Page 1 of 2
#1
So I've been looking at purchasing amps and I've decided that a small practice amp that's say, 5-10 watts isn't enough because they generally don't produce the powerful sounds I'm looking for, and I'm planning on jamming and gigging in the future, so I've been looking at peavey heads and marshall cabs to make a half-stack. My only worry is that they'll be too loud and I'll have to sell them after a couple days.

I've read about how I could set the master volume to low, and many other ways I could make it usable for bedroom usage, but the main idea I've had is to create a closet "amp chamber" with heavy fabric, padded foam, and a mic so I can listen to it in headphones through my computer. The goal of this would be to be able to play with the amp at full volume without getting kicked out of my house. Is this idea feasible?

Thanks!
#3
Besides what T00DEEPBLUE said above...

I've read about how I could set the master volume to low, and many other ways I could make it usable for bedroom usage, but the main idea I've had is to create a closet "amp chamber" with heavy fabric, padded foam, and a mic so I can listen to it in headphones through my computer


This is a waste of a good amp, IMHO. If you're almost always going to listen to it via headphones, you're better off spending your money on some kind of amp modeling device, either something portable like a Line 6 POD, Korg Pandora, or Boss BR, to one of those nifty rack mounted jobbies.

And if/hen you do start jamming or gigging, I bet you'll find that 20-60w amps are more than capable of doing the job. Firstly, because they're usually loud enough as is. Secondly, because most venues will be micing your amp and/or channeling it through their own system anyway. IOW, you won't have to have an amp capable of generating an F2 tornado.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#4
Quote by dannyalcatraz

This is a waste of a good amp, IMHO. If you're almost always going to listen to it via headphones, you're better off spending your money on some kind of amp modeling device, either something portable like a Line 6 POD, Korg Pandora, or Boss BR, to one of those nifty rack mounted jobbies.


Yeah, your points are very valid, but the reason I'd like an actual amp with a chamber to modelling software is because I like the idea of having an actual amp as opposed to a device I'm listening to in headphones. It's true that it can be more expensive as well, but I just like a proper amp more than software. I'm looking less for sound flexibility and more for something I can twist the knobs of and mess with and actually feel.
#5
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.


* well, TBH, only one so far. But I plan on wasting more money on amps in the future.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#6
Quote by adexder
something I can twist the knobs of and mess with and actually feel.



Still talking about amps?


You can get smaller amps that might fit your situation better. I keep my 40W combo amp quiet enough to keep the neighbours happy whilst maintaining a decent tone but can still turn it up loud enough for when I'm performing. It can easily do a small venue without a microphone.
#7
Quote by adexder
So I've been looking at purchasing amps and I've decided that a small practice amp that's say, 5-10 watts isn't enough because they generally don't produce the powerful sounds I'm looking for, and I'm planning on jamming and gigging in the future, so I've been looking at peavey heads and marshall cabs to make a half-stack. My only worry is that they'll be too loud and I'll have to sell them after a couple days.

I've read about how I could set the master volume to low, and many other ways I could make it usable for bedroom usage, but the main idea I've had is to create a closet "amp chamber" with heavy fabric, padded foam, and a mic so I can listen to it in headphones through my computer. The goal of this would be to be able to play with the amp at full volume without getting kicked out of my house. Is this idea feasible?

Thanks!


1) Let me save you a lot of hassle - there is no way you will be running any amp, even a 5 watt tube amp, at full volume in your bedroom without it being ferociously loud AND sounding atrocious.

2) the best solution for bedroom practice is a small digital amp, like a YamahaTHR or Roland Micro Cube because they sound half decent at very low volumes. Most tube amps sound terrible at very low levels, because of the way they constructed. On a related note, digital amps sound terrible loud and tube amps sound amazing loud.

3) If you plan on using headphones, just use Bias amp sim with a good reverb plugin - it will sound better than a poorly miced amp in a closet and for practicing it is really ideal because you can really control what you are hearing, especially when playing along with a tune or some tracks.
#8
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE


^^Yep.

