#1
Hello im a beginner wanting to get into recording/mixing/mastering. Iv been playing around with it for a few years so im familiar with the program I use and how to record drums, amps, ect. So far the only recording gear all I own is an sm57, broom mic stand and an 2 channel audio interface. I don't have studio monitors but I use a nice set of speakers and a sub also some nice bose headphones for monitoring wile recording and they seem to work. I use fl studio (producer edition) and it comes with some pretty great plugins.

I play guitar, bass, and understand the concepts of drums/percussion and how to create tracks with drum machine but I cant play them physically well, very well. what Im wanting to know is where should I go next? Im wanting to get serious into recording such as in a career. I am still in high school and have no job currently but im wanting to know where should I go next with this?

should I go for: new monitors+sub? more microphones/interfaces? premium plugins? Im on a very tight budget right now but it will open up more in the future (when I get a job lol). I own a crate flexwave head and a 212 cab. a 1x10 fender bass amp. a schecter hellraiser. a cheap bass. Im more of a guitarist than anything. I play a lot of metal but I also have done some electronic music as well. I play just about anything but country of course haha.

Another thing is if any of you have some empty projects (like recordings) with no intention of being produced or sold, im looking for anything I could do to practice. Im not gonna ask for any money of course and I wont release them but just for my practice and I could show you the result if you wanted.

So I know this is a little messy and cluttered but could some of you experienced DeeJay's/Audio engineers share your important and useful knowledge with me or even work with me and help train me? I would really appreciate it if you guys did
Well I know this is a lot but thanks for taking the time and reading
#2
Look at where you want to go.

I wanted to be a mixing engineer, and bought gear to do so. I found out that I'm far better at tracking and editing than I'll ever be at mixing, so now my thoughts on gear have changed from plugins/gear that get great sounds to having great knowledge of phase relations and mic techniques.

For your situation, I'd look at getting 1 good large diaphragm condensor (I know a lot of guys started with MXL or Rode, I still use some Rode mics to this day) to start.

What interface do you have already? I don't think that getting a bigger or newer one would be ideal at this time as you're still learning and may realize that recording music isn't your thing. I know a lot of people who dropped a big wad of cash and realized that being an AE is not as fun/exciting as they thought it would be and sold everything off at a loss.

As I stated, look at 1 decent LDC (like an MXL 990 or even a Blue Bluebird), maybe a 1 or 2 channel preamp and go from there.

When I started recording my rig was a used Digi001, some random Soundcraft 8 channel mixer, a TC Electronics effects unit (don't remember which one) and some random crap mics.
Quote by Watterboy
Do you have any dilithium crystals or fresh warm dumps for sale
#3
Iv just got a presonus audiobox 2x2 usb interface with 48v phantom power so condensers would work with it. have you had any experience with guitar mulitracking?
#4
Lots.

Most commonly I'd use a 57 with a LDC.

57 on cone to suit your fancy.
LDC back 1 exact foot pointing at the center of the cone. Blend them to get the sound you want.

The 57 will provide he punch and grit, the LDc adds some air and room sound. This will also give some flexibility to your sound. You'll find that while a guitar sounds great on it's own, it's a complete turd in a mix, and sometimes a guitar that sounds like ass on it's own will sound massive in a mix.

The biggest thing I can express is to experiment with sounds. Try putting a mic in the back of a open cabinet. Try putting a mic in a tube that's pointing at the speaker. Put your cabinet on an open metal garbage can with a mic in it; you never know what will and won't work unless you try.
Quote by Watterboy
Do you have any dilithium crystals or fresh warm dumps for sale
Last edited by the chemist at Apr 4, 2016,
#5
thanks! Ill try it out. Ill try my best just with the 57 for now until I could invest in a condenser of some sort.
#6
Dont bother buying anything for a bit. Practice practice practice. Try getting your mixes as close to professional commercial quality as you can with the gear that you have. Watch a lot of tutorials and learn absolutely everything you can through trial and error. Then, once youve done all that, hopefully youve saved up some cash and can afford to buy more and nicer equipment to suit your fancy
Quote by suckmahnuts
Watterboy, I love you.

