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#1
Fatherland sounds paternal and strong, but I prefer motherland. A country should be female, like a ship.
Quote by jakesmellspoo
ooh look at me i'm ERIKLENSHERR and i work at fancy pants desk jobs and wear ties and ply barely legal girls with weed and booze i'm such a classy motherfucker.
#3
fairygodmotherland
it's all just coming back
it's all coming back

it's all coming back to me
#4
"Motherland" means the country that you yourself are originally from.

"Fatherland" means the country that your ancestors are originally from.
#6
Quote by bradulator
"Motherland" means the country that you yourself are originally from.

"Fatherland" means the country that your ancestors are originally from.

This is a great answer
#7
Quote by bradulator at #33892307
"Motherland" means the country that you yourself are originally from.

"Fatherland" means the country that your ancestors are originally from.

did you make this up orrr
Quote by jakesmellspoo
ooh look at me i'm ERIKLENSHERR and i work at fancy pants desk jobs and wear ties and ply barely legal girls with weed and booze i'm such a classy motherfucker.
#11
britain is definitely a motherland

germany is definitely a fatherland

Quote by bradulator at #33892395
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/motherland

motherland: a country regarded as a place of origin (as of an idea or a movement)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatherland

Fatherland is the nation of one's "fathers", "forefathers" or "patriarchs"


dictionary definition is not the be all and end all

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatherland#Groups_that_refer_to_their_native_country_as_a_.22fatherland.22
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


Last edited by Trowzaa at Mar 23, 2016,
#12
Is Italy a motherland or fatherland? It seems kind of hermaphroditic and liable to change.
#13
lol @ "the Swedes as Fädernesland"

Sweden's not fatherland material sorry.
Quote by jakesmellspoo
ooh look at me i'm ERIKLENSHERR and i work at fancy pants desk jobs and wear ties and ply barely legal girls with weed and booze i'm such a classy motherfucker.
#15
Since we live in an anti-male society, motherland is definitely politically correct.
Quote by James Hetfield
Justice is lost, Justice is raped, Justice is GONE.

http://www.youtube.com/intwernet
Guitar and acoustic bass covers with creative editing
#17
Quote by Joshua Garcia
Pretty sure my fatherland is Mongolia.


Pretty sure Genghis Khan personally impregnated half of Europe so everyone's fatherland is Mongolia.
My old signature was too long. Have a daisy.

#19
Quote by bradulator
"Motherland" means the country that you yourself are originally from.

"Fatherland" means the country that your ancestors are originally from.

I've heard "motherland" used for both definitions but I've only seen "fatherland" in books.


Maybe it's just that the countries I hear about are considered female
cat
#20
Okay so since we're on the topic, Russian or pretty much any other Slavic nation never referred to their country as 'motherland', I don't even think there are country related words in most of these languages that would refer a mother.

I know that in Russian they say otečestvo which if anything would be translated as 'fatherland' although there's no specific part of the word which could be translated to 'land' on its own.

In Slovene we have a similar but archaic word 'očetnjava' but I've only ever heard it used once. The much more common word used, which I know also exists in Croatian is 'domovina' which should be translated to 'homeland' although again there is no part of the word that could be directly translated to 'land'.

That is all.

edit: Although it has to be said that that both očetnjava and domovina are female words. I'm not sure about otečevstvo but it sounds like it's in neuter or male form, definitely not female though.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
Last edited by JamSessionFreak at Mar 24, 2016,
#21
Quote by JamSessionFreak
Okay so since we're on the topic, Russian or pretty much any other Slavic nation never referred to their country as 'motherland', I don't even think there are words in most of these languages that would refer a mother.

I know that in Russian they say otečestvo which if anything would be translated as 'fatherland' although there's no specific part of the word which could be translated to 'land' on its own.

In Slovene we have a similar but archaic word 'očetnjava' but I've only ever heard it used once. The much more common word used, which I know also exists in Croatian is 'domovina' which should be translated to 'homeland' although again there is no part of the word that could be directly translated to 'land'.

That is all.

