#1
Just bought a set of bright nickel wound. Not sure what to make of it. Sounds tinny like phos bronze acoustic strings. Turning the presence and bass settings up helped.
What kind of strings do y'all use? I understand flat wounds are usu for jazz, but have little fret noise......a more flat tone, though.
I read that Geddy Lee uses steel swing strings. Geezer Butler uses coated k3 strings.
#2
Which brand of strings?

And how long ago have you put them on? Some strings take a couple of days before starting to sound at their best.
#4
Quote by bar2271
Dunlop strings.
Had them a few days. May just need a little more time.


Don't have any experience with Dunlop bass strings.

If you really don't like them, then try some other brand next time. I like Daddarios nickel roundwounds myself, but also heard great stuff from Ernie Ball, DR and GHS Boomers.
#5
I find that .045 G strings too thin and weak so I always put on a .055 to get more punch.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#6
After years of using Rotosound Swing Bass 66, a few years ago I switched to DR High Beams. Never used Dunlop so I can't speak to them, but my first question would be - is this your first time using round wounds?
#7
Quote by John Swift
I find that .045 G strings too thin and weak so I always put on a .055 to get more punch.


So you buy 2 sets? What's the other strings?
I'm using .045 .065 .085 .105
It was actually a 5 string set, so I could drop the 045 and use the .125 for the e string which would make it .065 .085 .105 .125
#8
Quote by smtp4me
After years of using Rotosound Swing Bass 66, a few years ago I switched to DR High Beams. Never used Dunlop so I can't speak to them, but my first question would be - is this your first time using round wounds?


I bought the bass used, and it had round wound on it. It seems like the g string is lighter than what was on it to begin with, so it may have been a .055.
I may just go in a music store, and see if they have basses with different strings so I can see what they sound and feel like.
#9
Quote by bar2271
I bought the bass used, and it had round wound on it. It seems like the g string is lighter than what was on it to begin with, so it may have been a .055.
I may just go in a music store, and see if they have basses with different strings so I can see what they sound and feel like.


Maybe this is an obvious statement, but like many things - string choice is subjective. Bass strings come in several primary types. I have listed them below from "dull" (flat wound) to "bright" (round wound):

Flat wound (also tape wound)
Half wound
Pressure wound
Round wound

You can lookup the characteristics and differences of each. There are other attributes that affect string sound - metal/material (stainless steel vs. nickel), string gauge etc. Thicker strings have a deeper (more bass) tone and thinner strings have a brighter tone. Personally, I use .40, .60, .80, .100. They have the right balance for me. You are on the right track - see if you local store has basses with different gauge strings on them, and try until you find the right one. You can of course buy strings until you find the right gauge, but bass strings can be expensive. Regardless of whether you try them at the local store, or buy them - my suggestion is that after you play a particular gauge, make sure the next one is only different by one level - for example if you try .45 to .105 first, try .50 to .110 or .40 to .100 next. If you jump more than one gauge you will feel a big difference and might not get a true sense of a particular gauge.

Sorry for the long-winded reply.
#10
I am partial to nickel-plated strings; GHS Boomers are my go-to string. Rotosound Nickel-plated are my second choice.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#11
Quote by FatalGear41
I am partial to nickel-plated strings; GHS Boomers are my go-to string. Rotosound Nickel-plated are my second choice.


I use stainless on my fretted bass, and nickel-plated on my fretless (both round wounds).
#12
Quote by smtp4me
Maybe this is an obvious statement, but like many things - string choice is subjective. Bass strings come in several primary types. I have listed them below from "dull" (flat wound) to "bright" (round wound):

Flat wound (also tape wound)
Half wound
Pressure wound
Round wound

You can lookup the characteristics and differences of each. There are other attributes that affect string sound - metal/material (stainless steel vs. nickel), string gauge etc. Thicker strings have a deeper (more bass) tone and thinner strings have a brighter tone. Personally, I use .40, .60, .80, .100. They have the right balance for me. You are on the right track - see if you local store has basses with different gauge strings on them, and try until you find the right one. You can of course buy strings until you find the right gauge, but bass strings can be expensive. Regardless of whether you try them at the local store, or buy them - my suggestion is that after you play a particular gauge, make sure the next one is only different by one level - for example if you try .45 to .105 first, try .50 to .110 or .40 to .100 next. If you jump more than one gauge you will feel a big difference and might not get a true sense of a particular gauge.

Sorry for the long-winded reply.



So what I need to determine is the type of sound I want. I think flatwounds may be what I need, as I have trouble getting consistency with the roundwound. Sometimes it's sharp, sometimes, flat sound. Some of that has to do with hand positioning as well. Some lay the palm flat and pull the strings, other method is to keep them vertical and play across the top of the strings, which gives a sharper sound.
I'm still learning, it's all new to me right now.
#13
Flatwound master race checking in

shun the unbelievers with their tinny sounding steel rounds
#14
Quote by bar2271
So what I need to determine is the type of sound I want. I think flatwounds may be what I need, as I have trouble getting consistency with the roundwound. Sometimes it's sharp, sometimes, flat sound. Some of that has to do with hand positioning as well. Some lay the palm flat and pull the strings, other method is to keep them vertical and play across the top of the strings, which gives a sharper sound.
I'm still learning, it's all new to me right now.


True. As you continue to play you will learn the subtle differences in technique that alter the tone. For example, plucking near the neck vs. near the bridge, plucking with the end tips of your fingers vs. further down on the tips, using a pick/plectrum if you choose, using the end tips or "meat" of the tips on your fretting hand.

For a beginner it can be overwhelming - string choice, technique, EQ, amp settings, even the wood used to make the bass can affect tone - the list is almost endless. In fact, you can play two identical basses from the same manufacturer and they might sound slightly different because each one is made from different pieces of wood. Over time you will develop an ear for these differences and eventually develop your own unique tone. Sounds like you are on the right track
#17
Quote by haggard191


I'm a little confused. How can these two sets be rated heavy and medium though they both have the same gauge?
http://www.ebay.com/sch/items/?_nkw=Dunlop+Lemmy+signature+bass+strings&_sacat=&_ex_kw=&_mPrRngCbx=1&_udlo=&_udhi=&_sop=12&_fpos=&_fspt=1&_sadis=&LH_CAds=&rmvSB=true

The do look like they have more midrange punch. Have to listen to some Motorhead to see if I like it. Thanks for the links.
#18
Quote by bar2271
So you buy 2 sets? What's the other strings?
I'm using .045 .065 .085 .105
It was actually a 5 string set, so I could drop the 045 and use the .125 for the e string which would make it .065 .085 .105 .125

No I buy an extra string which is a .055 whenever I re-string.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#19
I use DR Lo-Riders on my fretted and fretless. I didn't like 'em at first cause they grab your fingers pretty bad for sliding, but after you get some gunk built up on the strings they break in and feel normal. Strings can be tricky, and on a bass, expensive to find what you like.
#20
I'm a big fan of the Roto swing 66. Very bright sounding, and they stay that way for an extended period of time. It's a solid route if bright and aggressive is what your going for.
#22
These Dunlops sound a lot better if I tune them down half a step and play some Alice & Chains.
#23
boomers
Ibanez Rg 321mh
Squier Classic Vibe 1970s Precision Bass
Guitar Rig 5
Presonus Audiobox
Behringer Truth B2030A