#1
Hello, let me fill you in of why I'm doing it to give you a better understanding.
I'm helping people make a game and the problem is, is that you got to me really good.
I mean REALLY good.


I need to learn to create battle music and nice, peaceful music sounds when going into towns and stuff.

Weakness.
Okay. I have no absolute idea how to read the treble clef. I have tuxguitar and put all my sheet music in there so in can put it all in tab for me.

Strengths.
I know my way through the guitar neck pretty easily and can read tab really well.

Okay, here are some ideas of what I want to try to make.
Battle Music. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fO0Lf1oWg30

Town music. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7yc_NMc--8

So... where do I start?
Last edited by austin.rivera.1 at Apr 3, 2016,
#4
If you can make music, you can make game music.


Just keep making music with a certain mood in mind and go from there. Would help to visualize the place/environment you'd be in and just start playing.
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#6
Quote by Phazon
If you can make music, you can make game music.


Just keep making music with a certain mood in mind and go from there. Would help to visualize the place/environment you'd be in and just start playing.

But how?
#7
I didn't read properly - I thought the videos were you already.

There's no easy answer to your question. Composing itself can be easy, but composing to a brief can be extremely tough. If I was in your position I would map out a few things:

- What is the narrative?
If you know the narrative you can know where you need to add emphasis / dynamics

- What is the mood?
It depends on the narrative, but if there are sad moments, keep it in a minor key, if it's a battle you'll probably want it louder, aggressive and less refined, etc.

- How many pieces do you need?
If there are lots of pieces you may want to have a motif / theme going through them - that you can change according to the mood, that ties all the pieces together. If they only need two pieces then you have a lot more freedom stylistically.

- How long do the pieces need to be?
Again, if they are short pieces the mood is the most important part -the composition has a lot more freedom in terms of key / tempo and even style. If it's a longer piece you really need to think about the sections and how they tie to the narrative or what is happening on screen.

- Do they need to segue into each other?
The only reason for asking this is it makes it a lot easier if they're in the same key


- Are they looking for just guitar or layered tracks?
If you're just recording one guitar it may be tougher to build a bigger sound, but easier in terms of composing and orchestration. If they want a full piece, with backing, then you need to think about all of the above and how to tie them in.

They should give you a very detailed brief, which will help you - the other, most important part, is have a DVR of the game being played and play along, get a feel for it, the style what works. Your music isn't meant to be a standalone piece, it's not there to be critiqued on technique or skill, it's to add something to the experience.
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#8
The more I think about it, the tougher a job this is. Really, you're using all of the tools and techniques at your disposal to capture the action happening on screen.

A good exercise to prepare yourself for this would be to watch TV / certain scenes from films without the sound and try and play along with what's happening.
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'....even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked...."

Do me a favour, pop into Songwriting & Lyrics and add a comment to one thread, any thread, but contribute.

----

www.soundcloud.com/christobaldo
#9
As far as writing music for a game, seems like you'd need some guidance from the game designers. Do they have story boards you could reference?
Towns might be a bit easier to write for. If a town is bustling, prospering, and active, you'd probably do well to have an uptempo, major-sounding theme. A city that is in ruins, or is being oppressed by an evil lord may need slower, more ponderous music--a theme that is minor-keyed and full of tension.
But really it's about how the music will fit into the scenes, so adequate communication with the game designers will be key.
#10
Quote by Herr Rararr
I didn't read properly - I thought the videos were you already.

There's no easy answer to your question. Composing itself can be easy, but composing to a brief can be extremely tough. If I was in your position I would map out a few things:

- What is the narrative?
If you know the narrative you can know where you need to add emphasis / dynamics

- What is the mood?
It depends on the narrative, but if there are sad moments, keep it in a minor key, if it's a battle you'll probably want it louder, aggressive and less refined, etc.

- How many pieces do you need?
If there are lots of pieces you may want to have a motif / theme going through them - that you can change according to the mood, that ties all the pieces together. If they only need two pieces then you have a lot more freedom stylistically.

- How long do the pieces need to be?
Again, if they are short pieces the mood is the most important part -the composition has a lot more freedom in terms of key / tempo and even style. If it's a longer piece you really need to think about the sections and how they tie to the narrative or what is happening on screen.

- Do they need to segue into each other?
The only reason for asking this is it makes it a lot easier if they're in the same key


- Are they looking for just guitar or layered tracks?
If you're just recording one guitar it may be tougher to build a bigger sound, but easier in terms of composing and orchestration. If they want a full piece, with backing, then you need to think about all of the above and how to tie them in.

They should give you a very detailed brief, which will help you - the other, most important part, is have a DVR of the game being played and play along, get a feel for it, the style what works. Your music isn't meant to be a standalone piece, it's not there to be critiqued on technique or skill, it's to add something to the experience.


Well basically, it's a free roam game. So there isn't really a specific story line.
Right now, I need a nice, harmonious sounds for town music and also thrilling sounds for battles and versing bosses.
#11
There will still be plot points, or sequences that are not free-roam.

Again, you need a detailed brief from the game designers and then you can compose. There's not much more advice to give now - it's down to you to make the music. If that feels far beyond your ability then it's probably too advanced a project you've taken on. Look at other game music, look at the structures abd dynamics, try to recreate it without ripping it off - it's a way to start understanding how to create.
|
'....even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked...."

Do me a favour, pop into Songwriting & Lyrics and add a comment to one thread, any thread, but contribute.

----

www.soundcloud.com/christobaldo