This is because all Slavic peoples are patriarchal oppressive shitlords.
#22
can confirm


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#23
Quote by intwernet
Since we live in an anti-male society, motherland is definitely politically correct.

exactement
#24
In Dutch you'll find the terms ('moederland' and 'vaderland') used interchangeably nowadays, but the fatherland is the country of origin, and motherland is historically related to colonies. If a country has(/had) colonies, it is said to be the motherland of the people in those countries.
#25
Motherland is supposed to be something you protect, like your mother, and a fatherland is something that's supposed to beat the shit out of other countries, like you father.
#26
Quote by JamSessionFreak
Okay so since we're on the topic, Russian or pretty much any other Slavic nation never referred to their country as 'motherland', I don't even think there are country related words in most of these languages that would refer a mother.

I know that in Russian they say otečestvo which if anything would be translated as 'fatherland' although there's no specific part of the word which could be translated to 'land' on its own.

In Slovene we have a similar but archaic word 'očetnjava' but I've only ever heard it used once. The much more common word used, which I know also exists in Croatian is 'domovina' which should be translated to 'homeland' although again there is no part of the word that could be directly translated to 'land'.

That is all.

edit: Although it has to be said that that both očetnjava and domovina are female words. I'm not sure about otečevstvo but it sounds like it's in neuter or male form, definitely not female though.

Are you kidding me have you seen ww2 Soviet agitprop.

Last edited by WaterGod at Mar 24, 2016,
#28
Quote by WaterGod
Are you kidding me have you seen ww2 Soviet agitprop.


You do understand the difference between the word 'motherland' and the maternal personification of a country right?

I don't speak Russian but I can't find anything on that poster which could be equated to 'motherland'.

Rodina, assuming that it is equal to our rodbina, is a bit hard to explain but it is similar to 'kinship' in a way. It is a familial naming of the nation, not a maternal one.

Based on common words from Slovene and Serbo-Croatian I'm assuming 'Rodina mat' zovet' means something along the lines of 'mother Homeland is calling'. We have something similar from the WW2 era - Mati Slovenija or mati domovina.

It's a personification of the nation or country but it is not 'motherland', in the same way France is normally portrayed as a woman but 'patrie' still stems from a Latin word relating to 'father'.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#29
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_personification
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mother_Russia

Mother Russia (Russian: Россия-Матушка, transliterated as Rossiya-Matushka) is a national personification of Russia, appearing in patriotic posters, statues etc. The usage of the term "mother" in reference to a nation or culture symbolizes the "spirit of collectivity".[1] In the former Soviet period, the term Rodina-Mat (Родина-Мать,"Mother-Homeland") was preferred, as it represented the multi-ethnic Soviet Union, and was especially used to commemorate the Great Patriotic War.


I am great and a linguistic visionary.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#30
Quote by Aeolian Harmony
rhetorically asking Jam if he's seen Soviet agitprop lol



Quote by JamSessionFreak

nice

In Portuguese we say pátria, which like Jam said for French, is derived from father.

Here, have some dictatorship-era propaganda with that word on it, since we're in that kind of mood:
#32
Quote by ultimate-slash
In Dutch you'll find the terms ('moederland' and 'vaderland') used interchangeably nowadays, but the fatherland is the country of origin, and motherland is historically related to colonies. If a country has(/had) colonies, it is said to be the motherland of the people in those countries.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exCYSfQod14
#34
Quote by JamSessionFreak
You do understand the difference between the word 'motherland' and the maternal personification of a country right?

I don't speak Russian but I can't find anything on that poster which could be equated to 'motherland'.

Rodina, assuming that it is equal to our rodbina, is a bit hard to explain but it is similar to 'kinship' in a way. It is a familial naming of the nation, not a maternal one.

Based on common words from Slovene and Serbo-Croatian I'm assuming 'Rodina mat' zovet' means something along the lines of 'mother Homeland is calling'. We have something similar from the WW2 era - Mati Slovenija or mati domovina.

It's a personification of the nation or country but it is not 'motherland', in the same way France is normally portrayed as a woman but 'patrie' still stems from a Latin word relating to 'father'.

Okay, I don't understand the difference between those two concepts, but in America we just say the homeland.
#35
quit forcing gender roles on your country shitlord
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#36
I have never heard the term "fatherland" but I have heard the term "motherland". Cool, so now I have.
#39
Quote by ErikLensherr
lol @ "the Swedes as Fädernesland"

Sweden's not fatherland material sorry.

nice post
#40
Quote by WaterGod
Okay, I don't understand the difference between those two concepts, but in America we just say the homeland.

Same thing as Uncle Sam versus 'homeland'.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
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