Quote by davrossss
You are now my favourite person on UG.....You write cool shit.

Quote by wannabestoner69


#7
When you say tight budget how tight are we talking. And what type of music are you seeking to record.

The reason I ask is because that will help us guide you on where the best areas to invest are...

So for example.

Do you have a decent computer? If not that may be the first thing to invest in, a really really really old computer will drive you nuts recording a serious project.

If you have a mac Logic Pro X comes with excellent tools built in that do the same as the alternatives below.

If you don't have great amps on a budget for metal i would say get Peavey Revalver software. It will sound like an amp and a real good one if you set it up correctly. If you insist on recording the real amps for the sm57 will do. I usually blend a 57 with a royer. But trust me, the sm57 alone will get you that sound. Logic Pro X's amp designer though not as good will certainly get the job done.

If you can't play drums very well, get a plugin with some built in grooves.. I even record my drums with an electronic drumkit triggering one of these softwares. On a budget I'd recommend easy drummer, and in a bigger budget BFD3 which in my opinion is the best of the best. If you own a Mac I'd say use Logic Pro X. It has excellent drums and grooves, and really great amp sims.
#8
Quote by nyandres
When you say tight budget how tight are we talking. And what type of music are you seeking to record.

The reason I ask is because that will help us guide you on where the best areas to invest are...

So for example.

Do you have a decent computer? If not that may be the first thing to invest in, a really really really old computer will drive you nuts recording a serious project.

If you have a mac Logic Pro X comes with excellent tools built in that do the same as the alternatives below.

If you don't have great amps on a budget for metal i would say get Peavey Revalver software. It will sound like an amp and a real good one if you set it up correctly. If you insist on recording the real amps for the sm57 will do. I usually blend a 57 with a royer. But trust me, the sm57 alone will get you that sound. Logic Pro X's amp designer though not as good will certainly get the job done.

If you can't play drums very well, get a plugin with some built in grooves.. I even record my drums with an electronic drumkit triggering one of these softwares. On a budget I'd recommend easy drummer, and in a bigger budget BFD3 which in my opinion is the best of the best. If you own a Mac I'd say use Logic Pro X. It has excellent drums and grooves, and really great amp sims.


Umm im seeking to record just about anything but I play a lot of metal(mainly metalcore). I already have FL studio (producer edition) and it comes with a ton of good basic plugins. (limiters, compressors, multiband compressors, paramatic eqs, some effects ect.) Iv used it enough im very familiar with it. Im mainly insisting on recording real amps and was maybe thinking of about a 6505+ mh or something to invest in later on, something small. Tight buget meaning Like I only could get a 100 to 150 dollars to spend about every month or so if I worked my ass off. My pc is pretty good. I run windows 7, only have an I3 dual core (with hypertheading) just over 3.1ghz. 6 gb of ddr3 ram. 1TB seagate SSD hybrid drive and a very nice graphics card that I dont think makes a difference haha.

Thanks for all of your guys help!
Last edited by guitarninjama at Apr 5, 2016,
#9
I would just produce stuff, and look at what you don't like the most, and figure out how to fix that, and learn that way.

You are at a point right now where you're asking other people what to do. You could do that forever, get new gear, make another post asking "what next?". Right? And then maybe you'll get new gear, but you will not really be any further along.

What you want to do, is get to the point where you don't ask questions like that. Where you know how a new mic will benefit you, how a new plugin will benefit you. Where you know what is lacking in your production, where its weaknesses are, and you decide which thing to improve.

Trial and error will help you accomplish that. Learning in an environment where someone that knows what they are talking about, can show you, and explain to you the advantages of different gear, how it works and how it sounds. You can also take what you got, and get as good as you possibly can with that, learn its limitations, and get the next thing to fix that.

So, what I'd do, is more production, to put it simply. Do more until you know what it is you want to make better.

If there is something that's not quite how you want, and you don't know how to get it there, you can ask that specific question, and you'll learn something, perhaps you will learn you need a hardware upgrade to get what you want, or you will learn a technique.

If you ask "what should I get next" which is very general, you will get a number of responses from a number of people, all with different levels of expertise.

