#1
Seems to be on the low E. Doesn't happen with any other string and on the low E, it's the first few frets it does it on. Tried raising the action of the bass side which helped a bit, but still hasn't fixed it. Doesn't come through the amp, but I can still hear it because the guitar is right next to me obviously when I'm playing it. What needs to be done?
Ibanez Art100 (DiMarzio Evo in bridge)
Epiphone Goldtop (SD Black Winters
6505+ Head
Avatar 2x12 (Eminence Gov/Swamp Thang)
#2
If it doesn't come through amplified I wouldn't worry about it.
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Pearl & Ebony • Les Paul PlusTop Pro Honeyburst • AJ220VS • Squier Standard Stratocaster CAR
Marshall Class 5 Combo • Digitech HT-2 • Vox V847 • MXR M68 Uni-Vibe • Soul Food • BOSS SD-1 • Digitech RV-7
#3
Quote by Stillhouse
If it doesn't come through amplified I wouldn't worry about it.



It doesn't but it's still annoying to hear because it's distracting me from listening to the amp.
Ibanez Art100 (DiMarzio Evo in bridge)
Epiphone Goldtop (SD Black Winters
6505+ Head
Avatar 2x12 (Eminence Gov/Swamp Thang)
#5
Hard to say without actually seeing or hearing it in person, as fret buzz is quite standard to some degree on electrics, as Stillhouse mentioned not a problem if its not coming through the amp.
But if you're worried then take it to your local guitar store, they'll give you the best diagnosis.
I've been in a similar situation and was told it was normal and not to worry.
#6
If you can hear string buzz on your low E, your amp isn't loud enough!

Seriously though, you could chase this forever and end up with too much bow in your neck and/or an E string that's too high with intonation problems.
#8
One thing that you need to understand is that when you change one thing on a guitar, such as going to lighter strings, is that everything else changes. Going from a set of 10-46 down to 9-42 strings for example, will lessen the tension on the neck as there is less pressure exerted. This will cause the neck to move back, decreasing the neck relief. Lowering the action ( hence buzz) and screwing up the intonation. My best advise is to take it to a tech and have it set up with the the gauge and brand of string you want to use and then stick with that brand and gauge. If you you were to change brand of strings (even using the same gauge) this can happen. You can learn to do a set up yourself with a few tools, but without a strobe tuner, you will never get the intonation right. And, as strobes are expensive, you may be better off to have a tech do this once or twice a year as needed.
Old guitar players never die...they just lose the tension in their G strings.
#9
What strings were you using and what strings now?
What tuning?
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
Last edited by bjgrifter at Apr 2, 2016,