#1
I have like a mental barrier when I play fast licks. I seem not to be able to tell if I have played all the notes correctly as I am playing. So I mentally go back over what I just played, then I tense up and lose it. Has anyone else had this problem and overcame it?
#2
Maybe you need to slow down, and also try to relax.

Can you record yourself when playing? That helps me detect the flaws in my playing quite a lot, and then I try to correct them. Flaws that I probably wouldn't have noticed if I didn't listened to the stuff I record.

It may help you since you've mentioned you're not able to tell if you played everything correctly or not.
#3
Quote by DanyFS
Maybe you need to slow down, and also try to relax.

Can you record yourself when playing? That helps me detect the flaws in my playing quite a lot, and then I try to correct them. Flaws that I probably wouldn't have noticed if I didn't listened to the stuff I record.

It may help you since you've mentioned you're not able to tell if you played everything correctly or not.


I feel like it's self sabotage.

I have tried slowing down. Spent months on some licks, but don't seem to get any faster. I see people playing faster after only a few years. Some stuff I have been working on, on and off for 5 yrs. Been playing for 20 yrs. Maybe some people just can't do it... Whether it is due to self sabotage or physical limits
#4
Quote by wiggedy
I feel like it's self sabotage.

I have tried slowing down. Spent months on some licks, but don't seem to get any faster. I see people playing faster after only a few years. Some stuff I have been working on, on and off for 5 yrs. Been playing for 20 yrs. Maybe some people just can't do it... Whether it is due to self sabotage or physical limits


Are you self taught? Maybe you have developed bad habits for example.

I'm not saying you need a teacher, but self taught players usually develop bad habits, and it can be hard to overcome them. However it is totally possible to overcome them. Just takes some work.

You mentioned that you spent months on some licks, but can't become any faster. Are you saying that you can't play some licks at full speed? Are you stuck at a certain BPM and can't get past it?

I found that I started improving a lot after recording myself practicing scales, songs, etc. I discovered flaws in my playing that I had no idea they were there. And some of them were happening due to bad habits that I developed.

You should try it. Maybe you'll find out what you're doing wrong and you'll be able to correct whatever it is.

Also, what do you exactly mean by self sabotage?
Last edited by DanyFS at Apr 10, 2016,
#5
Quote by DanyFS
Are you self taught? Maybe you have developed bad habits for example.

I'm not saying you need a teacher, but self taught players usually develop bad habits, and it can be hard to overcome them. However it is totally possible to overcome them. Just takes some work.

You mentioned that you spent months on some licks, but can't become any faster. Are you saying that you can't play some licks at full speed? Are you stuck at a certain BPM and can't get past it?

I found that I started improving a lot after recording myself practicing scales, songs, etc. I discovered flaws in my playing that I had no idea they were there. And some of them were happening due to bad habits that I developed.

You should try it. Maybe you'll find out what you're doing wrong and you'll be able to correct whatever it is.

Also, what do you exactly mean by self sabotage?


Not sure how to explain it, like I said it's a mental or sub conscience thing... a kind of Self Doubt sort of thing. I do record myself to get my phrasing down, but for speed.... doesn't seem to help. I ave done the 21 day challenge thing.. that helped and on a good day I can almost get it up to speed.. then the doubt comes back.
#7
Quote by wiggedy
Not sure how to explain it, like I said it's a mental or sub conscience thing... a kind of Self Doubt sort of thing. I do record myself to get my phrasing down, but for speed.... doesn't seem to help. I ave done the 21 day challenge thing.. that helped and on a good day I can almost get it up to speed.. then the doubt comes back.


You've answered your own question ... self doubt is pernicious.

Thing is, who are you currently playing this music to? Yourself, family, friends aren't going to care less if you make a mistake ... so no pressure there. Strangers? Well, they are ... strangers ... so why worry? Have fun, enjoy yourself. Be aware of your weaknesses. They are opportunities to improve. They are not opportunities to tear yourself up!

I guarantee that it's muscle tension from your own doubt that's giving you grief. So, the opportunity is to examine each muscle involved while playing, very slowly, checking how relaxed it is, and consciously relaxing it when you detect it. And repeat, and repeat (may take quite awhile ... hours to weeks) until you don't detect it. Check you jaw. Check you breathing.

Couple of useful things simple to try:

1/ fret any note, squeezing hard as you can to hold the string down. Play it. Gradually release the squeeze, playing all the time. Keep going, till the note chokes. Then put just enough pressure back on to hear it cleanly. You'll be amazed how little pressure is required.

2/ Fretting hand: try just having one finger on a string at any time (lead playing). When you change fingers, tell yourself to consciusly relax the original finger. Again, check tension.

Picking hand: that's another source of grief! Another message!

Our brains act like idiots at times, and we have to be aware of that and counteract as best we can.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Apr 11, 2016,
#8
yes, slow down and make sure you're learning and playing everything right. You will stop doubting your technique when you have technique that's beyond doubt.

And when you're learning tunes or jamming, don't spend much time on the edge of your competency. Once you find the boundaries of your technique, try to stay within them while you're making music. Actual practice is when you should be pushing your boundaries. Your hands will learn and remember what you play, whether or not it's any good. That means if you spend a lot of time playing sloppily beyond your technical abilities, those sloppy licks are what will come out later when you improvise. You want your "bag of tricks" to contain only stuff that you can play well.
Last edited by cdgraves at Apr 11, 2016,
#9
Quote by cdgraves
yes, slow down and make sure you're learning and playing everything right. You will stop doubting your technique when you have technique that's beyond doubt.

And when you're learning tunes or jamming, don't spend much time on the edge of your competency. Once you find the boundaries of your technique, try to stay within them while you're making music. Actual practice is when you should be pushing your boundaries. Your hands will learn and remember what you play, whether or not it's any good. That means if you spend a lot of time playing sloppily beyond your technical abilities, those sloppy licks are what will come out later when you improvise. You want your "bag of tricks" to contain only stuff that you can play well.


Good advice.