#1
I got it for around $200 range on a local guitar store.

Here's an example of me losing sustain easily..

https://soundcloud.com/belstia-wallenstein/november-rain-solo-ver2

Especially the second solo. See 1:30-1:33.

In that song I used some reverb to compensate the lack of sustain.

Tried not to use a lot since it results in too much echo.

I find myself using vibrato a lot, it does help, but the note still dies quickly regardless.

Also I'm using a Marshall MG15CFX.

Any solution for this? And why it happens?
Last edited by janorazen at Mar 30, 2016,
#2
for starters you are using way to much distortion. a MG isn't the best amp going it's just a low end practice amp and your guitar is as well. you can't really expect to nail Slash's tone with that gear.
#3
Quote by monwobobbo
for starters you are using way to much distortion. a MG isn't the best amp going it's just a low end practice amp and your guitar is as well. you can't really expect to nail Slash's tone with that gear.


+1 the pros have tons of money into their rigs, hard to sound like them on the cheap

Back off on your distortion a bit and invest in a tube screamer to boost your gain, it will get you closer, your next investment should be an amp upgrade, I have not been impressed by the MG's.

FWIW nice job on the solo!
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
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Last edited by Evilnine at Mar 29, 2016,
#4
the guitar itself will hardly be a great help in terms of sustain. and +1 to Marshall MG series - just not good enough. if you haven't got the financial capacity for a radical upgrade try installing active pickups like EMGs, keeping stock ones in case you decide to sell the Epi in future. might help with sustain. and yes, too much gain doesn't help either =)
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#5
Quote by Evilnine
+1 the pros have tons of money into their rigs, hard to sound like them on the cheap

Back off on your distortion a bit and invest in a tube screamer to boost your gain, it will get you closer, your next investment should be an amp upgrade, I have not been impressed by the MG's.

FWIW nice job on the solo!


First of all thanks! Slash is better but I always wanted my own version..

Just like you said,I haven't been so impressed by my amp. I had a Mustang I before. And it seems to have sounded much better.. not to mention the variation of effects, and simpler use

I was ripped off in thailand, brought the MG home for $283

Quote by FK_Ultra
the guitar itself will hardly be a great help in terms of sustain. and +1 to Marshall MG series - just not good enough. if you haven't got the financial capacity for a radical upgrade try installing active pickups like EMGs, keeping stock ones in case you decide to sell the Epi in future. might help with sustain. and yes, too much gain doesn't help either =)


this came me to realize I bought a cheaper rig than i thought

what is this radical upgrade you speak of specifically?

there is a gibson les paul for $899 and it is called Les Paul 50's Tribute. 2016.

no money atm but I could work hard for it, or is epi standard better for the value?

-jan
#6
Quote by janorazen

this came me to realize I bought a cheaper rig than i thought

what is this radical upgrade you speak of specifically?

there is a gibson les paul for $899 and it is called Les Paul 50's Tribute. 2016.

no money atm but I could work hard for it, or is epi standard better for the value?

-jan


Yes you were tricked by the word Marshall, upgrading to the Les Paul alone will not solve your problem, you will need to upgrade your amp first!

The Peavey Viper series is a much better choice for an affordable modelling amp, better than Line 6 and the Fender Mustangs for sure.

That would be a good place to start, if you could sell the MG and try to pick up a used Vyper. Then maybe save for a pickup upgrade for the guitar the Epi standard should serve you just fine once your amp has been upgraded, it takes a while to get there when you are on a budget, if only I had all of the gear that I currently own when I was young and in a band (I'm 47)
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#7
A temporary fix could be to get some volume up (not too much as the MG tends to get pretty nasty when it is too loud). It can help a bit to get some "artificial" sustain. Another thing, check your pickup height. You don't want them too close to the pickups, back them off a bit if they are pretty close and this should help.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#8
Quote by dementiacaptain
A temporary fix could be to get some volume up (not too much as the MG tends to get pretty nasty when it is too loud). It can help a bit to get some "artificial" sustain. Another thing, check your pickup height. You don't want them too close to the pickups, back them off a bit if they are pretty close and this should help.


Conversly if your pickups are too far away from the strings you will lose tone and sustain, play with it until you find the sweet spot.