I wouldn't use FL studio for what you're doing.

Idk what I'd work on next for you specifically. I'd have to listen to some of your stuff.
#10
Quote by guitarninjama
Iv just got a presonus audiobox 2x2 usb interface with 48v phantom power so condensers would work with it. have you had any experience with guitar mulitracking?


Yes, all the time. I use one condenser (AKG C3000 or AT2020) and a dynamic (AKG D8000 or SM57) and about the same spot on the 1x12 speaker, mix to taste.

As far as what you need, usually a great monitoring system and good acoustic space are probably most important, the rest is secondary.

You are on Studio One, I imagine as you got their interface. It is a great program and learn to work it well. Once you feel confident you can move up to the Professional version which will open up mastering and other capabilities.

If you want to practice sound creation, mixing, mastering, etc. try out some of the collaboration sites, Blend.io, http://www.acidplanet.com/, Kompoz.com and start collaborating on projects or use their remix contests, lots of room to learn with tracks from there.
#11
Quote by diabolical

If you want to practice sound creation, mixing, mastering, etc. try out some of the collaboration sites, Blend.io, http://www.acidplanet.com/, Kompoz.com and start collaborating on projects or use their remix contests, lots of room to learn with tracks from there.


+1, and good call.
Quote by Watterboy
Do you have any dilithium crystals or fresh warm dumps for sale
#12
Where do you go from here? Training, training, training, and practice, practice, practice, and more practice.

Training comes in all forms. YouTube tutorials, books, internships at studios, college, whatever. Find the way you learn best and seek the information in that format.

Check out The Pro Audio Files on YouTube and look for tutorials by David Glenn. You can also sign up on his website and you'll get a free mix bundle with video tutorials and free stems to practice mixing.

When it comes to training, what you'll really need is an understanding of how the different devices work, and some good methods for managing your workflow. Most people make up their own way of doing things and if they're willing to share it, that's a good place for you to start.

In short, learn from other people's mistakes because you won't live long enough to make them all yourself.

Good luck!
#13
the best place to start (though it seems youve received some awesome advice so far) is to get an interface, software and good condenser. I use Rhode. It never lets me down.

Next step would be to purchase other pieces of equipment as you move along. Just know that it will never stop; once you are "finished" something new will come out and you will want it. Just pace yourself and get what you need as you go.
#14
I would definitely look into a new DAW. Fruity Loops never taught me anything useful.
Cubase Elements 8 is about $100. For the price it's a fair investment. Keep your nose
to the grindstone, learn your DAW inside and out, buy cheap/used gear.
Maybe meet some other engineers, see if you can sit in on some of their sessions or something.

Oh, and listen to a lot of music. REALLY critically listen to it.
#15
I'm a guitarist / songwriter rather new to recording and mixing myself, and I got started (on a very tight budget) with a Steinberg UR12, Toontrack EZMix and EZDrummer, Reaper, an SM57 and my guitar. I recorded one song without using monitors and it turned out good enough, but after that I invested in a pair of M-Audio BX5 D2 monitors and the difference was phenomenal; I'd definitely advise you to invest in a pair as your next purchase.
#16
Quote by codykilpatrickk
I would definitely look into a new DAW. Fruity Loops never taught me anything useful.
Cubase Elements 8 is about $100. For the price it's a fair investment. Keep your nose
to the grindstone, learn your DAW inside and out, buy cheap/used gear.
Maybe meet some other engineers, see if you can sit in on some of their sessions or something.

Oh, and listen to a lot of music. REALLY critically listen to it.


I disagree. I use FL studio for metal, and it works fine. Most of the DAWs can get every job done, its just a matter of workflow, I got used to FL cause i started on it and i havent felt the need for a change yet.
#17
I started on Sonar, worked with pretty much every DAW out there but couldn't wrap my head around FL for audio, there was just something very inherently backward with the audio recording features in it IMO. It works for some people, apparently and the plugins in it are top notch, especially loved some of the synths. For its price it is a bargain if you can get used to the workflow...I couldn't.
#18
I tried cubase for a while, and it seemed much more complicated than fl to me. I love the workflow in fl.