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#1
*|CMaj7 |CMaj7/E |CMaj7/G |CMaj7/B |
F|------|--------|--------|--------|
C|-4----|-7------|--------|--------|
G|-4----|-5------|-4------|-5------|
D|-5----|-9------|-2------|-5------|
A|-3----|-7------|-3------|-7------|
E|------|--------|-3------|-7------|

*|C7 |C7/E |C7/G |C7/Bb |
F|---|-----|-----|------|
C|-4-|-7---|-----|------|
G|-3-|-5---|-3---|-5----|
D|-5-|-8---|-2---|-5----|
A|-3-|-7---|-3---|-7----|
E|---|-----|-3---|-6----|

*|Cm7   |Cm7/Eb |Cm7/G |Cm7/Bb |
F|------|-------|------|-------|
C|-3----|-7-----|------|-------|
G|-3----|-5-----|-3----|-5-----|
D|-5----|-8-----|-1----|-5-----|
A|-3----|-6-----|-3----|-6-----|
E|------|-------|-3----|-6-----|

*|Cm7b5 |Cm7b5/Eb |Cm7b5/Gb |Cm7b5/Bb |
F|------|---------|---------|---------|
C|-3----|-6-------|---------|---------|
G|-3----|-5-------|-3-------|-4-------|
D|-4----|-8-------|-1-------|-5-------|
A|-3----|-6-------|-3-------|-6-------|
E|------|---------|-2-------|-6-------|


Maj9  = 1  2  5  7 |  2  3  5  7 () | (m7  :   3)
9     = 1  2  5 m7 |  2  3  5 m7 () | (m7b5:   3)
m9    = 1  2  5 m7 |  2 m3  5 m7 () | (Maj7:  m3)
mb9   = 1 m2  5 m7 | m2 m3  5 m7 () | (7   :  m3)
mb9b5 = 1 m2 b5 m7 | m2 m3 b5 m7 () | (m7  :  m3)

Maj11  = 1  3  4  7 | 1  4  5  7 (Maj#11:   4; 2) | (11    :  5; 1)
Maj#11 = 1  3 #4  7 | 1 #4  5  7 (m11b5 :  #4; 2) | (Maj11 :  5; 1)
11     = 1  3  4 m7 | 1  4  5 m7 (Maj11 :   4; 2) | (m11   :  5; 1)
m11    = 1 m3  4 m7 | 1  4  5 m7 (m11   :   4; 2) | (m11   :  5; 1)
m11b5  = 1 m3  4 m7 | 1  4 b5 m7 (m11   :   4; 2) | (Maj#11:  5; 1)

Maj13  = 1  3  5  6 | 1  3  6  7 (m7  :   6) | ()
13     = 1  3  5  6 | 1  3  6 m7 (m7  :   6) | ()
m13    = 1 m3  5  6 | 1 m3  6 m7 (m7b5:   6) | ()
mb13   = 1 m3  5 m6 | 1 m3 m6 m7 (Maj7:  m6) | ()
mb13b5 = 1 m3 b5 m6 | 1 m3 m6 m7 (7   :  m6) | () 


On the top you have all 4 types of 7th chords. On the bottom you have the formulas for the extensions.

Key for the formulas for the extensions:
Name of chord = substitute the higher scale degree | substitute the lower scale degree (name of chord : interval you build it upon in relation to the root note)

The section on the left is pretty straight forward. The section on the right is a cheat sheet for chords that already exist. For example, the notes to a Maj9 chord are the same as the notes to a m7 chord stacked upon the 3rd, but only when you substitute the higher scale degree [(higher formula) | (lower formula)], in other words D E G B [CMaj9 substituting the lower scale degree (2 3 5 7)] is the same as E G B D (Em7).

By higher and lower scale degree I mean, a CMaj7 is C E G B. If you want to build a CMaj9, you can substitute the higher scale degree, the 3, and make it C D G B, or you can substitute the lower scale degree, the 1, and make it D E G B.

This entire system works best when you tune to E A D G C F. You can apply all of this to the guitar in any tuning, but it might not be as symmetrical in other tunings, such as standard or drop d. I wish you good luck with your music and bye for now (:


EDIT:
Let me give you an example of how this works.
What chord do you want to play? FMaj7 #11/B

You start by building the FMaj7 chord. Now look at the extension chart and pick a formula. You can either substitute the 3 for the 4 or the 5 for the 4. You will end up with either a 1-4-5-7 or a 1-3-4-7 chord.

Lets say you want the first, the 1-4-5-7 chord. Which means you are substituting the 3 out for the 4.

You want to invert it so the B is the root note, FMaj7 #11/B right?

To do that, you must first invert the Maj7 chord so that the 3 is the root (because you are going to substitute it out for the 4)

Which means you are going to use the first inversion. FMaj7/A, then substitute the A out for the B and you get your FMaj7 #11/B chord:
*|FMaj7#11/B |
G|-5---------|
D|-3---------|
A|-7---------|
E|-7---------|


Now lets say you wanted the B on top, not the root note.

