aerospace graduates, paling in comparison to competitive countries with burgeoning spacefaring capabilities (China? Singapore? Japan?).

If all of these casual internet space enthusiasts really care about American spacefaring capacity, they would support an increase in the education sector of STEM programs and outreach, and/or directly participate in the field itself.

edit: also

Quote by JustRooster
extra-atmospherical
The word you are looking for is exoatmospheric lol
My God, it's full of stars!
#25
Quote by Dreadnought
they would support an increase in the education sector of STEM programs and outreach

How do you do that?
#26
The same way you get anything done in educational institutions? Can't tell if you're legitimately asking or being tongue-in-cheek to some degree.

Support/fund outreach programs, actually enroll in a relevant degree or career path, write your congress members and other elected representatives, vote for candidates who express an interest in the topic (that one's pretty broad and outlandish tbf), fund S&T/R&D at the national and defense levels higher than in recent times, engage leadership in higher education institutions on the matter, etc
My God, it's full of stars!
#28
Florida is hot enough. Why would I want to go to another hot planet that takes 4-years to get to?
***************Sig***************
Taylor 314 & GS Mini & Martin LX1
#29
Quote by fingerguy
Florida is hot enough. Why would I want to go to another hot planet that takes 4-years to get to?


You might want to reconsider that sentence while examining a map of the solar system...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#30
Quote by fingerguy
Florida is hot enough. Why would I want to go to another hot planet that takes 4-years to get to?

Mars is significantly colder than Earth. Time to go back to elementary school.
Free Ali
#31
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
How do you do that?



Discourage gender studies


OT: A human astronaut to Mars will almost certainly die or suffer irreversible cosmic ray damage. I'd love to do it just to say "we did it", though.


Unfortunately, it is extremely unlikely mankind will ever leave this solar system. Physics just sucks like that.
Check out my band Disturbed
Last edited by StewieSwan at Mar 16, 2016,
#32
Quote by StewieSwan
Discourage gender studies


OT: A human astronaut to Mars will almost certainly die or suffer irreversible cosmic ray damage. I'd love to do it just to say "we did it", though.



IIRC, college had enough field-level gender studies to make any classroom version obsolete...

No inherent reason they would die, but the cosmic ray damage issue does need to be solved. Fortunately it's already being addressed.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#33
I find it amazing that we have rovers over there sending back pictures. I'd love to see a full on mars landing.
#34
Quote by StewieSwan
Discourage gender studies


OT: A human astronaut to Mars will almost certainly die or suffer irreversible cosmic ray damage. I'd love to do it just to say "we did it", though.


Unfortunately, it is extremely unlikely mankind will ever leave this solar system. Physics just sucks like that.

It all depends when they go and when(if) they come back. Because the sun goes through phases with increased activity, there are periods when it would be more dangerous to go.

According to this, yea, they'd be at an increased risk of cancer following the journey, but they'd not be like Chernobyl emergency worker sick.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#35
Quote by StewieSwan
Discourage gender studies

Never mind, now we're all stuck on this shithole. Thanks Stewie, you bastard.
#36
Quote by slapsymcdougal
It all depends when they go and when(if) they come back. Because the sun goes through phases with increased activity, there are periods when it would be more dangerous to go.

According to this, yea, they'd be at an increased risk of cancer following the journey, but they'd not be like Chernobyl emergency worker sick.


High solar activity would actually reduce the cosmic ray danger.

It's not the cancer that's the real concern, it's the reduction in mental faculty caused by loss of dendrites.

http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/1/4/e1400256.full
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#37
Quote by Arby911
High solar activity would actually reduce the cosmic ray danger.

It's not the cancer that's the real concern, it's the reduction in mental faculty caused by loss of dendrites.

http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/1/4/e1400256.full

They're going to be in microgravity, they can wear lead helmets the whole way.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#38
Quote by slapsymcdougal
They're going to be in microgravity, they can wear lead helmets the whole way.

Like Ant-Man?!?!
#39
Quote by ali.guitarkid7
Like Ant-Man?!?!

Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#40
Quote by Arby911
You might want to reconsider that sentence while examining a map of the solar system...

Wasn't being serious. Mars always looks like a hot desert to me. I know people on here really get off on being right so maybe such sarcasm isn't welcome on here.
***************Sig***************
Taylor 314 & GS Mini & Martin LX1