#1
I have a pair of Sony wireless headphones. They use bluetooth, naturally, and want to use them. as in ear monitors. Where my band practices we mic all our cabinets and mic the kick drum, snare and a couple overheads thru a 12 channel analog mixer ( forget the model) to the PA.

Was trying to figure out a way to use a bluetooth transmitter ( with RCA left/right) to transmit the stereo signal of the output to the headphones but still retain the ability to increase/decrease my guitar signal with the stereo mix as needed. I sometimes have trouble hearing myself definitively in the mix, even thru the monitors facing the band. Thought this might be a solution.

Was hoping someone might be able to help me figure out if this is possible.

Thanks for reading.
#4
Personally I think you are making a mistake in attempting this. In ear monitors are specifically designed for this type of situation and can withstand the kind of volume needed to get over the often extreme on stage volume. It's one of the reasons these systems are so expensive. If you can't hear yourself over the PA and a set on monitors facing you, a Bluetooth headphone will not solve this problem. Controlling on stage volume is a real challenge in every band I have ever been in. It starts by players saying they can't hear the vocals so you buy a monitor system, then everyone turns up more. The next step is players saying the monitors are too small or weak so you buy bigger monitors with more power, then everyone turns up. Then the band buys an expensive in ear monitor system. Now no one can talk to each other on stage without removing the ear pieces. It's a vicious cycle because the source of the problem (the on stage volume issue) doesn't get addressed.

Do you need to mic amps and drums to practice?
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Mar 24, 2016,
#5
Bluetooth headphone sends usually have pretty crippling latency that makes them fine for listening to iTunes at home and impossible to use live while playing along with a band. Some recent systems are now claiming low latency but they are expensive and I have not used them.

If you can't hear yourself onstage or in rehearsal:
1. Get the whole band to turn the feck down.
2 get your amp close to you (within 5 feet) pointed at your ears, not your knees.
3. Mic'd drums for rehearsal? Really? Someone is on a massive ego trip. Mics reinforce the sound and always make it louder. A drum kit is often too loud to begin with for rehearsal to hear vocals clearly. Can the drum and amp mics.

Get control of your stage and rehearsal volume now before everyone has lost their hearing (not joking). If they are not willing, find a new band.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Mar 24, 2016,
#6
+1 on everything Cajundaddy said. I didn't think about the latency issue but I'm sure that's very significant. In ear monitors are meant to do two things. One is to reduce stage volume and the other is to let you clearly hear the mix sent to the monitor/ear piece. Your Sony headphones won't do either very well.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#7
Thanks for your suggestions and input. Going to try some suggestions next practice. Yeah was reading up and was hearing about possible latency issues. The headphones are noise isolating cant hear much with them in. Theyre not cheap headphones.

The shape of the room is awkward and the acoustics suck. Singer was feeding back so we tried mics on the amps and messed around with levels and somehow it helped. The drums are not mic'd during practice they're mic'd for recording and since they were thought maybe I'd mix them in low if this was doable. Drummer has a heavy set of hands thats just him. Maybe tilting my cab back will be enough.

The problem was only for a song or two with very tight rhythm playing that was sometimes hard to hear how tight i was with the other guitarist. Really want to make sure everything is spot on. As always great advice from great people. I appreciate your time responding.
#8
Just a simple headphone extension cord from your mixer headphone out will feed the headphones plenty of signal with no latency. A decent $100 set of Shure IEMs will give you a lot of isolation from the room.
http://www.sweetwater.com/c454--Shure--In_Ear_Monitors?adpos=1t2&creative=105744826681&device=c&matchtype=b&network=g&gclid=CNS4pcuZ2ssCFYqPfgod17wB1w

Rolls also makes a small headphone mixer to power up to 6 phones with individual volume control. That is what we use when recording together live in our rehearsal studio.

For regular band practice we really work on keeping levels as low as possible for a rock band. With 4 guys who sing we need to hear each other well for cues and phrasing so the only thing we run through the board is 4 vocals and keys. Our drummer can be a hard hitter but has pretty good control these days. If he gets too loud we make him go all Ringo dampening. Amps can always be turned down. Players just have to want to.

http://www.ringosbeatlekits.com/Muffling_Techniques.html
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Mar 24, 2016,
#9
cajun you are the best thanks alot. Think I'm gonna get the shure's you recomended. Was just trying to save some cash with what i have. Thought i had a bright idea! LOL!!