I think a tube screamer in front of the amp for a boost would be a good affordable quick fix, if you upgrade your amp later throw the TS in front of it. There is always room for a tube screamer!
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#9
A tube screamer isn't going to help a solid state practice amp. You need a new amp, plain and simple. Also a delay pedal will help with sustain way more than any tube screamer.
#10
The setup on your guitar will go a long way toward helping you develop sustain. This is the most overlooked and least mentioned factor (IMHO) in developing sustain from the guitar itself, irrespective of gain and electronic tricks.
#11
Quote by J_W
Also a delay pedal will help with sustain way more than any tube screamer.


?????
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#12
Quote by Dave_Mc
?????


never tried it? Just enough delay so you hear no repeating, just enough overlap so that the note rings longer. It's not true sustain, but the effect is there. Try it
#13
oh i see what you mean now. nah i've never tried it. but i'm guessing a tubescreamer will achieve more actual real sustain, as you said.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#14
Quote by J_W
A tube screamer isn't going to help a solid state practice amp. You need a new amp, plain and simple. Also a delay pedal will help with sustain way more than any tube screamer.


HMMM! I have an early 80's Maxxon built Ibanez TS9 that I use it in front of my Mesa Roadster combo, and 6505+ head.

I also use it in front of my SS Randall RG 75 and the difference is night and day, I have used in front of a SS Peavey special 130 with the same result, in fact I even used it i front of my grandson's little Traynor SS practice amp.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#15
Quote by dspellman
The setup on your guitar will go a long way toward helping you develop sustain. This is the most overlooked and least mentioned factor (IMHO) in developing sustain from the guitar itself, irrespective of gain and electronic tricks.



Agree here. Your amp can only do so much with what you feed it. If you are willing to go through and perform a good setup on your axe, or pay someone else to do it, this could greatly improve sustain.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#16
Quote by janorazen


this came me to realize I bought a cheaper rig than i thought

what is this radical upgrade you speak of specifically?

there is a gibson les paul for $899 and it is called Les Paul 50's Tribute. 2016.

no money atm but I could work hard for it, or is epi standard better for the value?

-jan


By radical upgrade i meant a guitar at least $1000 worth and an amp at least $700-1000.

BUT

As many have said and it is generally true in most cases a better amp has bigger impact on the sound of your rig in general.

I'd say that an affordable tube amp (e.g. Randall RG50TC or anything of this sort https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/reviews/guitar_amplifiers/randall/rg50tc/index.html ) should be concerned first.
check those amps for example:
http://www.thomann.de/intl/blackstar_ht_5cr_combo.htm
http://www.thomann.de/intl/bugera_v22_infinium.htm


if you manage to get your hands on a USA Gibson LP it should reward you better than any Epi (no offence to Epi owners, this just comes from my personal experience only). than again, some tube higain amp plus maybe a set of EMGs should work just fine.

There is actually another way around, a bit more affordable. you can buy a Yamaha THR series modeling amp, i got an X version myself and you know, its pretty versatile in terms of dialing in a decent sound at an ear friendly levels + a lot of functionality in terms of effects and home recording as it serves as a USB interface also. My Yamaha serves me as a practice plug n play solution when my Krank can't be used. and being a modeling amp it is a bit less sensitive to the quality of your guitar, especially if you have active pickups.
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#17
Honestly that is some of the best tone I have ever heard from a Marshall MG. Bravo! Usually I can only take a few seconds and it is like fingers on a chalkboard to my ears. Imagine what you could do with a real amp.

So trade that thing in for a Vypyr tube 60, JCA, Traynor, or other Brit voiced tube amp and start making some music.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#18
Quote by Cajundaddy
Honestly that is some of the best tone I have ever heard from a Marshall MG. Bravo! Usually I can only take a few seconds and it is like fingers on a chalkboard to my ears. Imagine what you could do with a real amp.

So trade that thing in for a Vypyr tube 60, JCA, Traynor, or other Brit voiced tube amp and start making some music.


I'll second this, you're definitely being held back by your amp.

You do NOT need a $1,000 guitar, and you damn sure don't need one that says "Gibson" on it, as there are numerous guitars out there that you don't have to pay the headstock premium for. (If you want a Gibson that's cool, but it's not necessary.)

As noted elsewhere above, a good professional setup on your current guitar would probably be a worthwhile investment, and a good amp would have you rocking HARD!
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
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