#1
Forgive me if this isn't the proper place to ask.

But I am wondering if anyone has a good source for what I'm seeking.

I'm wanting to know if such a thing exists where it shows chords and where you can alternatively play them on the fret board. If that makes sense..

For example instead of D chord on the regular spot, where you could play it elsewhere on the fret board and achieve the same chord.(Im wanting this type of diagram for as many chords as possible)

Thanks in advance guys
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#2
The easiest way to do it would be to learn all the basic major chord shapes (CAGED). They are all movable. Just know where the root of the shape is and know the notes on the fretboard (at least on the two lowest strings) and you can do that yourself pretty easily.

Another way is to know the interval structure of major and minor chords and you can build any major or minor chord starting from any note. Or know what notes there are in the D major chord (D F# A) and just find those notes on the fretboard.


The most common non-open D major shapes would be

x 5 4 2 3 2 (C shape)
x 5 7 7 7 5 (A shape)
10 12 12 11 10 10 (E shape)

And you don't always want to play full 6-string voicings. But all the smaller 3- or 4-string voicings are included in those. It's pretty common to only use your 2nd, 3rd and 4th or 1st, 2nd and 3rd strings to play chords, especially when you are playing with a full band. But if you know the full 6-string voicings, you also know the smaller 3-string voicings.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Mar 16, 2016,
#3
^ like fingerpickingood and MagaraMarine said the CAGED system is based around exactly this question.

The idea behind this system is that you can take any of the five major chords and move them up the neck. Each time you move the chord up a fret you increase it by one semitone.

Remember though that you also need to move the open strings up by refingering the open chord so that you can use your index finger to bar those notes.

E.g.


o---|---|---|---|---|
|-1-|---|---|---|---|
o---|---|---|---|---|
|---|-2-|---|---|---|
|---|---|-3-|---|---|
x---|---|---|---|---|
This is an open C major chord.  
The numbers represent the fingers that you normally use to grip this chord.

|---|-1-|---|---|---|
|---|---|-2-|---|---|
|---|-1-|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|-3-|---|
|---|---|---|---|-4-|
x---|---|---|---|---|
This is the C major chord SHAPE moved up two frets making it a D major chord.
The numbers represent the fingers you would use to play this chord.
It takes a bit of practice to get that pinky working to the point of comfortably and easily play
play this chord.

You can do the same thing with any of the open C A G E or D chords.

0---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|-3-|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|-2-|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|-1-|---|---|---|---|---|
0---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
This is an open A chord.

Move it up five frets...A->A#->B->C->C#->D
|---|---|---|---|-1-|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|-4-|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|-3-|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|-2-|---|
|---|---|---|---|-1-|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|

Alternatively....
|---|---|---|---|-1-|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|-2-|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|-2-|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|-2-|---|
|---|---|---|---|-1-|---|---|---|
|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|

These are both D chords.

You can do this with any of the chord shapes. 
Since there are five chord shapes this means you have five chord shapes going up the fretboard.


Of course you don't have to play the full chord shape. You can play part of the chord shape.

There are other ways to achieve what you're asking, but if you start with the CAGED system and put in the time to learn the relationships and positioning of these five chord shapes up and down the neck then you will be well on your way to opening up the fretboard and finding chords quickly all over the neck.

There are plenty of maps for the CAGED system if you google some images using that keyword. But I would urge you to take the time to practice these shapes daily over a few months to really get the knowledge ingrained so that you don't need a map.

Best of luck
Si
#8
Quote by Piercey27
...[ ]...I'm wanting to know if such a thing exists where it shows chords and where you can alternatively play them on the fret board. If that makes sense..
It makes a great deal of sense. But first, you have to fix in your mind whether you're talking about the same chord shape, the same chord "voicing", (Where notes are stacked in the same order, bottom to top), or merely chords of the same name.

Before you attack the "CAGED" system, make certain you understand the chromatic scale, in order to be able to name all the notes on any given string, from open to the 12th fret. (The neck simply repeats above the 12th fret.

Quote by Piercey27
For example instead of D chord on the regular spot, where you could play it elsewhere on the fret board and achieve the same chord.(Im wanting this type of diagram for as many chords as possible)...[ ]....
You can use a capo to help you sort out the difference between the exact same shape, (which would be a different named chord at a different fret), and the same name chord at different frets. The same "voicing" (again, note stack order), isn't always possible, nor practical.

In any event, the top nut of the guitar is nothing but a "grand barre" at the zero fret. A capo applies a "grand barre" as well, at whatever fret you select.

So, if you put a capo on the guitar at the second fret and play your D chord, you will be playing an E chord, with a D shape. Now, if you play a C major open chord with the capo on the 2nd fret, you will be playing your D chord. (Note that it won't be the same "shape", or the same "voicing", but it will be the same named chord.

Here's where your imagination comes into play, along with your knowledge of the fret board. Place your capo on any fret, and play the open chords you /know. THEN, use your index finger alongside the capo as a barre, and try swapping your fingers to form the open chord, while holding the barre. You'll find you can't always extract the full open chord with your modified fingering, but also many times you can.

In the mean time you should be gleaning useful knowledge parallel to the CAGED system about what "shape" becomes what root value chord name at any given fret.

Eg. A major open will become C major at the 3rd fret using either your finger as a barre, or a capo. In this sense your index finger becomes a moveable top nut in function.

Here we're moving the A major "open" chord (barre being the top nut or zero fret), up a minor 3rd to place the barre on the 3rd fret.

I hope this makes sense
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 20, 2016,