I get a kickass TV-level tone out of my 6505+ (60 watts, running a 4 X 12 cab with obnoxiously-efficient Eminence speakers). It wouldn't make any difference if it were the 120 watt version either. Just use an overdrive to boost it and it will sound good at quiet volumes, and make sure you're right in front of the speakers. That's about it. Even turned to barely audible, my real 6505 still beat the pants off my Vypyr 30 modeler, set to the 6505 mode. It is a myth that modelers sound better at lower volumes.

If your neighbors are so fussy they can't handle even TV volumes, then I would suggest a modeler with a good set of headphones.

Buy the amp you want for the tone you want. It is not 1970 anymore -- amps have volume knobs that work while still getting the tone you want.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#9
Just ask yourself this, how many people use "a closet "amp chamber" with heavy fabric, padded foam, and a mic so I can listen to it in headphones through my computer."

Why do you think that is?
#10
Quote by reverb66
Most tube amps sound terrible at very low levels, because of the way they constructed. On a related note, digital amps sound terrible loud and tube amps sound amazing loud.


This is absolute and utter horseshit.

Read the article linked above, then come back and let's discuss this...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#11
Tube amps really don't sound that great quiet, there's not enough crunch. I'm not saying they're terrible but there's a certain point where you get that tone you want through pushing the volume.

As for the amp situation, I use a 120 watt half stack in my bedroom and luckily I can turn it up pretty fucking loud. Here's what I have to say: Once you actually find people to play with, get one. I needed one because I was in a band and my little amp wasn't doing it. Plus, do you know how much of a bitch it is trying to move a half stack? You need something like a Peavey Vypyr 30 or something
Baby Joel's rabbit profile picture is kinda cute. #TeamJOEL
#12
Quote by PiercedBand
Tube amps really don't sound that great quiet, there's not enough crunch. I'm not saying they're terrible but there's a certain point where you get that tone you want through pushing the volume.


Once again, as a general statement that's simply not true, although it's an all too common and pervasive myth.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Mar 22, 2016,
#13
Quote by adexder
So I've been looking at purchasing amps and I've decided that a small practice amp that's say, 5-10 watts isn't enough because they generally don't produce the powerful sounds I'm looking for, and I'm planning on jamming and gigging in the future, so I've been looking at peavey heads and marshall cabs to make a half-stack. My only worry is that they'll be too loud and I'll have to sell them after a couple days.

I've read about how I could set the master volume to low, and many other ways I could make it usable for bedroom usage, but the main idea I've had is to create a closet "amp chamber" with heavy fabric, padded foam, and a mic so I can listen to it in headphones through my computer. The goal of this would be to be able to play with the amp at full volume without getting kicked out of my house. Is this idea feasible?

Thanks!

Spend $100 for a used Pod and get monstrously huge guitar tone in your headphones that sounds like a wall of Marshalls at Glastonbury. Done.

These days 120w tube amps are effectively obsolete. Even touring world stages every venue has a huge sound system to provide all the dynamic headroom you could ever need or want. Around 30-50 watts will always get it done in a tube amp in this century.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#14
Quote by Arby911
This is absolute and utter horseshit.

Read the article linked above, then come back and let's discuss this...


Those are some pretty solid arguments - hard to argue against that. If only I hadn't been using every iteration of guitar amp and technology over the last 20 + years and know exactly what I'm talking about from actual experience...

I'll clarify since you clearly need an education :

As a general rule, tube amps sound better at loud volumes - they each have a "sweetspot". Even modern tube amps with master volumes, like my Mesa Boogie Lonestar Special, do not perform anywhere near their tone potential at bedroom volumes. If your trying to practice without bothering someone in the next room, it's not going to happen with that amp, and it's a 30 watt 1x12.

Digital amps typically sound terrible at jamming or gigging volumes, which is why tube amps still even exist despite how costly and difficult they are to maintain. At bedroom levels, digital amps perform very well. I can practice with my Roland Micro Cube and it will sound decent and barely register in the next room, because it pushes zero bass ( I'll let you research why this is relevant) and you don't need to reach a sweetspot, like with a tube amp. Does that mean the Micro Cube is anywhere near as great as the Mesa??? No, it isn't, but when you need to play at very low volumes it doesn't matter, because you aren't getting anything special from a tube amp at those levels.

