#1
Hi,
I've been learning some songs and I've noticed when the rhythm Guitarist plays say a G major chord the lead guitar plays a E minor. Or one guitarist plays a D major chord and the other plays a F sharp minor it's major third.
I need some help on how they work, I mean I guess their almost the same chords...
Idk just need some more info about it.
Thanks!
🍗🎹🎶🎼🎧🎤🎮👾🎸🎨🎷⚽️🎱🏁🎺🎻🍮🍰🍪📱👻🐔🐣🐥🐤🐽🐷💀👽💩💸🚽👻
#2
It really depends on what the bass is playing (kind of) and the chords that come before and after it in the progression.

If the bass is G and you play a G chord and an Em, it is probably a G6 chord. That's a G chord with the 6th scale degree added, in this case E

If the bass is playing E then it's probably an Em7, which is Em with the 7th degree added, in this case D

DMaj plus F#m is almost always DMaj 7. You have D F# A C#.

C# is the M7 of D
#3
Well I don't know about those specific examples (what songs are those?), but stacking triads like that is not an unusual approach.

In the Michael Jackson song "Rock With You", for example, the guitarist plays what looks like a Bbm (or Db6), while the bass plays an Eb. It's also featured in a lot of jazzy/funky music.

It basically lets you get to richer harmonies without taking up a lot of space, in terms of sound. If the bass is playing an E, and the guitar plays a Gmaj triad, that's effectively an Em7 overall. Make it Bm/E and it's an Em11 (no third).

Of course you have to pick chord voicings that work. If you try to play a big fat G barre chord over the bass's E, it's going to sound like one of you is wrong.
#4
Quote by cdgraves

Of course you have to pick chord voicings that work. If you try to play a big fat G barre chord over the bass's E, it's going to sound like one of you is wrong.


This of course activates the "stare and blame" protocol on stage. This is something worth mastering early on. :-)
#5
...and it's important to establish early that if someone is wrong, that someone is the bass player.
#7
Quote by Guitar137335
Hi,
I've been learning some songs and I've noticed when the rhythm Guitarist plays say a G major chord the lead guitar plays a E minor. Or one guitarist plays a D major chord and the other plays a F sharp minor it's major third.
I need some help on how they work, I mean I guess their almost the same chords...
Idk just need some more info about it.
Thanks!
E minor plus G major equals either Em7th or G6th.

At some points in a song, those chords together could perhaps form a useful harmony. But if you're trying to end the song, ouch!

As someone above pointed out, the note in the bass will be critical.

You can try this yourself. Play an F major barre chord at the 1st fret. Now, play the same chord with the e-1 string open. That gives you "F major 7th". It's melodic, wistful, perhaps even weepy and melodramatic.

Now play the same chord with the bottom string (E-6) open... Ouch!
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 6, 2016,
#8
Quote by Captaincranky
E minor plus G major equals either Em7th or G6th.

At some points in a song, those chords together could perhaps form a useful harmony. But if you're trying to end the song, ouch!
Except that 6th chords can make great endings, if you like cheese.
The Beatles ended "She Loves You" with a G6 harmony. George Martin winced because he thought it sounded like the Andrews Sisters....
#9
Quote by jongtr
Except that 6th chords can make great endings, if you like cheese.
The Beatles ended "She Loves You" with a G6 harmony. George Martin winced because he thought it sounded like the Andrews Sisters....
No, if you want cheese, end on a major 7th.

IIRC, The Beatles have done that as well. Maybe you can come up with the when and where of it.

I actually heard a heavy metal piece end on a major 7th the other day. It sounded so cheesy and out of place, I figured the band just wanted to let everybody know they had music lessons. (It was "symphonic metal, and they were likely just showing off).

CODA: Besides, a "wince" from George Martin is nothing more than a non-verbal "ouch", anyway.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 7, 2016,
#10
Quote by Captaincranky
No, if you want cheese, end on a major 7th.
Well, cheese comes in different flavours...
Quote by Captaincranky

IIRC, The Beatles have done that as well. Maybe you can come up with the when and where of that.
Yup - "It Won't Be Long" ends on Emaj7.
That's the only example D Pedler mentions as an ending. They used maj7s liberally in "Goodnight", which was definitely an exercise in cheese max.
Quote by Captaincranky

I actually heard a heavy metal piece end on a major 7th the other day. It sounded so cheesy and out of place, I figured the band just wanted to let everybody know they had music lessons. (It was "symphonic metal, and they were likely just showing off).
That was the feeling I had about the Emaj7 in RHCP's Under The Bridge. It was like "hey folks listen to this great chord we just discovered"....
(That's a little unfair, because it was used entirely appropriately for the self-pitying mood at that point in the song.)
Last edited by jongtr at Apr 7, 2016,
#11
Quote by jongtr
Well, cheese comes in different flavours...
Good one! ROFLMAO

Quote by jongtr
That was the feeling I had about the Emaj7 in RHCP's Under The Bridge. It was like "hey folks listen to this great chord we just discovered"....
(That's a little unfair, because it was used entirely appropriately for the self-pitying mood at that point in the song.)
Exactly. That way, you can blame the music for making you feel sorry for yourself, instead of manning up and owning your self loathing....
#12
Quote by Captaincranky

Exactly. That way, you can blame the music for making you feel sorry for yourself, instead of manning up and owning your self loathing....
LOL.
The lyric just before the chord is

"Sometimes I feel like my only friend
Is the city I live in, the city of angels
Lonely as I am, together we cry"
( > big Emaj7)

- at which point you imagine the city saying "sorry pal, you're on your own"
#15
Quote by cdgraves
Ending on maj6 is way cheese. Good for jazz ballads. Maj7 takes a bit more finesse.
Given the demographic of the average jazz audience, they're quite likely to mistake "cheese" for "sophistication".
#16
Quote by Captaincranky
Given the demographic of the average jazz audience, they're quite likely to mistake "cheese" for "sophistication".


It's always amused me how jazz and classical music both totally overestimate their general audience.

I think it's funny that composers practically have to -try- to offend their audience. Stravinsky made some pretty facked up music before people noticed it was getting weird. And even Zappa had fans, despite trying to offend everyone.
#17
Quote by cdgraves
And even Zappa had fans, despite trying to offend everyone.
Yeah, I think I saw it written in the Bible how on the thirteenth day, God made Howard Stern out of one of Zappa's ribs.
#18
And speaking of maj6 ... I just remembered that the wedding band I'm in does "All About That Bass", and I like to end it on a maj6 with surfy trem bar vibrato. I guess it's more a punch line than an ending.
Last edited by cdgraves at Apr 9, 2016,