#1
Hi guys,

I constantly have issue with my pedals volume onstage.

It jumps from super quite to super loud all the time (though it sounds fine with my practice amp).

I have a boost pedal and I want to make things sounds right.

So I want to set up my clean sound to say x dB, distortion/overdrive pedal to +3db.

Boost +3db.

So that, typical song will look like this:
https://gyazo.com/6f6e1e119faea03fb9ac0f9394194cb4

Guys, let me know if you're using same scheme, or if I over complicate things.

Thanks!
#2
So, the boost alone will give you more volume. It's pushing the front of your amp harder, giving you essentially "more" of your amp's gain and volume. Hence the name boost.

The Disto/OD is slamming the front of your amp with gain, aiding the amp in breaking up and coloring the sound as well.

However, if you use both together, you're only going to get the volume dynamic of one of them. Pushing gain into gain is tricky territory when you're trying to level out your volume.

Does your amp have an effects loop? If so, you can achieve the effect you want by running a clean boost into the FX loop and the dirtbox into the preamp. This will mean that your boost will only raise the volume, and will do so regardless of what other pedals you have running.
#3
Well, the thing is that it may be different amps and not all of them have a loop.

I assume that for professional bands this boost thing is done by sound engineer right?

How do you guys do it when you don't have your personal sound guy?
#4
You could try running the boost AFTER the distortion. You just wouldn't get a volume boost from the distortion unless the boost was off.
#5
I have my Gibson SG. It's a 1972 Gibson SG Deluxe. It's an awesome guitar. I adore this one. It has humbuckers and for the reasons for this demo, I need to demonstrat to you a few approaches to accomplish a perfect help signal through a twisted sound and I'll clarify. So on the off chance that you have a circumstance where you have contortion originating from your amp at a high pick up, and say you need a performance to truly pop over whatever remains of the band. A ton of amps will have this inherent. They will have a spotless support, which is essentially they'll have a foot switch. You tap on the spotless help and it'll raise the general expert volume.
Last edited by SaraThompson at Mar 30, 2016,
#6
Quote by SaraThompson
I have my Gibson SG. It's a 1972 Gibson SG Deluxe. It's an awesome guitar. I adore this one. It has humbuckers and for the reasons for this demo, I need to demonstrat to you a few approaches to accomplish a perfect help signal through a twisted sound and I'll clarify. So on the off chance that you have a circumstance where you have contortion originating from your amp at a high pick up, and say you need a performance to truly pop over whatever remains of the band. A ton of amps will have this inherent. They will have a spotless support, which is essentially they'll have a foot switch. You tap on the spotless help and it'll raise the general expert volume.


#7
If you use a boost pedal with a tube amp that is at a high gain, I e is breaking up a lot, kicking in the boost will just cause further saturation instead of a volume increase.
I ended up going for a clean amp with pedals for distortion in order to get the volume control I needed to cut through playing lead, but also play rhythm.
#8
Quote by pashtett
Hi guys,

I constantly have issue with my pedals volume onstage.

It jumps from super quite to super loud all the time (though it sounds fine with my practice amp).!


So if you're using more than one amp, you can't leave it on the same setting for both amps; you'll have to adjust it for each one. Or am I missing something?
#9
Quote by pashtett
Hi guys,

I constantly have issue with my pedals volume onstage.

It jumps from super quite to super loud all the time (though it sounds fine with my practice amp).

I have a boost pedal and I want to make things sounds right.

So I want to set up my clean sound to say x dB, distortion/overdrive pedal to +3db.

Boost +3db.

So that, typical song will look like this:
https://gyazo.com/6f6e1e119faea03fb9ac0f9394194cb4

Guys, let me know if you're using same scheme, or if I over complicate things.

Thanks!


Great question - here is some advice:

1) completely disregard any setting you use at low levels (i.e. bedroom) levels. Boost ( and any other effects ) need to be specifically adjusted for each room and volume situation - so your setting at a jam session will not be the same as at a gig in a bar etc.. Always take a few minutes to adjust your boost pedal when setting up in the context of the band playing. Use your ears, perceived volume is what counts, not the settings on the pedal. I speak from experience on this. This alone will probably solve all your problems.

2) unfortunately for you ( and everyone else), boosting cleans and driven tones are two separate things. If you set a boost pedal for your clean tone - it will react differently when using the overdrive channel on your amp - this has to do with EQ more than anything. It will also react differently if another drive pedal is engaged. the rule is again to use your ears and find the right compromise.

3) Another factor that affects your volume is your EQ on the amp and your guitar pickup selection. If you have any weird drastic settings, certain sounds will pop out much louder - try to get a decent balance on your amp to start - highs shouldn't be overbearing and the lows should be controlled - this should be set at jamming levels in the context of the band playing as well.

The main rule here is that you can't rely on what sounds good in a bedroom at jamming levels. Think of them as two completely different scenarios and have settings for each.
Last edited by reverb66 at Mar 31, 2016,
#10
Thanks guys!

Rever, that was helpful! Indeed I noticed the same thing.

I use distortion and or fuzz for solos. sometimes I add up wah pedal to it which slightly increases volume as well.

Probably the best Idea would be to use boost just to boost up distortion solos. And leave cleans and fuzz on constant levels.
#11
Are you keeping the amp clean and using an OD pedal for crunch and the boost for your lead tone?
You could keep your boost/OD settings the same for every gig and only adjust the amp settings at the different venues.That way you always have two constants and only one variable to contend with at each gig.
However it depends how loud you're playing.If the amp's cranked then the boost pedal can't boost your volume anymore.It will only add more saturation.