For practicing in a bedroom quietly, a tube amp is a bad choice. Micing a tube amp in a closet is actually an even more terrible choice because it will sound terrible regardless and still be insanely loud.

So... which part of what I'm saying here is wrong?
Last edited by reverb66 at Mar 22, 2016,
#15
Quote by reverb66
Those are some pretty solid arguments - hard to argue against that. If only I hadn't been using every iteration of guitar amp and technology over the last 20 + years and know exactly what I'm talking about from actual experience...

I'll clarify since you clearly need an education :

As a general rule, tube amps sound better at loud volumes - they each have a "sweetspot". Even modern tube amps with master volumes, like my Mesa Boogie Lonestar Special, do not perform anywhere near their tone potential at bedroom volumes. If your trying to practice without bothering someone in the next room, it's not going to happen with that amp, and it's a 30 watt 1x12.

Digital amps typically sound terrible at jamming or gigging volumes, which is why tube amps still even exist despite how costly and difficult they are to maintain. At bedroom levels, digital amps perform very well. I can practice with my Roland Micro Cube and it will sound decent and barely register in the next room, because it pushes zero bass ( I'll let you research why this is relevant) and you don't need to reach a sweetspot, like with a tube amp. Does that mean the Micro Cube is anywhere near as great as the Mesa??? No, it isn't, but when you need to play at very low volumes it doesn't matter, because you aren't getting anything special from a tube amp at those levels.

For practicing in a bedroom quietly, a tube amp is a bad choice. Micing a tube amp in a closet is actually an even more terrible choice because it will sound terrible regardless and still be insanely loud.

So... which part of what I'm saying here is wrong?


Pretty much all of it. And you can quit playing the "I've been doing this a long time" game since I'll see your 20 and raise you another 20...

Read the article linked above and then we can discuss.

Suffice it to say that your anecdotal belief isn't salient. You appear to think that tube amps have some mystical property that overcomes the laws of physics. I'm here to tell you it ain't so.

And the belief that "digital" amps automagicaly sound bad at high volume is frankly amusing.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#16
Nothing wrong with having an iso speaker cab. Might want to look it up online, I think there's a $300 one from Jet City which should do for a start.
It is not a waste of amp as you can mic it and achieve much better results recording than you woukd witg a processor.
#17
Quote by Arby911
Pretty much all of it. And you can quit playing the "I've been doing this a long time" game since I'll see your 20 and raise you another 20...

Read the article linked above and then we can discuss.

Suffice it to say that your anecdotal belief isn't salient. You appear to think that tube amps have some mystical property that overcomes the laws of physics. I'm here to tell you it ain't so.

And the belief that "digital" amps automagicaly sound bad at high volume is frankly amusing.


Digital amps don't magically sound bad at high volumes, they just sound bad, in comparison with a tube amp - which is why nearly major act and every major player still uses tube amps to play live. Is it a conspiracy? Is the entire tube amp market a sham? Are all those guitarists and engineer's simply fooled? Or.... are you dead wrong.

The two exceptions to this rule are Fractal Axe FX and Kemper, neither of which are "digital amps", and neither of which are really used all that much live yet. I've heard two professional shows using the Axe FX - Megadeth and a Pink Floyd Tribute from Britain. Megadeth sounded great and the Pink Floyd Tribute was a disaster from a tone standpoint - the weakness of the technology really stands out for organic classic type tones, but for metal it was great.

We're discussing bedroom practice and when discussing " digital amps" we mean the actual digital amps, with a speaker etc., like a Roland Cube, Line 6 or a Peavey Vypr etc., not $2500 rackmount studio amp simulators.

I don't know what your level of experience is or how capable your ears are, but not acknowledging the basic things I'm saying here, which are common knowledge amongst guitarists and sound engineers all over the world, is a bit bizarre.

