#1
I have a 2013 Std Epi that I bought new at the time. I has always had buzzing issues up high on the neck, especially with the high 2 strings, plus the low E has buzzing and a kind of boing sound from the 14 up frets.

I took it to a guitar shop and they tried to fix it, but the action was super high and the high strings still had a bit of buzz. I've been trying different combos of neck relief and bridge height, tried heavier gauge strings..nothing.

The guitar just feels terrible to play any way I seem to set it up. Is there any last-ditch save for it?

Thank you
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#2
Should have played it before buying it. And then bought something else. Epiphones aren't exactly known for quality control, and there's plenty of other brands that blow them away at the same price points.
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#3
Haha yea hindsight is 20/20. It's not my favorite guitar but now that I have it, the resell value is so low that I might as well use it as the one to loan to friends or use in situations where damage is possible. LPs are tanks anyways.

So..any advice on fixing it?
We're just a battery for hire with the guitar fire
Ready and aimed at you
Pick up your balls and load up your cannon
For a twenty one gun salute
For those about to rock, FIRE!
We salute you
#4
Perhaps you need the frets leveled.
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#5
Quote by 21GunSalute
I have a 2013 Std Epi that I bought new at the time. I has always had buzzing issues up high on the neck, especially with the high 2 strings, plus the low E has buzzing and a kind of boing sound from the 14 up frets.


It's likely you need the frets leveled. You may have a "Gibson Hump" and/or a badly cut nut. And you definitely have an incompetent local guitar shop tech. And you should learn enough about guitars to recognize a new guitar that needs help when you buy it.

I've budgeted a Really Good Initial Setup into the cost of any guitar new to me. That will usually include a fret superglue and (if required) fret leveling, even a PLEK job.
#6
Quote by the_bi99man
Should have played it before buying it. And then bought something else. Epiphones aren't exactly known for quality control, and there's plenty of other brands that blow them away at the same price points.


Epiphones are usually just fine coming out of the factory and their quality control isn't all that bad; there's no point in "brand bashing" them. But after they've been on some guitar denter wall for six months, all bets are off. I bought an Axcess Custom (north of $4K) direct from Gibson's Custom Shop and received it at the same time as an Agile LP. Because I play with pretty low action, flaws in fret level really make a difference. Both guitars needed work (the Gibson was actually worse, with a noticeable Gibson Hump) and both were PLEK'd and both have remained great players since then.

Most of the guitars I've purchased recently have come from online sources; there are just too few options at the local guitar stores. Many were used. "Should have played it before buying it" wasn't an option. But since I know that virtually any guitar can be made to play well by the right tech with the right tools, it's never been a problem, either.
#7
bought my epi lp std last year and other than the truss rod being a little on the tight side it played great ! resonated fine.. was a bit dark tone wise but heck i paid 500 cad (sale item)
27mMoV31II7.a2
#8
I agree with the comments above, sounds like you have a high fret or two and need a level done.

If the tech's solution to this problem was to give you really high action you definitely need to find another tech.
#9
Speaking of cool techs I had the fender repair one in my area tell me to use 12s for a nut buzz cuz he didn't want to send me a new one for buying my American deluxe.
27mMoV31II7.a2
#10
I have four Epi Les Paul guitars (Standard, Custom (both Korean made), an Ultra II and a 1960 Tribute (China). I haven't had any issue with any of them (I do my own work) and I agree that your tech wasn't very good and you probably just need a good fret leveling that he should have done. Like dspellman I like low action on my Les Paul's and I have it on all four. No buzzing, no problems. It's possible that you could have a "factory lemon" (it happens) but I doubt it. Just find a better tech.

As far as "factory lemons" go, I bought a brand new Les Paul in 1972 that I only owned for about 8 months. The neck was horrible and I didn't play well enough to know what was wrong. My tech at the time (a really good one) told me it was bad neck right out of the Gibson factory and encouraged me to sell it asap. I traded it in at the store I bought it at originally for another Les Paul. It happens.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Apr 15, 2016,
#11
If the nut height is high then it's harder to get decent action, especially in the higher frets because you have to lower it (Bridge) much more than necessary to make up of for the resulting higher action from the nut height in the 1-12th fret region and this had the effect of making the string too low in the higher regions. Perfect fret height is a lot more crucial when you want super low action and not as necessary at the LPs 4/64ths standard expected height (@ 12th fret).
Moving on.....
#12
Thanks for the advice. After fiddling with it more today and getting nowhere, I took it to a shop and sold it (for cheap..). It's kind of a de-inspiration to play
We're just a battery for hire with the guitar fire
Ready and aimed at you
Pick up your balls and load up your cannon
For a twenty one gun salute
For those about to rock, FIRE!
We salute you
#13
Quote by 21GunSalute
Thanks for the advice. After fiddling with it more today and getting nowhere, I took it to a shop and sold it (for cheap..). It's kind of a de-inspiration to play


Two things:

Almost any guitar can be made to play really well. "Fiddling with it" doesn't inspire much confidence in your ability to keep and maintain a guitar.

