#1
I've been looking through some scales (even found a page with a collection of them on Facebook), but most of them post rather complicated spreadsheets that are hard for me to comprehend as of now, for reasons, and besides, it's better to starts from the beginning, right? Anyway, I'd like to be able to do some improvisation rather than writing everything before hand, so I decided I'll invest my time into that now.
What are, say, 3 scales for beginners that you'd recommend as must-know?
#2
I'm not a scalar-type player, so I'm not the best to give advice, but here goes anyway. I would suggest learning the five pentatonic box patterns and how to apply them. They can be used in either minor or major contexts, and can be moved around to accommodate different keys. They can be used with blues and rock, and are versatile enough to be applied to a range of other genres. As I noted, I'm not a scalar player, but with the pentatonics and a few added blue notes, I can kid the audience into thinking I can do a bit of blues lead type playing.
#3
The 12 major scales. Start with 0 accidentals, C, and go in circle of 5ths order so you're adding one sharp/flat each time.

And it's critically important that you work the scales out on your own, rather than learning from a chart. Look up the major scale formula and just start figuring them out.
#5
Thanks for all the input. Major problem for me is that most of these terms are complete enigma to me, and a lot of them don't translate well into my language (or don't translate at all as online dictionaries don't contain a lot of musical terms to begin with), so I'm still not entirely sure what some things mean. Accidentals, 5ths, sharps and flats. So much to learn, all in English! :s

As for your question Jerry, I'm mostly into rock, but I'd like to develop a skill set that lets me go a bit wider than just that.
#6
I've only been playing a short while, but I have become completely consumed by Blues scales. I got a scale book illustrating over 180 scales, just love tinkering with those scales and learning the explanation of what certain terms mean. It is frustrating trying to learn something that you are not sure what the term they are using means.
Flying in a blue dream
#7
MrNewGuy, a lot of classic and modern rock solos are based on the Minor Pentatonic scales. After you've got a good handle on those, look into the Major Pentatonics. Each has five "patterns," giving you a total of ten scales to work with. Memorize these, and know them well. Once you've done that, look at the Major Scale modes. Don't worry yourself too much with the theory behind them until you have them memorized by pattern and are familiar with the notes on the fret board.

These can all be found with a simple search or image search.

Good luck!
#8
Quote by MrNewGuy
Thanks for all the input. Major problem for me is that most of these terms are complete enigma to me, and a lot of them don't translate well into my language (or don't translate at all as online dictionaries don't contain a lot of musical terms to begin with), so I'm still not entirely sure what some things mean. Accidentals, 5ths, sharps and flats. So much to learn, all in English! :s

As for your question Jerry, I'm mostly into rock, but I'd like to develop a skill set that lets me go a bit wider than just that.


I can help you ... my company MusicIncite Ltd have spent several years developing music software (emuso(TM)) and lessons, which will be shipping probably August-September this year. It teaches improvisation and composition. This avoids all the usual jargon, avoids music notation, and instead works visually and aurally. It explains the basic concepts that get used over and over, which books tend to hardly discuss. These concepts avoid note names. This is then built on, up to very advanced, as suits the learner.

We're making this because we are disgusted with how hard conventional books and teaching methods make learning music education appear to be, when the reality is it is actually pretty simple. This is plain wrong, and we passionately believe that everyone should get a fighting chance to learn at least some of these musical tools because of the world of new sounds that opens up ... we want to help folk to unlock their musical potential, rather than get demotivated at the stage they most need motivation ... when they first start learning ...

We are shortly running user trials ... you may want to join in? Need a PC or Mac. Send me a private message.

Give you an idea ... an 8 year girl, no knowledge of music at all, used our concepts in 6 minutes to be in front of a piano, playing a scale and chords from that scale, in a couple of different keys of her choice (even though she had no idea what the actual key was, that's irrelevant at this stage).
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Apr 7, 2016,
#9
Quote by MrNewGuy
I've been looking through some scales (even found a page with a collection of them on Facebook), but most of them post rather complicated spreadsheets that are hard for me to comprehend as of now, for reasons, and besides, it's better to starts from the beginning, right? Anyway, I'd like to be able to do some improvisation rather than writing everything before hand, so I decided I'll invest my time into that now.
What are, say, 3 scales for beginners that you'd recommend as must-know?