I'm trying to help the OP, because I have experience dealing with amps, sims, and digital amps and keeping noise down. If he wants to use a tube amp in his closet, he's better off with a small digital amp or sims using headphones, because volume is the key to getting good tone from a tube amp, but that doesn't apply to digital.
#18
The Megadeth record was all tracked via Axe Fx and sounds horrendous, that's tge worst production I've heard from them in a long time.
Then I know Jennifer Batten toured with Boss GT-10 supporting Jeff Beck and sounded great. So, its all a matter of what works for tge artist.
As a studio engineer on the whole I see a lot more digital modeling disasters and rarely a win, as opposed to tube amps which are usually great out of tge box with a SM57 or Sennheiser or whatever in front.
#19
Quote by diabolical
The Megadeth record was all tracked via Axe Fx and sounds horrendous, that's tge worst production I've heard from them in a long time.
Then I know Jennifer Batten toured with Boss GT-10 supporting Jeff Beck and sounded great. So, its all a matter of what works for tge artist.
As a studio engineer on the whole I see a lot more digital modeling disasters and rarely a win, as opposed to tube amps which are usually great out of tge box with a SM57 or Sennheiser or whatever in front.


I wasn't referring to a recording, I was referring to a concert ( they played Rust in Peace in its entirety)- they ran the Axe units through power amps and miced speakers - in that context it worked very well.
#20
Quote by reverb66
Digital amps don't magically sound bad at high volumes, they just sound bad, in comparison with a tube amp - which is why nearly major act and every major player still uses tube amps to play live. Is it a conspiracy? Is the entire tube amp market a sham? Are all those guitarists and engineer's simply fooled? Or.... are you dead wrong.

The two exceptions to this rule are Fractal Axe FX and Kemper, neither of which are "digital amps", and neither of which are really used all that much live yet. I've heard two professional shows using the Axe FX - Megadeth and a Pink Floyd Tribute from Britain. Megadeth sounded great and the Pink Floyd Tribute was a disaster from a tone standpoint - the weakness of the technology really stands out for organic classic type tones, but for metal it was great.

We're discussing bedroom practice and when discussing " digital amps" we mean the actual digital amps, with a speaker etc., like a Roland Cube, Line 6 or a Peavey Vypr etc., not $2500 rackmount studio amp simulators.

I don't know what your level of experience is or how capable your ears are, but not acknowledging the basic things I'm saying here, which are common knowledge amongst guitarists and sound engineers all over the world, is a bit bizarre.

I'm trying to help the OP, because I have experience dealing with amps, sims, and digital amps and keeping noise down. If he wants to use a tube amp in his closet, he's better off with a small digital amp or sims using headphones, because volume is the key to getting good tone from a tube amp, but that doesn't apply to digital.


Have you even bothered to read the article?

I'm guessing no, you're very secure in your opinion, and insecure in examining anything that might contradict it.

In that case, have a nice day, your preferred misinformation won't change my life at all.

FWIW, I love tube amps, own several and have played probably 3x as many as I've owned. I just don't blindly accept the fantasies promulgated about them. Also, you keep using "digital" as if it had meaning? The amps you reference aren't "digital", as every one of them has an analog power amp section. What they do have are digital preamps. To the best of my knowledge, there's no guitar amp in production that's entirely digital?

Of course if it's all solid state amplification that you're railing against, that's even more amusing.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Mar 22, 2016,
#21
Quote by reverb66
Digital amps don't magically sound bad at high volumes, they just sound bad, in comparison with a tube amp - which is why nearly major act and every major player still uses tube amps to play live. Is it a conspiracy? Is the entire tube amp market a sham? Are all those guitarists and engineer's simply fooled? Or.... are you dead wrong. .


More and more major acts are turning away from tube amps to play live.

And a lot of those that have them on stage are using them as stage decoration or (in arena situations) just to get the feeling of playing "in a room" because the sound goes out and never bounces back.

