#1
My girlfriend keeps seeing me playing my electric guitars and she started to get interest in guitars and she told me she don't want to play any crazy stuff like metal or something but she wants to play acoustic guitar and I have absolute no idea about acoustic guitars stuff can any one recommend me a guitar?
-I'm willing to go new only
-Budget not over 400$
-Acoustic/electric (the kind that have a input to an amp)
-Decent electronics (I only know fishman)
that's it
#4
I always recommend a classical (nylon strings) for a first acoustic, easier on the fingers, wider neck to learn to form chords on, action is less of a factor.
#5
Quote by joseph24
My girlfriend keeps seeing me playing my electric guitars and she started to get interest in guitars and she told me she don't want to play any crazy stuff like metal or something but she wants to play acoustic guitar and I have absolute no idea about acoustic guitars stuff can any one recommend me a guitar?
-I'm willing to go new only
-Budget not over 400$
-Acoustic/electric (the kind that have a input to an amp)
-Decent electronics (I only know fishman)
that's it



Why do you need electronics on it? Are you planning on gigging with it? If not then those pickups are just an expensive waste of your money. Plus you aren't going to get a very good guitar for under $400 if you have to have electronics on it anyway (unless you go used). BUT if you just go straight acoustic you can get a lot more quality for your buck than if you go the acoustic/electric route. Plus you don't even know if your girlfriend is going to stick with it...why blow an extra $100 on pickups?

I'd recommend a Taylor BigBaby. It's worth the extra $50-100 you'd pay over a Seagull S6. The neck/action on the Taylor quite simply blows away anything in it's price range (and above it for a good ways). If you absolutely refuse to budge over $400 then maybe you could find a Seagull Entourage or other model. The Epiphone PR-150 is a great guitar for the price and better than "beginner" models have any right to be, and I think new they run about $150.

Good luck. I suggest you rethink getting an acoustic electric and only going new.
#6
I'd spend it on an all-acoustic and then add electronics later if you think you need to. a cutaway is pretty handy for an electric player but it IS hard to find without onboard electronics
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#7
I'd also suggest classical (nylon string) for reason stated above. A steel string acoustic is generally harder on the fingers than an electric, and the pain, bleeding, callouses all tend to discourage some one from sticking with it.

For steel string, I agree with the Yamaha FG series, but also the Ibanez acoustic/electrics are good entry level guitars. Definitely pay for a professional set up that lowers the action as much as possible, and go with the lightest strings possible, as this will reduce the problem of learning on a steel string acoustic.

I tried learning on a steel string acoustic with very high action (I did not know about "action" at the time, though all guitars were like that), and it caused me to shelve the guitar for years before finally picking it back up again and taking it to a luthier who lowered the action, and then I found it bearable to play.
Bernie Sanders for President!
#8
Another vote for the Yamaha FG 700 ish series.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#9
i started with an epiphone aj100 and did not think i should have started with a Nylon...this is a great Thing to start with...and way cheaper than it deserved to be...i just love it. still do after 1.5 years

you should check Sigma guitars, or Harley Benton ( exclusivley traded on thomann )
#11
I like the Washburn 20SCE in that price range, honestly. I have one as a backup guitar and have gigged with it. It plays nice and sounds pretty good plugged in, since you said you wanted electronics. Fishman preamp and built-in tuner.

I don't know what kind of "reputation" Washburn acoustics have these days, really, but it works and I'd encourage a new player to get one if they wanted steel strings with a pickup. Tone wise, it sounds like a much more expensive guitar and as long as its set up properly, I can't think of any downsides.
#15
Quote by Bikewer
Yamaha has just come out with acoustic/electric versions of their very popular "700" series.... Solid top, good Yamaha electronics... A bargain at about 300 bucks:
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/yamaha-fgx700sc-solid-top-cutaway-acoustic-electric-guitar/h74858000002000


+1 Can't go wrong with this guitar at this price. Gotta be 1 of, if not the best bargains out there for a quality acoustic/electric guitar.
#16
Joseph,
after having been on the Frankfurt Music fair last Weekend i suggest you check out Sigma guitars.
"cheapo" Version of Martin, but I did not really recognize a big difference ( None leading to 3000€ difference, i.e. ), especially the full mahagony pieces played nice...
#17
I suggets also that you learn some fingerpicking tunes with your new acoustic guitar. It's hard at the beginning, but very easy at the end. And it's very funny to play
Last edited by rembal at May 11, 2016,
#18
Tanglewood TW133 is a fantastic little parlour guitar that should come in at around $300-350
Redwood AP20s is again another parlour and should be around $100-120.
Most yamahas in that price range.
Tried a few yamahas when I was searching and gotta say they were very consistent.
As she's a beginner I would suggest setting $15-20 aside and buying a set of D'addario EJ35 string.
These are silk and steel 11-47 but are a lower tension than most light or even extra light phosphor bronze string.
The astute among you will notice the EJ35's are for a 12 string. They cost around $3 more than the 6 string set but you get 2 high e strings 2 b string and some of the others will be usable for d and g. I buy the 12 string set because you can't get them individually so if you snap one then you need to buy a full set for a single replacement whereas with the 12 set you have a spare for 2/3 of your strings for less than 1/4 of the price of a set.
Plus with the high e being an 11 fresh fingers are less likely to be turned into bloody flesh ribbons.
Win win all around.
#19
Quote by Thom1989
...[ ] The astute among you will notice the EJ35's are for a 12 string. They cost around $3 more than the 6 string set but you get 2 high e strings 2 b string and some of the others will be usable for d and g. I buy the 12 string set because you can't get them individually so if you snap one then you need to buy a full set for a single replacement whereas with the 12 set you have a spare for 2/3 of your strings for less than 1/4 of the price of a set.
Plus with the high e being an 11 fresh fingers are less likely to be turned into bloody flesh ribbons.
Win win all around.
Actually, there isn't any difference between the plain steels strings, as long as the manufacturer remains the same. In other words, the plain .011 e-1 in silk and steel sets has the same required tension as that in a bronze set.

IIRC, it's the 2 top strings, e- & B-2, which do all the cutting, so you might as well go with 12 string PB lights or "acoustic extra lights", both of which have .010 tops, thus less tension.
#20
Granted the plain string will be no different.
Had a quick nosey and the 80/20 10-47 by d'addario are
7,8,12,12,11,9 (in kg, numbers have been rounded)
The silk and steels are 11-47 and are
9,8,12,10,10,8 (in kg, numbers rounded)

The overall tension is lower which I find makes bar chords easier, something new players may find useful.