#1
I'm an "advanced beginner" guitarist and have about 30 minutes early each morning that I can devote to practice before I get my day started. How can I best make use of this time? So far I've been using the time to do chromatic scales and finger independence/strength exercises up and down the neck. Stuff like 1-2-3-4 from frets 1->12->1, then repeat doing 4-3-2-1, then 1-3-2-4, then triples and doubles as well. All with a metronome at a comfortable pace (currently half notes @ 80bpm)

Is this an efficient use of my practice time? I have more time later in the day to practice strumming, theory, songs, but I figure that the more practice time I can get in during the day, even if split up into small chunks of time, will be beneficial. Just want to make sure I'm doing the right stuff with the time I have
#2
Finger exercises are definitely a good start.
I would also recommend learning a few new chords every morning that you have never played.
My opinion thought is that learning challenging songs you love will be the best use of your time overall. So maybe take half of that 30 minutes to learn a cool guitar lick or intro from a song you like.

I agree that strength and flexibility are important, but you will kill two birds with one stone by learning a challenging cool lick or riff whilst giving your fingers a workout.

Keep up to metronome practice!
#3
These sorts of exercises are fine, but only if you are executing them with good technique. A common mistake, for example, when doing scales or chromatic exercises is to lift the fingers way above the fretboard between notes. When you aren't playing a note the finger only needs to be a few mm above the string, and if the next note is on the same string higher up then you don't need to even lift it off the string (just release the pressure).

If you're already doing that, then great! I found it really helped my finger independence.

The best way to get better though, imo, is to simply learn more songs. Every song usually has a fingering or two that is new and needs to be learned. Sometimes I'll even take something I can play and change the fingering to make it harder for myself (but easier in the long run as I try and go for the most efficient fingering).
#4
Thanks guys. Playing difficult songs (for me) and learning new songs is definitely part of my afternoon practice routine, along with strumming exercises and chord switching. I have more time to practice in the afternoons so I can fit all that in during those sessions. Sounds like I'm on a good track for my morning practices. Just wanted to make sure I was making good use of the short amount of time I have in the mornings. Cheers!
#5
Quote by gweddle.nz
A common mistake, for example, when doing scales or chromatic exercises is to lift the fingers way above the fretboard between notes. When you aren't playing a note the finger only needs to be a few mm above the string, and if the next note is on the same string higher up then you don't need to even lift it off the string (just release the pressure).


On this: when I'm doing my chromatic exercises I'm focusing on moving my fingers as little as possible, and especially focusing on keeping my index finger muting the higher strings on the fretboard while my palm mutes the lower strings to keep noise down. This is still difficult for me to do consistently, especially when picking down from the pinky (4-3-2-1) but I'm working on it!

It's also tough for me to keep the higher strings muted with my index finger when doing the 2-3 and 3-4 sets of this exercise which I think is very useful for me:

e --------------------------2-3-----------------------------------------------3-4-------------------
B ---------------------2-3------2-3-------------------------------------3-4------3-4--------------
G ----------------2-3----------------2-3---------------------------3-4---------------3-4----------
D -----------2-3--------------------------2-3-----------------3-4------------------------3-4------
A ------2-3------------------------------------2-3--------3-4---------------------------------3-4
E -2-3----------------------------------------------2-3-4------------------------------------------3-4
#6
Another good thing even I still do is pull out a practice book and work on my timing while working on my music reading. Kill 2 birds with one stone sort of method.
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#7
Quote by cheezhead
On this: when I'm doing my chromatic exercises I'm focusing on moving my fingers as little as possible, and especially focusing on keeping my index finger muting the higher strings on the fretboard while my palm mutes the lower strings to keep noise down. This is still difficult for me to do consistently, especially when picking down from the pinky (4-3-2-1) but I'm working on it!

It's also tough for me to keep the higher strings muted with my index finger when doing the 2-3 and 3-4 sets of this exercise which I think is very useful for me:


Whatever works for you. As with anything you're learning; slow and correct repetition = good results.
#8
I think you will be FAR better by practicing typical 3 notes per string shapes instead of that 1-2-3-4 chromatic thing simply because then you are basically practicing something that's being used in actual solos all the time.

There are 3 main bread and butter fretting combination which are, starting on 3rd fret on any string for example, 3-4-6 (1-2-4 fingers), 3-5-6 (1-3-4 fingers, even if play it 1-2-3 on all neck positions), and 3-5-7 (usually 1-2-4, less commonly 1-3-4) By learning to play these 3 shapes up and down, reversed, and so on, you will have the core of most soloing licks sealed in your muscle memory, which helps incredibly when you try to learn something new. When you get these, you can play pretty much any scale you want.

Add some 2 notes per string practice now and then and very little will be able to surprise you in songs.

Later on you can go into some arpeggio, sweep picking stuff, which is not so scary as it looks. IMO, picking every note in 2 notes per string scales is far harder than sweep picking arpeggios, but thats me.

I recommend you site http://www.scalerator.com/ - you can find all scales in here in all keys.
Happy practicing!
#9
I think you should take some lessons from really really professionally developed in sport guitarists. Yeah, I said, Sport. It's like Anton Oparin. I took guitar lessons from him about a year ago. He can help you to build a system of practice with your time as good as human being can only make. I'm economist and don't have lots of time. About an hour per day. But his power workout and stamina exercises, and details about playing are so accurate, that I can say it's what you need with your time. He just gave me about 5-6 lessons. That was enough. I'm doing great now. I developed 60% faster alternate picking, it enables to play almost everything what I wanted before him. In just 4 months...
#10
Quote by Mikavac
I think you will be FAR better by practicing typical 3 notes per string shapes instead of that 1-2-3-4 chromatic thing simply because then you are basically practicing something that's being used in actual solos all the time.

There are 3 main bread and butter fretting combination which are, starting on 3rd fret on any string for example, 3-4-6 (1-2-4 fingers), 3-5-6 (1-3-4 fingers, even if play it 1-2-3 on all neck positions), and 3-5-7 (usually 1-2-4, less commonly 1-3-4) By learning to play these 3 shapes up and down, reversed, and so on, you will have the core of most soloing licks sealed in your muscle memory, which helps incredibly when you try to learn something new. When you get these, you can play pretty much any scale you want.

Add some 2 notes per string practice now and then and very little will be able to surprise you in songs.

Later on you can go into some arpeggio, sweep picking stuff, which is not so scary as it looks. IMO, picking every note in 2 notes per string scales is far harder than sweep picking arpeggios, but thats me.

I recommend you site http://www.scalerator.com/ - you can find all scales in here in all keys.
Happy practicing!


Thanks for the advice! I do practice 1-2-4 and 1-3-4 but I will start to include 1-3-7 (and the reverse of these eg. 4-2-1 etc.)

BTW - that scalerator site is awesome! Great source for quickly identifying scales
#11
Definitely sounds like a good time to practice your technique! Just don't forget to devote time to play other people's music and write your own at some point in the day too
#12
Please don't promote your own site on the forums. If you have any video content you wish to share please actually post it in your reply, or if you have a new video you wish to share with the community but not as a response to a question then we have a new sticky thread for that purpose.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1700432
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#13
Sorry, it appears that if there is any chance I might benefit in the form of you checking out my invention from giving you advice it is removed. Good luck out there.