Most of the tube amp market is declining (check with NAMM or several of the marketing trackers and no, get your own links). Modeling amps already hold the highest market share (and Line 6 had topped all others a couple of years ago with something like 38% of the market share) and it's increasing.

There are older acts that will use them until they die because that's what they've always used and they don't know any better.

It is what it is.

There are guys who grumble that there's no substitute for cubic inches in their cars, too, and that there's nothing like the rumble of a V8. Truth is, they're getting blown off the line by small V6's with twin turbos and, worst of all, they're getting smoked by family-size electric cars with AWD. Helluva thing.
#22
I'd have to say another myth is how costly are tube amps to maintain. I've had to have my solid state amps repaired in the longer run of gigging many more times that I've to with tube amps. Actually over my gigging days, when I went on constant gigs with solid state I've had more issues overall than tube. Funny enough, my spare backup tube amp showed a problem while under warranty and was fixed by Peavey, no questions asked.
Granted, I've seen some tube disasters while on stage and it has been interesting, especially seeing this nu-core kid fry a $4000 rectifier rig his rich lawyer dad bought him for his first live gig, and that was after we all told him that he needs to connect the speaker cab before turning it on
#23
Quote by adexder
So I've been looking at purchasing amps and I've decided that a small practice amp that's say, 5-10 watts isn't enough because they generally don't produce the powerful sounds I'm looking for, and I'm planning on jamming and gigging in the future


Here's another issue beyond the bedroom.

If you plan on jamming and gigging in the future, you should check and see what's allowed onstage these days. More and more often, clubs are enforcing their own rules about stage volume and requiring that you curb the 100 Marshalls with the 4x12s. They don't want the noise in the vocal mikes, they don't want their down-front customers whining about the ear-splitting treble beamed by a 4x12 and they definitely don't want the uneven sound mix that happens when they can't control things.
#24
Quote by dspellman
Here's another issue beyond the bedroom.

If you plan on jamming and gigging in the future, you should check and see what's allowed onstage these days. More and more often, clubs are enforcing their own rules about stage volume and requiring that you curb the 100 Marshalls with the 4x12s. They don't want the noise in the vocal mikes, they don't want their down-front customers whining about the ear-splitting treble beamed by a 4x12 and they definitely don't want the uneven sound mix that happens when they can't control things.


Valid point. We also had noise control cops around Houston for a while, apparently our mayor had a bug up her a** about noise pollution in her first term. Luckily she's out now and things are back to normal but I've had some friends' bands suffer from this and get tickets, even one guitarist ended up in jail after a short skirmish with the noise control squad.
#25
Quote by diabolical
I'd have to say another myth is how costly are tube amps to maintain. I've had to have my solid state amps repaired in the longer run of gigging many more times that I've to with tube amps. Actually over my gigging days, when I went on constant gigs with solid state I've had more issues overall than tube.


While that's a good anecdotal data point, tube amps in general need a retube every couple of years and I've learned to carry a box of spares on gigs. The least expensive retube kit for any of my current road amps is just under $100.

I have one rack of two tube preamps and one tube power amp (100W) that has nine 12AX7s in one preamp, five in another, an additional three in the power amp and four EL34s. A hard drop that might not affect a modeler at all could easily take out the entire tube complement. Worse, however, are the transformers. We had a roadie who dropped a Marshall head IN A ROAD CASE on its end off the back of a truck. Road case was fine. Head cabinet was fine. A quick inspection of the chassis showed that the chassis was bent with two of the transformers at nearly 30 degree angles. Done for the night.
#26
I was doing constant gigs, say 2 4 hour rehearsals a week plus at least a gig per week, sometimes two on a Peavey Classic 50/50 power amp, which is a knockoff of the Mesa power amps. It did 5 years without need to retube. Did 5 years after that on a Marshall JCM900, one retube only.
In comparison, my Peavey bass amp that I played in a pop rock band was twice in the shop for blown transistors in 3 years of gigging, my Marshall Valvestate VS8100 head took 3 repairs in 2 years (none tube related as it has a token tube for marketing purposes), and has one channel not working again.
Don't know what to say - bad luck in your case on the road. I gigged as a bassist in a band that used a hitch trailer for our equipment, the two guitarists had tube heads, both Peavey, one JSX and one 5150, those two amps took serious beating and there was only one bent know on the 5150 in the 3 years of constant gigging and disregard for the amp's well being, they were basically thrown about in the trailer and saw some really rough road conditions. To be fair, my solid state bass rig also didn't suffer in the process, but lets say that I would've treated my tube amps a lot nicer than these guys did and still they had no issues. There was one retube for the duration I was with that band, on the 5150 which had to be biased, I think he spent $160.
#27
Everyone's talking about tube amps. What about Solid state?
And I'm not just buying an amp to mic it in my closet. That would be terribly cost-inefficient. I was simply stating that was a method I could use to silence it if I wanted to record it at full volume. I'm no expert on amps, I'm only just getting into learning about all this and what's good and what's not. Thanks for all your guys' input
#28
About solid state - if we're talking high gain, there are a few amps and very few. One worked for Dime, another one worked for Dying Fetus and other death metal bands, they're both long since discontinued with bad designs by these companies taking their place.