You want to learn to improvise - it starts with these 2 things:

1) start learning slow solos by ear - try old blues to start, Albert King and BB King - 60's recordings, or classic rock, where you can hear each note clearly. Doing this is crucial - it consists of listening to a bar, and then trying to find it on the guitar through trial and error. It takes enormous amounts of time at the start but this really works your ear.

2) Learn the C Major scale - always start from the root and learn each interval ( 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, etc. learn it in small manageable clusters - so start with C on the 3rd fret of the A string and play it only up until the next octave. Always be aware of what you are playing in relation to the root note. Don't try learning large extended patterns all over the fretboard, because that's way too much information to take in at once.

It all starts there.
#10
Quote by dickerson_mack
MrNewGuy, a lot of classic and modern rock solos are based on the Minor Pentatonic scales. After you've got a good handle on those, look into the Major Pentatonics. Each has five "patterns," giving you a total of ten scales to work with. Memorize these, and know them well. Once you've done that, look at the Major Scale modes. Don't worry yourself too much with the theory behind them until you have them memorized by pattern and are familiar with the notes on the fret board.

These can all be found with a simple search or image search.

Good luck!


This sounds reasonable, so I guess that's where I'll start off with. Thanks for the advice!

Quote by jerrykramskoy
snip


Appreciate the offer, but if I was able to spend money on tutoring I'd probably have a teacher explaining these things to me in real life instead of bothering people on this forum. :p

Quote by reverb66
You want to learn to improvise - it starts with these 2 things:

1) start learning slow solos by ear - try old blues to start, Albert King and BB King - 60's recordings, or classic rock, where you can hear each note clearly. Doing this is crucial - it consists of listening to a bar, and then trying to find it on the guitar through trial and error. It takes enormous amounts of time at the start but this really works your ear.

2) Learn the C Major scale - always start from the root and learn each interval ( 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, etc. learn it in small manageable clusters - so start with C on the 3rd fret of the A string and play it only up until the next octave. Always be aware of what you are playing in relation to the root note. Don't try learning large extended patterns all over the fretboard, because that's way too much information to take in at once.

It all starts there.


I already have a good ear and problem is that I can take down anything simple very quickly, but I didn't feel like I'm making any progress that way. I'm not actually new to guitar, I just never played in a way that makes me actually remember what's where, and in result I don't actually "know" the neck of the guitar. I'm trying to fix that now! I already looked at some videos, so now I know exactly how scales work, and what's a root note. Thanks for suggestions!
#11
Quote by MrNewGuy
This sounds reasonable, so I guess that's where I'll start off with. Thanks for the advice!


Appreciate the offer, but if I was able to spend money on tutoring I'd probably have a teacher explaining these things to me in real life instead of bothering people on this forum. :p



No money involved for being a trialist. The idea is for you to provide comments on ease of use, stuff you hate, stuff you love, stuff you'd like to see that's missing, as you use emuso. We'd askall trialists to carry out certain actions (we provide a crib sheet) so we can make useful comparisons. For example, click somewhere (say 3rd fret, 5th string) on the "guitar neck". Then use a button to show all duplicates and octaves of the pitch at that fret to create the octave pattern. Move that pattern by dragging. Or use your guitar to play a particular note from a scale pattern showing on the neck. Watch what happens on the "guitar neck". Or create a chord using the menu, and make up (click, touch, or play on your guitar, or sing) an arpeggio pattern from that chord. Set the tempo to play it at, then play it and watch. Or try some ear training and answer a test. Or use menu and "guitar" to build a chord progression using a scale and learn basics of tone tendencies. Etc.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Apr 8, 2016,
#12
Quote by MrNewGuy


I already have a good ear and problem is that I can take down anything simple very quickly, but I didn't feel like I'm making any progress that way. I'm not actually new to guitar, I just never played in a way that makes me actually remember what's where, and in result I don't actually "know" the neck of the guitar. I'm trying to fix that now! I already looked at some videos, so now I know exactly how scales work, and what's a root note. Thanks for suggestions!


In that case, C major should be your first focus - you'll learn your fretboard with that scale ( i.e. where the actual notes are). Learn the harmonized C major scale as well ( i.e. playing a triad or chord for each note of the scale) and learn how to name chords in relation to the intervals of the major scale and to analyse chord progressions using the roman numeral system - this will help a lot.