Rather than lose money on the guitar (as you've obviously done), it might have been more useful to have gotten the guitar a proper setup (you now know where not to take it).
#14
Yea I admit I suck at guitar repair. Unfortunately I live in nowhereland, Japan, where there are no decent guitar repair shops. I actually hated the LP neck's bulk and lack of easy fret access up high, so even if I had it fixed, I'd just be spending more on a guitar that would be a "beater" guitar. I did lose money overall, but considering I bought it outlet mainly as a test to see if LPs would work for me (guess not) I figure 2 years of use I had for about the sub-$200 USD I lost on buy vs sell, it's not such a hard lesson learned. If I really loved the guitar, I would ship it to Tokyo and get it set up, but for an Epiphone it's really not worth it.
We're just a battery for hire with the guitar fire
Ready and aimed at you
Pick up your balls and load up your cannon
For a twenty one gun salute
For those about to rock, FIRE!
We salute you
#16
Quote by 21GunSalute
Yea I admit I suck at guitar repair. Unfortunately I live in nowhereland, Japan, where there are no decent guitar repair shops. I actually hated the LP neck's bulk and lack of easy fret access up high, so even if I had it fixed, I'd just be spending more on a guitar that would be a "beater" guitar. I did lose money overall, but considering I bought it outlet mainly as a test to see if LPs would work for me (guess not) I figure 2 years of use I had for about the sub-$200 USD I lost on buy vs sell, it's not such a hard lesson learned. If I really loved the guitar, I would ship it to Tokyo and get it set up, but for an Epiphone it's really not worth it.


Not really sure what "lesson" was learned from the situation you're describing. Even the most expensive guitar will eventually need a proper setup and fret dressing. If the lesson is to sell your guitar every time it needs routine maintenance, you're probably better off stick with the "beater" guitars to minimize your losses.
#17
Quote by 21GunSalute
Yea I admit I suck at guitar repair. Unfortunately I live in nowhereland, Japan, where there are no decent guitar repair shops. I actually hated the LP neck's bulk and lack of easy fret access up high, so even if I had it fixed, I'd just be spending more on a guitar that would be a "beater" guitar.


Most LP style guitars suffer from two things where upper fret access is concerned. One is the clunky neck heel (the LP neck meets the body at around the 16th fret) with the 90 degree body point that nails your palm when you slide up high. The other is the cutaway, which is a bit too narrow for easy access if you have large hands. And then, of course, they're 22 fret guitars.

I have Floyd Rose trems on the LPs I use most. While that, in itself, doesn't make things better, Gibson *has* produced the Axcess, which has a thinner body and a carved neck heel, both of which produce a MUCH more comfortable access to the upper frets. It's also got a tummy cut, which makes it more comfortable to play:



Unfortunately, these things start around $3K, and my Custom was $4K. And you still have the issue with the cutaway horn and the 22-fret neck.

Surprisingly, one of the LEAST expensive guitars I own is one of the best in that regard. I have an Agile AL 2000 Floyd (full thickness, solid body LP) that has a 24-fret neck with the 24th fret where the 22nd fret would normally be on a standard LP, has a "stubby" cutaway horn which allows better access for big paws, and has a "tilted" neck/body connection that works, in practice, as well as the Axcess neck heel! Upper fret nirvana coupled with LP noises.



This guitar was a B stock (finish issues) that cost me under $200, with case, shipped (about 50% off). When I got it, it was very well set up, but it fretted out on 2-stop bends at the 16th fret, so I handed it to Gary Brawer in SF for a fret superglue and PLEK that cost nearly as much as the guitar. Absolutely worth it, however; it's an amazing player and has been earning its keep as one of my two bar guitars for several years.

If you're going to play guitar, you need to know how to maintain it, and you need to understand what it's doing when it's not playing as well as you like. The best $15-20 (at Amazon) you can spend on your guitar is the purchase of this book:



Go through it BEFORE you buy your next guitar.