There is one iconic jazz ss amp that people still buy, the Roland Jazz Chorus. There are some small clean ss amps that sneak in jazz once in a while but not enough to really make a big deal about it.

Only true solid state at this point is the Tech21 brand - TM30 and TM60, everything else is digital modeling with cheap power amp attached, as the French would say "garbache"

At home I record mostly through an Orange Tiny Terror combo on the 7 watt setting. It is mainly out of convenience - the amp is not fussy at all, takes all kinds of pedals if I want to change its tone (overdrives, distortion, no problem), tracks great and works on anything short of pristine clean. All my other amps will involve moving something around a miking them and I am too lazy for the most part knowing that I get good results with this. Every once in a while I mike the big 4x12 with a head thrown in the other room when I am reamping and need two distinct rhythm tones, one of these again is the Tiny Terror.
#29
Quote by reverb66
Digital amps don't magically sound bad at high volumes, they just sound bad, in comparison with a tube amp - which is why nearly major act and every major player still uses tube amps to play live. Is it a conspiracy? Is the entire tube amp market a sham? Are all those guitarists and engineer's simply fooled? Or.... are you dead wrong.

The two exceptions to this rule are Fractal Axe FX and Kemper, neither of which are "digital amps", and neither of which are really used all that much live yet. I've heard two professional shows using the Axe FX - Megadeth and a Pink Floyd Tribute from Britain. Megadeth sounded great and the Pink Floyd Tribute was a disaster from a tone standpoint - the weakness of the technology really stands out for organic classic type tones, but for metal it was great.

We're discussing bedroom practice and when discussing " digital amps" we mean the actual digital amps, with a speaker etc., like a Roland Cube, Line 6 or a Peavey Vypr etc., not $2500 rackmount studio amp simulators.

I don't know what your level of experience is or how capable your ears are, but not acknowledging the basic things I'm saying here, which are common knowledge amongst guitarists and sound engineers all over the world, is a bit bizarre.

I'm trying to help the OP, because I have experience dealing with amps, sims, and digital amps and keeping noise down. If he wants to use a tube amp in his closet, he's better off with a small digital amp or sims using headphones, because volume is the key to getting good tone from a tube amp, but that doesn't apply to digital.


