#1
I've noticed that with a lot of analog delay pedals the tap tempo offers a significantly longer delay time than the delay control (i.e. on the Way Huge Supa Puss you can get 900ms using the knob and 3 seconds with the tap tempo, as well as a note subdivision option) - any ideas why? Presumably when you're using bucket brigade devices or ICs there's a limit to how long the delay can be, so I'm kind of confused how the tap tempo would allow you more delay time than the knob. I have a hard time understanding how that works unless you have digital elements, but then I'm not great with electronics.

So basically, how do tap tempos work? Why do they give longer delay times than delay knobs? Are there any digital shenanigans involved?
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#2
Usually, taps are on digital devices, or digitally-controlled analog devices. Analog delays after 300-400 ms start to sound pretty muddy (this is why people like them), so most don't have tap tempo. Digital devices have have minutes of delay, so it syncs to a 'clock' that you set in place from your taps.
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#3
Quote by K33nbl4d3


So basically, how do tap tempos work? Why do they give longer delay times than delay knobs? Are there any digital shenanigans involved?


*Headscratch*

The tap tempos on my time-based devices have you hit something twice to match the tempo with whatever speed you're playing. That's the "tap." What are you referring to?
#4
Quote by dspellman
*Headscratch*

The tap tempos on my time-based devices have you hit something twice to match the tempo with whatever speed you're playing. That's the "tap." What are you referring to?

Said thing that you hit twice has electrical components under it

In an "analog delay" with a tap tempo switch, I am wondering whether use of said switch causes your signal to be converted at any point along the way to a digital one*, or whether any digital element to the circuit (which as far as I can tell a tap tempo involves more or less by definition) is only used to control something else in the circuit (a resistance?) in which case I wonder why the delay knob doesn't have such range.

*Yes, I do understand that it would subsequently be converted back.
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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Mar 22, 2016,
#5
A bucket brigade device uses a clock signal to determine the delay rate. I suspect that the tap tempo function is digital and produces the clock signal for the analog delay. The guitar signal is never converted to the digital domain.

As for how that extends delay time, I have no idea.

EDIT: I think the reasons might be more simple. Maybe the analog delay is capable of up to 3 seconds, but the time knob is deliberately limited to a fraction of the total range, to allow for more precise adjustment. Most people rarely use a 3-second long delay.
Last edited by sashki at Mar 22, 2016,
#6
As I understand the question, you're not actually asking how they work, but why a tap can extend the delay longer than the control set?

I don't have an answer, but from the responses above I don't think the question was clear.
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#7
Quote by sashki
A bucket brigade device uses a clock signal to determine the delay rate. I suspect that the tap tempo function is digital and produces the clock signal for the analog delay. The guitar signal is never converted to the digital domain.

As for how that extends delay time, I have no idea.

EDIT: I think the reasons might be more simple. Maybe the analog delay is capable of up to 3 seconds, but the time knob is deliberately limited to a fraction of the total range, to allow for more precise adjustment. Most people rarely use a 3-second long delay.

That makes sense, and I guess it also makes sense that if you're using a delay that long you probably want it in time with the music. Thanks

Quote by Arby911
As I understand the question, you're not actually asking how they work, but why a tap can extend the delay longer than the control set?

A bit of both; the latter question led me to wonder about the former. I think I've got pretty good answers to both, since sashki managed to see what I was getting at in spite of my poor expression.

Quote by Arby911
I don't have an answer, but from the responses above I don't think the question was clear.

You're right, I think that's basically because I don't understand the area very well so I guess I kind of defaulted to vague questions even though I was trying not to.

All that said, thanks, all
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#8
I'm curious about this too.

Digital clocks are considered a no-no in the boutique pedal world, even if the digital clock never even affects the tone circuit. But they're just so much easier to use than trial and error with just a pot.
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#9
My guess is that when you use tap tempo they clock the BBD lower than normal spec and filter the crap out of the signal. I bet the delayed signal sounds a lot more filtered when going beyond the 900msec.
#10
Tap Tempo pedals worketh in weird ways.

I think a DD-20 changes tempo at the speed of distance between the tap and the tap before it (if you do three taps, it will use the tempo of the speed between the 2nd and 3rd tap.

Still others want four taps and will average the four to set the tempo speed.
Others can be set via MIDI instruction...