#1
Hi,
Here's the story.
Once upon a time (3 years ago) I was into the whole 'shred' stuff. I wanted to improve my picking,legato,scales etc... So I would practice them for hours and hours. Which brings us to day.
My technical skills has improved a lot, but I've got fed up of playing fast as it all sounds the same #%^^%% I actually hate it now
Am now listening to the bands that inspired to play, Mordern,classic rock and indie kinda stuff. The guitar playing has a lot more melody and meaning. They play for the song not for themselves.
So ive paid attention to that how they let the songs 'breath' and how the note choices relate to the chords.
I just wondered how I can became better at creating melodys and melodic solos.
I've been learning songs and listening more but what else can I do?
Thanks!

PS am also a lead guitarist in a band and I've just noticed how must the drummer overplays hitting he's got damn Crash and playing when he should't!
🍗🎹🎶🎼🎧🎤🎮👾🎸🎨🎷⚽️🎱🏁🎺🎻🍮🍰🍪📱👻🐔🐣🐥🐤🐽🐷💀👽💩💸🚽👻
Last edited by Guitar137335 at Apr 1, 2016,
#2
Most beneficial things you can do are:

Learn songs and solos by people you love, by ear. Analyze them and see how they work over the harmony. Also pay close attention the the small things in the playing (the articulation, phrasing, tone, dynamics etc), and try to get as much of that as possible from the records.

Train your ear to hear better. This can be done in many different ways. As said, learning songs by ear is one (and singing them!). Singing intervals/chords/scales/solos, both with and without an instrument.

Practice your scales and arpeggios in a musical way. Pick a progression you want to solo over and then just solo over it with chord tones, then add in scale notes on the up beats, then incorporate more accidentals. Now, this is more of a jazz approach, but it benefits all styles of playing. If you look at great arena rock bands (Europe, Toto, Journey etc) their solos emphasize chord tones to get that really "melodic feel".
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#4
Learning songs and licks note for note should do the trick. If I intend to play a style I haven't ventured a lot in, I learn a few songs and licks and usually things come out of their own.

You may also learn some Blues. Even if you don't intend to be a Blues player, it will definitely help refine skills like bending, vibrato and phrasing.
#5
Deeply explore rhythm ... there's more untapped stuff there by miles compared to note choice.

Listen to how players phrase. Listen to when they don't play ... listen to which part of the bar they start and stop on. Listen for similarities in rhythms uses to develop an idea.

The above begins to add shape to a solo ... it becomes more melodic, more memorable to others.

(I went through exactly the same as you, with the added incentive of injury forcing me to slow down. I studied a lot of theory as well).
#6
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Deeply explore rhythm ... there's more untapped stuff there by miles compared to note choice.

Listen to how players phrase. Listen to when they don't play ... listen to which part of the bar they start and stop on. Listen for similarities in rhythms uses to develop an idea.

The above begins to add shape to a solo ... it becomes more melodic, more memorable to others.

(I went through exactly the same as you, with the added incentive of injury forcing me to slow down. I studied a lot of theory as well).


Thanks, I thought rhythm was important, do you know where I can find any good lessons on this?
🍗🎹🎶🎼🎧🎤🎮👾🎸🎨🎷⚽️🎱🏁🎺🎻🍮🍰🍪📱👻🐔🐣🐥🐤🐽🐷💀👽💩💸🚽👻
#7
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Deeply explore rhythm ... there's more untapped stuff there by miles compared to note choice.

Listen to how players phrase. Listen to when they don't play ... listen to which part of the bar they start and stop on. Listen for similarities in rhythms uses to develop an idea.

The above begins to add shape to a solo ... it becomes more melodic, more memorable to others.

(I went through exactly the same as you, with the added incentive of injury forcing me to slow down. I studied a lot of theory as well).


I agree with this. I think this is an issue that gets overlooked too often. So many players ask questions about how to learn to play more melodically but I think they often are just practicing leads and lead techniques and ignoring the whole chord structure issue. Good melodic leads are based on the chords that the lead is playing over. If you don't know the chords (real chords not just two note power chords), I don't know how you can create a good melodic lead except by accident or just following a pattern.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Apr 2, 2016,