#1
Just bought a used Gibson SG, but it seems like the heights in the tune-o-metic part (the part where the strings feed) and the saddles where the strings would lay are all wonky. It was a project guitar that hasn't seen the light of day and will stay in tune but the intonation is all done for. Never have had to do this, I know there's tutorials on how to fix the intonation but it all starts off as if the tune-o-matic bridge and the saddles (not the saddles themselves the whole piece itself) were already in the necessary spot to begin to change the intonation

Any help? It's as bad as it gets, one side is completely lobsided
#2
Quote by BrownGibsonDude
Just bought a used Gibson SG, but it seems like the heights in the tune-o-metic part (the part where the strings feed) and the saddles where the strings would lay are all wonky. It was a project guitar that hasn't seen the light of day and will stay in tune but the intonation is all done for. Never have had to do this, I know there's tutorials on how to fix the intonation but it all starts off as if the tune-o-matic bridge and the saddles (not the saddles themselves the whole piece itself) were already in the necessary spot to begin to change the intonation

Any help? It's as bad as it gets, one side is completely lobsided

Pics would help.
#3
Yes, pics would help, but I think you are saying that the bridge is in the wrong place. If so, you need to measure some distances. The distance from the nut to the middle of 12th fret is half the scale length. The string length (nut to saddle) should be about 1mm more than the scale length for the 1st string, and about and about 4mm for the 6th string. The exact measurements vary with string and type.

The Stewmac fret position calculator also shows bridge distances:

http://www.stewmac.com/FretCalculator
#4
Apologies for asking what might be an insulting question, but are you talking about the angle of the piece with the saddles? Because the side with the high strings is supposed to be angled more towards the pickup.