#1
I play the guitar for 4-5 years, but I have never truly practiced, I was just always trying to play everything as fast as it is possible. Last 7 months I started to practice with metronome, very slowly and gradually speeding up. My maximum speed is 145 bpm and for last 3 months I cant get over that... and i was just thinking about, what if Im not able to play fast, or can everyone play fast ? just like 200 bpm and more?
#2
In them 4 to 5 year I bet you created tons of bad habits, it will take double the work now.
7 months is nothing it takes maybe 4 years of hard practice to get better. Also at 145 BPM do you mean eighth notes, triplets, 16th notes etc?
I believe anyone can play fast if they really want to. But once you can you probably will hate it
I recommend Pebber Browns videos on YouTube. Check out module 1 daily practice part 1 and practice it for a couple of months.

But remember don't just practice speed or you will be digging yourself a grave. Practice
Chords,songs,theory,riffs, etc
🍗🎹🎶🎼🎧🎤🎮👾🎸🎨🎷⚽️🎱🏁🎺🎻🍮🍰🍪📱👻🐔🐣🐥🐤🐽🐷💀👽💩💸🚽👻
Last edited by Guitar137335 at Apr 8, 2016,
#3
The chances are that as you set the metronome of 145 bpm, you're already in the mindset "this is hard ... I can't get faster", and you've lost the battle already, because youre body will be tensing up in reaction.

Speed really is about mental state, and ability to stay relaxed while playing.

When playing really slow, you must concentrate very hard on what your body is doing (noticing any tension anywhere). When you take a finger off the string, tell yourself to relax that finger, rather than thinking you must pull the finger off, or lift it up. Do this for a good 30 minutes at least, while practising a few patterns. This is all about burning in new pathways in your brain for coordination and fine control.

Work on your fretting hand and picking hand separately.

When picking, concentrate on minimal motion. Look for videos of economy picking, and/or thumb muting.
#4
I learned how to play fast by simply practicing scales. It's pretty boring at first, but I was able to get past the initial blandness of scales by actually studying a little bit of music theory and mapping out the scales myself. Also something that might help if you don't want to do scales is try doing some hand synchronization exercises. The guy who does the "This is why you suck at guitar" video series has a video on how to synchronize your hands that really helped me. :-)
#5
Quote by jerrykramskoy
The chances are that as you set the metronome of 145 bpm, you're already in the mindset "this is hard ... I can't get faster", and you've lost the battle already, because youre body will be tensing up in reaction.

Speed really is about mental state, and ability to stay relaxed while playing.

When playing really slow, you must concentrate very hard on what your body is doing (noticing any tension anywhere). When you take a finger off the string, tell yourself to relax that finger, rather than thinking you must pull the finger off, or lift it up. Do this for a good 30 minutes at least, while practising a few patterns. This is all about burning in new pathways in your brain for coordination and fine control.


this is what helped me progress the most. to further the idea: when you do alternate picking, tell yourself that every gap in between the striking of the notes is a time to relax, and to start "fresh" with the next note. picking is not a strenuous task - if you're getting tired from playing long strings of notes, you need to slow it down and reevaluate the way you pick.

for example, my problem was that my arm was tensed up because i felt that i needed to keep my picking hand in place while it was flailing away on the strings during fast runs. it took some time to realize that this wasn't necessary at all.
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#7
BPM and speed aren't necessarily the same thing. 140 BPM is pretty average for house music but fast for reggae. 170 is much faster than house but not particularly fast for death metal. 240 is a fairly standard high tempo for many technical death metal bands but common enough in jazz and a fairly moderate tempo for bluegrass. 350 is common for fast bluegrass songs but not anywhere near the tempo of many speedcore songs.

So you can't really say that a given tempo, like 200, is fast without defining the techniques being used and the note durations. 8th notes at 90 would not be considered fast. Playing 8th notes at 240 may or may not be fast depending on the instrument, techniques, and genre. I personally would consider a bluegrass song played at 240 to be uncomfortably slow to play.

That aside, everyone can learn to play fast. It's a matter of practice. You gotta try to push yourself to play faster than you can, but not so fast that you strain yourself. Just don't push yourself too hard. Like you actually have to try to push yourself past 145 or you won't get any faster. Next time try setting the metronome to like 170 and try playing.

The standard approach to learning speed is to learn to play accurately and then build speed. There's an alternative though, and that is to learn to play as fast as you can and then build accuracy, ie play as fast as you can but very messy and gradually clean up your technique. That's how Shawn Lane learned to play.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#8
yeah, what note values are you talking about at 145? If you're doing sextuplets at 145, I'd say you're playing plenty fast already.

And like JerryK said, it's not about speed itself. Speed is only possible with control. Most of the hard work is actually getting the technique good at a lower tempo. Once you have good technique, you can turn up the tempo quite a bit and it really isn't any harder to play.

Without knowing any more about your technique, practice habits, or goals, I'd say to just focus on getting the best technique you can at slow tempos and then start to work in some faster exercises and repertoire.

Remember to do slow stuff every day, too. Technique is only technique if you can use it all the time. If you can play fast but not slow, it's because you are using poor technique to achieve speed and it stops sounding good as soon as the individual notes become more audible at slower tempos.
#9
Learn to play slow, with feeling , control and timing.
Then learn to play faster, with feeling control and timing!

If I get difficult bits with speed, I find that I can generally sort it out by analysing how I am using my fingers and changing something to make it more efficient, if u know what I mean?

E.g. Sometimes it might be most natural to use the 4th finger for a note, but the note u play after that might mean that it's better to stretch and hit it with the 3rd, so that u ve still got the 4th one left, u get me?
#10
Maybe it is time to get a professional teacher to take a look at your technique and help you over the hurdle.
Look up the Rock Discipline (Petrucci) video - that might help too if you want to speed up.

BTW - Divid Gilmour has the exact problem you cite and look where that got him!
#11
I recently joined a thrash band - a kind of music I had never played before. At first it was truly intimidating how fast the music was and how intricate the riffs felt.

I used Guitar Pro (I'm old) and started off learning sections at half speed. Then at 3/4 speed. And then finally playing along with the record, but I did a few things first:

I warmed up (by playing some scales)
I loosened up (literally shook out my arms, stretched my fingers and did a little bit of relaxed strumming
If I couldn't get a certain speed I would just go back down a speed, take my time. If a piece was frustrating me I'd leave it - you're building up muscle memory and it's amazing what a little bit of time for your brain to process what it's been learning can make.

Like Jerry said, a huge amount is mindset. Relax, enjoy it and work towards your goal.
|
'....even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked...."

Do me a favour, pop into Songwriting & Lyrics and add a comment to one thread, any thread, but contribute.

----

www.soundcloud.com/christobaldo
#12
Looked up Rock Discipline, Petrucci came up with some really great exercises and it's fun as hell to watch him play. Thanks for the tip!
#13
Duuude))) Have you seen Anton Oparin? He's monster in speed! Look at his video where he plays get out of my yard without human capo! damn!!!!!! That guy will be your personal coach for a MONTH!! for 200 dollars. Find his lessons and write him a message. His skype lessons are so expensive, about 150 dollars if you take just one, but you can choose "Advanced guitar methodology" It costs only 200 but for this he will tell you everything he knows about guitar playing, all his methods, workouts, exercises, stamina workouts, speed workouts, alternate picking, how he practiced, what he did, why, how, how much time, all his schedule... It's INCREDIBLE!! he worked with pro sportsmen on training muscles for guitarists, duuude, find him... I felt awesome in 3 months of work with him! He's incredible! 200 dollars is free for him!