#1
Hello everyone,

I've one general question that what is the proper way of creating a sound? Where do you even start? How do you adjust the gain/tone of each effect? How should I connect them together, chorus before reverb? Distortion before delay? I just want to know the process of doing so..

If anyone can guide me on what the effects are with words that will be really appreciated.

My last question would be a guide on using BOSS gt100,, I've searched for days but can't find anything good that properly explains the way to create sound..
On gt100 should I use the pre amp or amp sim at all while I'm on stage? Amps I use always changes every show to as big as 100W s..

If you are using gt 100 , please give me some tips and guides you followed..

Thank you all!!
Last edited by Framboaz at Mar 29, 2016,
#2
What amp is it?
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#3
Sorry, I get different shows so amp changes almost every time.. But I even do shows with 100W.. I will edit that part now..
#4
I use multi effects units quite a lot. I have a BOSS ME-50, a Digitech RP255 and a Digitech RP500 (which is the one I currently use). The amps I use can vary between two different amps (VOX and Peavey). On my VOX I bypass all the internal effects and go with just the pedals effects and amp sims so the amp is basically just as flat as possible with all the EQ pretty much flat and no overdrive or distortion on the amp. I get all my sounds from the multi effects pedal. Like anything of this nature you need to spend time programming it, often for many hours. That's normal, there is no way around it.

The BOSS GT100 looks fairly easy to program so you should just sit and take the time to understand how to do it. I downloaded the manual and it looks pretty much like the ME-50 programming instructions. This quick start guide below looks pretty good to get started but you need to get into the main manual for complete instructions..

http://cdn.roland.com/assets/media/pdf/GT-100_Training_Guide.pdf
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Mar 29, 2016,
#5
Full manual is here: http://roland.com/support/article/?q=manuals&p=GT-100&id=62306816

Since you said the amp you run into varies, I suggest to bypass amps altogether and use a direct line out to PA. Get a direct box so you can convert the 1/4 guitar signal the unit puts out into XLR. That way your tone will always be consistent, and there will never be an amp in the way that can color your tone differently then what the GT-100 is doing itself.

As far as actually making good tones come out of the GT-100: Is there an artist that you really like the tone of? Look up what amps they used/are using and find one of a similar make in the GT-100. Distortion, compression, and pitch effects generally go before/in front of an amp, or in your case the amp model. Delays, reverbs go in the effects loop or after the amp. Phaser, filter, chorus, etc. effects can go in either position. Experiment and see what works for you.
#6
Thanks for the great answers,, when you said direct line to PA? What does it mean, sorry I'm not used to the terms.. And also What is XLR?

Mostly the places I play has a mixer(where mics n other instruments connected to) which then goes to the rest of the amps..
A bit more simpler is appreciated My main concern is getting similar sound in different situations
#7
The best way to create a sound is knowing exactly what you want. There are no rules. The most difficult part of using a multi-fx is keeping it simple. The biggest mistake I see is that most new users aren't conservative. You need to figure out what you want and only use what you want. Always start with the preamp and go from there. That's the foundation to your sound. Make sure that's good before moving onto anything else.
#8
+1 to above. That's excellent advice. The simpler you keep it the better. I have seen to many players load up patches where they use 4-5 different effects on one patch and it sounds muddy and buries the guitar.

The XLR is your low impedance output. You can go direct to the mixer without any additional direct box.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#9
Quote by Framboaz
Thanks for the great answers,, when you said direct line to PA? What does it mean, sorry I'm not used to the terms.. And also What is XLR?

Mostly the places I play has a mixer(where mics n other instruments connected to) which then goes to the rest of the amps..
A bit more simpler is appreciated My main concern is getting similar sound in different situations
A direct line to PA means that directly from your multi-effects unit, you have a cable running to the sound board. You properly do this by connecting a guitar/instrument cable from the output of your multi-effects unit to the input of a direct box. The direct box converts the guitar/instrument signal from the multi-effects unit to a balanced XLR signal. XLR cables have 3 pins/holes and they look kind of like a small cylinder. From the direct box is sent an XLR cable, which is what goes to the sound board.

Some multi-effects units have an XLR output built into them, so you wouldn't need a direct box. The GT-100 does not have such an output, though.

This bypasses the backline amps, which are the main source of unwanted color to your sound that is so different then what you hear at practice.
#10
The GT-100 has a newb friendly option, using the EZ Tone matrix, read the manual which explains the use or watch some Youtube vids. You basically select if you want a lead or rhythm tone and how distorted you want it to be. Then it finds the matches for you in its database. Once you get one that you think is close, you edit it further to suit your needs.

Personally, I usually start with everything disabled on the GT-10, which apparently was more simple to do as you had your effect options on the board with on/off buttons.
It is in the FX Chain where you'd see what is listed:


They off course made it more PITA as they got rid of the buttons on the GT-10 to save cost, look at the FX select option here:


Same thing should be accessible now by scrolling through things but it is more click heavy I guess, so I'll start from selecting a clean patch with EZ Tone thing right smack in the middle of the matrix and then looking in the FX Chain and disabling everything that is on and dialing it in from amp emulation first and going on from there.


Look up this guy, he has tons of Boss tutorials and is very detailed:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3BF17s8mfA4

The manual is also a good source, unfortunately with most Boss products, you have to know the manual well.
Last edited by diabolical at Mar 30, 2016,