You have to pick the Maj7 inversion shape that has the 3 on top. Which is actually the root shape, the first Maj7 shape. Then all you have to do is substitute the 3 out for the 4, the A out for the B, and you get this:
*|FMaj7#11 |
G|-4-------|
D|-2-------|
A|-3-------|
E|-1-------|


That's pretty easy, isnt it?
Last edited by jrcsgtpeppers at Mar 17, 2016,
#2
You're not going to convince anyone to adopt your stupid 4ths tuning.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#3
That isnt my goal. I just like teaching (: I will have students one day. However, you dont have to tune to 4ths to understand the system of chord formulas I explained. It just makes it convenient IMO.
#4
You basically just did drop 2 chords on 1 string grouping. That's like 1% of the chords.
#5
You didn't even include major, minor, diminished, diminished 7th, major7b3, any kind of sus chords, augmented, etc nor any voicings of more than 4 notes, anything with open notes, etc. This is really only useful to a handful of jazz guitarists and even then is still missing a ton of information. Also the fact that the shapes you are giving are in a tuning that nobody here uses, most of those shapes are useless as is.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#6
You should check out Guitar George, he knows all the chords.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#7
Or an online chord. They know all the chords... in standard tuning.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#8
Quote by theogonia777
You didn't even include major, minor, diminished, diminished 7th, major7b3, any kind of sus chords, augmented, etc nor any voicings of more than 4 notes, anything with open notes, etc. This is really only useful to a handful of jazz guitarists and even then is still missing a ton of information. Also the fact that the shapes you are giving are in a tuning that nobody here uses, most of those shapes are useless as is.

You are correct. I did not include any triads. I also did not include the 1-b3-b5-bb7 chord, the 1-b3-5-7 chord, nor did I include any 1-3-#5-7 chords. I did however include all of the possible sustained chords in the extensions section. I didnt call the sustain chords I just simply called them extension substitutions.

I did include 4 chord voicings/inversions per chord, with the option of having the 1, 3, 5 or 7 on top or bottom. I did not include any open note chords because I dont see a purpose in them. If you want to include an open string in your chord just let go of a string (:

I wanted to simplify all of the chords into 4 note voicings. That was my main goal. The simpler the better. It is useful to more than a handful of jazz guitarists. I am sorry you cannot find any use in this information.

The shapes all work in standard tuning. Just play the chords on the E A D & G strings (: the shapes wont work over the other strings, which is a shame. It isnt missing any information that I am aware of. I think it is a complete and efficient system. Maybe ask a question if you dont understand something, I will be more than happy to explain.
#9
Quote by steven seagull
You should check out Guitar George, he knows all the chords.



Mind he's strictly rhythm.
“High fly ball into right field. She is… gone!" - Vin Scully
#10
Standard?? 440??? Oh no! This is treason! I will not have anything to do with you and your standards and your 440's, we only tune in 4ths @ H = squareroot of 2! You must be exiled to a deserted island! Guitar George seems to have become a dire problem and I must straighten him out.
#11
Quote by Standard_A440
Mind he's strictly rhythm.

He doesn't want to make it cry or sing.

To play any chord...learn the CAGED system for finding major chords across the neck. Learn which notes in each of those chords is the root third and fifth. Extend that knowledge to include the second and sixth to build the major pentatonic scale around each of the five major chord shapes. Extend that further to include the fourth and seventh to build the full diatonic major scale around each of the five chord shapes.

Learn chord construction.

Apply your knowledge in these two areas and practice changing between chord shapes by making some progressions that use them in order to turn that knowledge into muscle memory and to get the sounds of those chords into your ear.

It takes time, dedication, and focused practice but pretty soon you'll be confidently playing any new chord wherever you are on the neck without hesitation.
Si
#13
4ths tuning is stupid and you missed at least 1000 chords.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#14
Quote by theogonia777
You didn't even include major, minor, diminished, diminished 7th, major7b3, any kind of sus chords, augmented, etc nor any voicings of more than 4 notes, anything with open notes, etc. This is really only useful to a handful of jazz guitarists and even then is still missing a ton of information. Also the fact that the shapes you are giving are in a tuning that nobody here uses, most of those shapes are useless as is.
All of these voicings will be playable once he figures out how to build an instrument which is capable of being tuned only to the harmonic series, which of course, was the subject of another one of the TS' recent threads. Which I might add, none of you could "win" either.

I know all 6 chords on the guitar, and I can amuse myself nicely with them.

Now, here's my suggestion as to how to approach this, and future threads by this particular author. Before you step into anything, remember that it might be possible for enough bullshit and drool to form a type of quicksand. And once you step into it, there's no turning back....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 18, 2016,
#15
I've been trying to NOT immediately close every thread I deem stupid, but i can make an exception.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#16
Quote by theogonia777
You're not going to convince anyone to adopt your stupid 4ths tuning.
The OP won't, but Stanley Jordan might....
#17
Tbf, Jordan plays it like a Chapman stick/tapped bass.
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#18
Quote by jongtr
The OP won't, but Stanley Jordan might....


