#1
When playing on like fret 11-20 on low e string are they suppose to sound so bright and glass-like? Its so different from 1-10 on the frets. Dont know how to explain.

Or do I fix it by screwing the bridge? I've seen some videos of it.
#2
Let's say you're playing the G on the 15th fret of the low E string, it'll sound slightly different in timbre than playing the same G on the 10th fret of the A string, even though they're the same note. This is normal

However there shouldn't be a HUGE difference in tone when you switch from one end of the board to the next. Use a tuner and see if the notes on those frets are in tune. It might be an intonation problem(?)

These are the notes that should appear on your tuner when you pluck:




Could you give us a rundown of all your equipment and maybe a bit more description of the sound you're getting?

Is the same thing happening on the other strings?

Also happy easter

EDIT: Don't start blindly screwing around with your neck,. truss rod, springs or whatnot. You're not likely to break anything but you might exarcebate the issue
Last edited by flexiblemile at Mar 27, 2016,
#3
A string on fret 2 and 14 are B instead of D and I only have an beginner setup with a fender strat. I heard many ppl dont like them and that they are not so good
#4
Strats aren't everyone's cup of tea but they're great instruments (unless you mean something like a Squier Bullet, but presumably Fender means Fender). It's difficult to tell if what you're describing is normal or not because without hearing it we don't know how big a difference it is.
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#5
I tried to upload a clip awhile ago but it didnt work

Oh wait now it works
Last edited by anderssen at Mar 27, 2016,
#7
Sounds pretty normal to me; certainly the high frets on the lower strings are probably the least-used area of the fretboard because they don't sustain all that well.

As for the power chord thing, if you mean using the open E string, that tends to sound out of tune if you strum it too hard. If you mean higher up the board, it's probably an intonation issue.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Youre officially uber shit now.

Quote by StewieSwan
3d9310rd is far more upset than i 

Quote by Bladez22
I'm a moron tho apparently and everyone should listen to you oh wise pretentious one
#8
I mean everytime I try to play something by like Metallica or something similar ( they tend to use low e and A for powerchords often) my sound is so wierd..
I dont know, maybe I should invest in a Ltd or Esp with humbuckers and not having singelcoils and other strings.
I dont know how big the difference is.

But shouldnt I atleast get a decent sound without amp? without it sounding like on the video
#9
In the video, the notes on either string sound normal, to be honest. I personally think it's a technique problem when you play power chords.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
As for the power chord thing, if you mean using the open E string, that tends to sound out of tune if you strum it too hard. If you mean higher up the board, it's probably an intonation issue.


Intonation and strumming can also be other potential problems. If you strum or finger too hard, you can cause notes to go sharp. Intonation deals with the length of the string and how well notes along the fretboard are in tune.
Skip the username, call me Billy
Last edited by aerosmithfan95 at Mar 27, 2016,
#10
I have tried playing slow faster faster. To me it sounds echoing on power chords but the other strings are fine

Personally i think i need a new guitar
Last edited by anderssen at Mar 27, 2016,
#11
Well you guys are the pros. I wouldnt be suprised if my jaws dropped after I bought a new guitar and amp. :P
#12
Get the guitar set up. And, if it is an echo, as you say, check the term springs. If the notes are sustaining through the springs get some of those insulator thingies that wrap around the springs to dampen them. Take it to a tech and have him look at it. Could be as simple a fix as that.
Old guitar players never die...they just lose the tension in their G strings.
#13
Playing "heavy" music with single coils will never sound like a dual coil unless you are using some form of digital processing.

As far as the sound you are getting, im pretty sure like others have said this is a technique issue.

I would start by blocking that trem, strats with thin pot metal sustain blocks will make an odd resonance via the springs. Secondly before buying a new guitar buy a cheap preloaded humbucker equipped pickguard (if your route cavity allows) can usually be had for around 20-30 dollars...

Then have a tech or experienced person do a good setup and you would be suprised the difference it can make.

I have several 100 dollar guitars that play as good as 2000 dollar instruments.

Also your amp is going to be THE deciding factor in your overall tone!