#1
I honestly really like this kind of things. i really dislike the super happy tone in pure pop punk songs, so I'm willing to spice it with some darker minor chords and riffs as such. kind of like in the older blink albums. so basically im asking how to incorporate minor shapes and chords into poppy lyrics, and also what are some common minor keys that would fit? Thanks in advance
I'm a dirty fuckin' punk / i sell myself for a beer
#2
Unless you have perfect pitch, the key shouldn't matter. D minor key sounds the same as A minor key or any other minor key. So it doesn't really matter in which minor key you write your song in (and it can also be transposed to another key).

How to write in a minor key? I don't know, just come up with melodies and riffs in a minor key. You just need to make sure that your tonic chord (the chord that sounds like home) is a minor chord. I don't really know pop punk that well but I'm pretty sure there are plenty of minor key pop punk songs, just like there are plenty of minor key songs in any genre.

Listen to other bands and their minor key songs to get inspiration.
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#3
ahh, alright man, that makes sense. Thank you very much!
I'm a dirty fuckin' punk / i sell myself for a beer
#4
Quote by Strobber
I honestly really like this kind of things. i really dislike the super happy tone in pure pop punk songs, so I'm willing to spice it with some darker minor chords and riffs as such. kind of like in the older blink albums. so basically im asking how to incorporate minor shapes and chords into poppy lyrics, and also what are some common minor keys that would fit? Thanks in advance
Well, the reason "punk" sounds "poppy", is because that's what it's intended to be, pop or seminal rock music played poorly by semi-skilled musicians.... (Don't shoot the messenger).

FWIW, and if it will help you sort out "what key to write in", "All along the Watchtower", by Bob Dylan, is in a minor key, and has a minor key chord progression. "i, VI, VII".

That being "i" the tonic minor chord, the "VI" 6th of the scale major chord, and the VII 7th degree of the scale major chord. The song always returns to the tonic "i", and is therefore in a minor key.

But, I've seen the song written and performed in keys from A minor to E minor.

The chords in A minor, Am, F, G. The chords in E minor, Em, C, D.

The reason for this is, to accommodate the singers range. The same melody will always have the same "intervals" (note spaces going up or down in pitch ), but will need start higher or lower and end higher or lower, based on the singer's ability to sing them.

Using "Watchtower" as an example, Written in Am, the melody suits a baritone. Written in E minor it would be for a tenor or low alto female.

Accordingly, you can decide on a fixed pitched chord progression but where the melody line fits into it, is going to be the issue as to whether or not you, or someone else you choose, is going to be able to sing it.

And if you really want minor keys in super abundance though, might I suggest you start listening to symphonic metal....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 8, 2016,