You seem to be confused with respect to "digital" amps. All of the modelling amps (low to high end) convert analog audio to digital data and send it to a DSP where software manipulates the data. It is then converted back to analog audio and then amplified, either to a level capable of driving a speaker or a pre-amp/line level audio signal that needs an amplifier. Doesn't matter whether it's a high end modeler like Fractal AX8, FX II, Kemper, helix or a low end modeler like Fender, Vox or Peavey. The differences between them are quality of components, complexity of the models and level of tweaking.
As for saying they are not recognized your information is way out of date. Many studios use them as an alternative to having a ton of amps laying around. Many, many Artists these days also use them frequently as part of their rigs. Modeling has come leaps and bounds in the last several years.
Many people see, to either forget or are ignorant of the fact that the majority of music heard today has been digitized, either when recorded (Pro-tools for eg) or played back (CDs, DVDs) regardless of the amps used to generate the guitar's tone, unless you're playing something recorded purely in analog and playing it back on a cassette or LP it's been in a digital format some where along the trail.
Moving on.....
#30
Quote by diabolical
I was doing constant gigs, say 2 4 hour rehearsals a week plus at least a gig per week, sometimes two on a Peavey Classic 50/50 power amp, which is a knockoff of the Mesa power amps. It did 5 years without need to retube. Did 5 years after that on a Marshall JCM900, one retube only.
In comparison, my Peavey bass amp that I played in a pop rock band was twice in the shop for blown transistors in 3 years of gigging, my Marshall Valvestate VS8100 head took 3 repairs in 2 years (none tube related as it has a token tube for marketing purposes), and has one channel not working again.
Don't know what to say - bad luck in your case on the road. I gigged as a bassist in a band that used a hitch trailer for our equipment, the two guitarists had tube heads, both Peavey, one JSX and one 5150, those two amps took serious beating and there was only one bent know on the 5150 in the 3 years of constant gigging and disregard for the amp's well being, they were basically thrown about in the trailer and saw some really rough road conditions. To be fair, my solid state bass rig also didn't suffer in the process, but lets say that I would've treated my tube amps a lot nicer than these guys did and still they had no issues. There was one retube for the duration I was with that band, on the 5150 which had to be biased, I think he spent $160.


I think here you are understandably confusing component reliability with reliable circuit design. Solid state devices used in well designed circuits and operated safely within their ratings do not degrade at all over time. There is no "lifetime". The opportune words being "well designed". Many solid state amp designers simply cut corners in design to save $$$. Heat is the enemy of SS amps and cheaping out on heatsinks, or running the device near their maximum ratings can cause them to fail but then this is predicable.
Tubes on the other hand do degrade with time and often unpredictably. They may last years before degrading noticeably, though if a gradual process you likely won't notice until they have all but failed. Or they may fail quickly, not all tubes are made the same.
The death of tube testers has hampered our ability to monitor the status of tube amps considerably. Heck years ago most Radio Shacks (and even old style drug stores) had a tube tester you could use for free. Now the approach is replace it and see if it gets better.
Moving on.....
#31
Well if we are talking studio magic I've had to run a lot of these modelers through high end analog preamps that add a lot of live and change the tone for the better so you are rarely hearing say an Axe-Fx direct into a board, many times it goes through say an Avalon pre or something that makes it much better.
#32
Quote by KenG
I think here you are understandably confusing component reliability with reliable circuit design. Solid state devices used in well designed circuits and operated safely within their ratings do not degrade at all over time. There is no "lifetime".


I've never heard that claim before and I've been involved in electronics for a long time?

I'm not saying you're wrong, just that while I freely admit that my knowledge of the field is incomplete in many areas, that seems to be something I might have picked up in at least one of the myriad of courses I attended?

Of course it's possible I just missed it. Or forgot it...

Edit: A cursory Google search shows me publications that allude to the fact that Solid State devices are subject to degradation due to aging etc. ?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Mar 22, 2016,
#33
Lets also not forget the fact that solid state technology has changed a lot in the last few years. Now you have "class D" amplifiers that are for the most part also unserviceable, they break, you toss them in the garbage bin. The upside is that now you can have a unit the size of a Walkman push 1000 watts of power. They are OK for bass from what I've heard, still waiting for guitar amps to catch up with these designs, it would be at least interesting to see, I wouldn't mind doing a gig through an amp the size of my phone if it can pull off a decent tone.
#34
Quote by diabolical
Lets also not forget the fact that solid state technology has changed a lot in the last few years. Now you have "class D" amplifiers that are for the most part also unserviceable, they break, you toss them in the garbage bin. The upside is that now you can have a unit the size of a Walkman push 1000 watts of power. They are OK for bass from what I've heard, still waiting for guitar amps to catch up with these designs, it would be at least interesting to see, I wouldn't mind doing a gig through an amp the size of my phone if it can pull off a decent tone.