And 99% of the other guitar greats will convince them to stay in standard. =P
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#19
Quote by theogonia777
guitar greats

oxymoron

4ths tuning master race
modes are a social construct
#20
Quote by Hail
oxymoron

4ths tuning master race


is bass even an instrument like nobody cares about that shit

besides

all 3rds and all 5ths are the only worthwhile all regular tunings
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#21
Well here's a first.

Kristen's right.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#22
What are you talking about nerd. I'm always right.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#23
Well those 7th chord inversions are a great way to start learning about 7ths and extended harmonies.

The next level is learning the extended chords where you leave out the roots and 5ths. Those are the ones you'll get good use out of in jazz and larger ensembles, when there's no room for extra harmonic weight. And of course split voicings that give you the space to pick a bass line along with the chords/melody.
Last edited by cdgraves at Mar 19, 2016,
#24
Quote by theogonia777
And 99% of the other guitar greats will convince them to stay in standard. =P

Agreed.

I was only pointing out that it's not some bizarre invention of the OP.
I'd never choose it myself, but 1% of guitarists is quite a lot (although it's probably not as many as 1% ), and it does have some things to recommend it (apparently), among its obvious disadvantages.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_fourths_tuning
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 20, 2016,
#25
Quote by NeoMvsEu
Tbf, Jordan plays it like a Chapman stick/tapped bass.
Yes, but he plays it. The tuning may be stupid - for various reasons - but he isn't.
All kinds of alternative tunings work fine in specific contexts.

I'm sure it doesn't have to be played in tapped fashion, although obviously a tuning like that suits a particular way of playing. Chords in particular are a problem (as the OP seems to be inadvertently demonstrating) - no more barres for a start....
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 20, 2016,
#26
Quote by jongtr
Yes, but he plays it. The tuning may be stupid - for various reasons - but he isn't.
All kinds of alternative tunings work fine in specific contexts.

I'm sure it doesn't have to be played in tapped fashion, although obviously a tuning like that suits a particular way of playing. Chords in particular are a problem (as the OP seems to be inadvertently demonstrating) - no more barres for a start....



That's a really big deal for me. Barres are extremely powerful, I find.
#27
The point I was trying to make pithily was that the tuning of the guitar suits melodic or polyphonic playing better in that setup. Piccolo bass players often do the same thing.

Of course, chords are still possible, but the dissonance of the tuning scheme prevents it from being the focus.
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
Last edited by NeoMvsEu at Mar 20, 2016,
#29
Quote by fingrpikingood
That's a really big deal for me. Barres are extremely powerful, I find.


i use barre chords all the time
modes are a social construct
#30
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Here's one for you ...

Try E A D G Bb Db from bass to treble.

Makes it possible to play chord clusters on treble three strings without breaking your fingers.


You mean you guys can't stretch 7 frets?
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#31
I'm telling you. 5ths or 3rds. FCGDAE or maybe GDAEBF# if low F is too low. Or else DF#A#DF#A#D. Actually, NST on a 7 with the low F would be great. Maybe lower the 5 to an E though to give you the low bass E. So ECGDAEG.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Mar 20, 2016,
#32
Quote by Jet Penguin
You mean you guys can't stretch 7 frets?


You're a bad man :-)

As it happens, I can ... and up to 10 frets higher up the neck. But not with any rapidity, nor without sticking the guitar alongside my head.

2
5
8
x
x
0 (bass)

if you don't like that...

10 <-- How do you do this one!! Nose or other hand not allowed.
8
5
9
7
5 (bass)
#33
I'm the wrong person to talk chord clusters with. My strings are B/C/C#, D, E/D#/F, F#, G#/G/A, B/C/C#, D#/D/C#, E/D#/F/F#, F/G/F#, and G#/A. I am a trio of Bbs short of two octaves of chromatic scale in open notes. Like I can voice chords you couldn't image. With microtones as well.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#34
Quote by jerrykramskoy

10 <-- How do you do this one!! Nose or other hand not allowed.
8
5
9
7
5 (bass)
Can I use my dick? Har har har....

Seriously HTF do you do that?
#35
Quote by theogonia777
. With microtones as well.
Oh, the micro-tones are easy. Just lock the body in place with the upper part of your fretting arm, and yank back on the neck with the other....
#36
Quote by Captaincranky
Just lock the body in place with the upper part of your fretting arm, and yank back on the neck with the other....
And follow up with a knee to the groin. Usually does the trick.
That guy won't criticise my use of melodic minor modes next time...
Last edited by jongtr at Mar 21, 2016,
#38
Jet and Jerry, rocking the big stretch master race!
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#39
also hahahaha you nerds can't fretless hahahahahahahhaahha
modes are a social construct
#40
Stretches? Who needs that? I have more voicings at one position than you can play with half of your inetrument. Not only that, but completely fretless with an upper range extending beyond a piano.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
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