#1
I've written a song I really like, but the ryhthm guitar part is almost entirely an open low-E and different notes on the A string:

e:|--------------------------------------------|
B:|--------------------------------------------|
G:|--------------------------------------------|
D:|--------------------------------------------|
A:|-7--6-11-11-6--6--7--7--6-11-11-6--|
E:|-0--0--0--0--0--0--0--0--0--0--0--0--| and so on...

The problem is that the difference in A-string notes is very hard to hear, especially at practice with all the other instruments blaring and doing their own complex sh*t. While the rhythm part is indeed quite simple, the differences present are very important.
I know lower notes tend to sound muddier together. Is there a way to counter this with EQ boosting/cutting? I've got a 10-band MXR EQ pedal. Advice?
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#2
No. EQ sees frequencies not what string is at what frequency.
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#3
Issue number one is that your amp likely can't reproduce that low E as a fundamental. Part of the reason is that most guitar speakers fall off quickly below 110Hz, so you're actually listening to a mathematical combination of harmonics that are just *indicating* the existence of that note. And another part of the reason is that it takes some pretty healthy power to reproduce bottom end, and the louder you run the amp, the less power it has available to play those notes in an undistorted form.

Issue number two is that you may not have a long enough guitar scale to really reproduce those notes cleanly. Think of the difference between a spinet piano and a grand piano. The much greater string length produces separation between those bottom five notes on a grand, where the five sound almost identical on a spinet.

Just for the fun of it, try playing those notes on a guitar with a scale nearer 27-30", and do it through a full-range bass speaker cabinet pushed by a bass amp with a lot of power (say, 1500W).

And finally, if you have EQ, cut off everything under 80Hz and give yourself a bump in the 250Hz range. You're still not hearing fundamentals, but the rhythm will start to come through a bit better.
#4
Quote by dspellman
Issue number one is that your amp likely can't reproduce that low E as a fundamental. Part of the reason is that most guitar speakers fall off quickly below 110Hz, so you're actually listening to a mathematical combination of harmonics that are just *indicating* the existence of that note. And another part of the reason is that it takes some pretty healthy power to reproduce bottom end, and the louder you run the amp, the less power it has available to play those notes in an undistorted form.

Issue number two is that you may not have a long enough guitar scale to really reproduce those notes cleanly. Think of the difference between a spinet piano and a grand piano. The much greater string length produces separation between those bottom five notes on a grand, where the five sound almost identical on a spinet.

Just for the fun of it, try playing those notes on a guitar with a scale nearer 27-30", and do it through a full-range bass speaker cabinet pushed by a bass amp with a lot of power (say, 1500W).

And finally, if you have EQ, cut off everything under 80Hz and give yourself a bump in the 250Hz range. You're still not hearing fundamentals, but the rhythm will start to come through a bit better.

Awesome, thanks for the response. That's a lot to try and consider. I'll start by cutting those frequencies on my EQ, since I don't have a super powerful bass cab available (15 watt Peavy bass combo at home, 200 watt solid state at the band space) but if the EQ doesn't cut it (puns!) then I'll give that a try.
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#5
You may need to change the arrangement ( i.e. change the bass part or the guitar part) - that is most likely the right solution. If the kick, the bass and the guitar and the vocal are all occupying the same sonic space you can run into problems that even EQ can't help.

If you need to cut through better you should also try using the bridge pickup and play octaves instead of the single notes on the A string ( if that's technically possible)
#6
Quote by reverb66
You may need to change the arrangement ( i.e. change the bass part or the guitar part) - that is most likely the right solution. If the kick, the bass and the guitar and the vocal are all occupying the same sonic space you can run into problems that even EQ can't help.

If you need to cut through better you should also try using the bridge pickup and play octaves instead of the single notes on the A string ( if that's technically possible)

Oh man now that you mention it, the vocals for that song are also in that range. Jeez back to the composing board I s'pose.
I use a Les Paul with split coils. I generally play on both pickups, with the neck pickup coil tapped and slightly quieter than my bridge pickup.
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#7
Another aspect that could play into it, not saying I'm an expert or anything, is that it could be hard to hear from a composition point of view, if your bandmates are eating up the low frequency range already then it would definitely be hard to hear, however, if your mates were to play in a different range you might be happier with the sound of your guitar. But I think this could be something for another forum all together haha.

From a technical standpoint I would agree with dspellman!
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