They're not really "unserviceable", they're often just cheap enough that it's generally not worth it.

IIRC, the 600w Kemper power amp is Class D, as was the now-discontinued but generally highly thought of Crate Powerblock, and I believe the ZT Lunchbox (200 Watts) is as well.

It's the future for Power ends I suspect.

Edit: Turns out the ZT Lunchbox isn't, although now I'm suspicious as to how they got 200w stuffed into that box.

Edit 2: Also several Quilter amps, The Demeter Mighty Minnie (Tube pre, Class D Power end) and the Electro-Harmonix 44 Magnum, a 44w power end in a pedal!
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
Last edited by Arby911 at Mar 22, 2016,
#35
I know there's a Polish company Taurus amps that has a 3 channel pedal with 200 watt power amp stuffed in it...but they're truly unserviceable, my amp tech worked for a company that does most major sound around the Houston area and I was literally at his bench with him explaining what can't be fixed on a lot of the new class D power amps. He was staff tech there so basically everything that could be repaired was repaired, but a lot of the new ones just couldn't be repaired...think of micro electrical schemes that are so small that a soldering gun can't get in there, like working on a tablet PC.
#36
Quote by diabolical
I know there's a Polish company Taurus amps that has a 3 channel pedal with 200 watt power amp stuffed in it...but they're truly unserviceable, my amp tech worked for a company that does most major sound around the Houston area and I was literally at his bench with him explaining what can't be fixed on a lot of the new class D power amps. He was staff tech there so basically everything that could be repaired was repaired, but a lot of the new ones just couldn't be repaired...think of micro electrical schemes that are so small that a soldering gun can't get in there, like working on a tablet PC.


Yeah, I suppose there's stuff that simply can't be repaired, and I've not seen the newest Class D stuff yet.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#38
Quote by diabolical
Nothing wrong with having an iso speaker cab. Might want to look it up online, I think there's a $300 one from Jet City which should do for a start.
It is not a waste of amp as you can mic it and achieve much better results recording than you woukd witg a processor.


Back to TS original topic, I built myself a little iso box a few years back to basically do exactly what you're looking for.

I love my tube amps, but it was hard to really get them going with my GF home, or late at night, and I hated the idea of getting something like a POD or the likes to play quietly through headphones. I don't know what is, but I'm just really not a fan of modellers, and you won't convince me other wise. So I basically built 2 wooden boxes, one being slightly smaller then the other, so it could fit in the bigger one with about an inch gap all around. I pumped some expanding foam in-between, and fitted a removable speaker in there, with enough room left for a couple mic's on small stands. I run it into my interface, and viola, near silent jamming. Its great for recording too, to keep background noises out.

I usually run 50watt heads, but I've used 100watt heads on it. Just be careful no to blow the speaker if you're planning on running 120watts into a single speaker.
Guitars:
PRS Custom 24
Gibson Les Paul 60's Tribute
85' MIJ Strat
97' Snakepit Les Paul
LP Traditional 1960 Zebra
MIJ Tele
MIA Strat

Amps:
Silver Jubilee 2525
Peavey Ultra 112
Jet City JCA50H
66' Bassman
Pink Paisley Princeton RV
74' Vibro Champ
#39
Quote by red.guitar
I hated the idea of getting something like a POD or the likes to play quietly through headphones. I don't know what is, but I'm just really not a fan of modellers, and you won't convince me other wise.


Yeah! A lot of people are recommending modellers to me for bedroom playing but I don't like the idea of listening through my headphones. I prefer using an "organic" sound such as an amp more.

On the topic of iso boxes, what you did sounds really good. I was thinking of building a plywood box and filling it with acoustic foam and thick padding to isolate sound, and I could just toss a cab in there when I'm not playing with other people, close it, set up a mic and get jamming!
#40
Google something like "isolation speaker plans" I bet there are lots of options. Even if you don't use their directions, it will get you started.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
Page 1 of 2