#1
As the title says, I'm thinking of getting back into guitar after a five year lay off. I played for a few years and became frustrated that I could never quite get a firm mental grasp on the musical theory required to be able to play like Michael Romeo and Yngwie. Just wanted to put it out there and ask if anyone knew great resources for music theory and how to start all over again? I learn how to play the major modes, pentatonic scale and some harmonic minor/melodic minor but couldn't progress beyond that. I had a couple teachers but they didn't really help too much. I figure I'll be much better off studying at my own pace by myself. Never got a good grasp of chords either, or how to make them.

I just need to overcome frustration with my own progress and get some good sources for proper musical theory, maybe someone could give me some advice on where to start and how to study the theoretical side of music. And of course I'll have to buy a new guitar as I sold my old one haha. I'm considering a cheap LTD that looks quite nice.
#2
Quote by AmadeoQuattro
I figure I'll be much better off studying at my own pace by myself. Never got a good grasp of chords either, or how to make them.


I'm not sure about that, a teacher would definitely help. You just need to find a good one.

As for theory and sites and such there are a ton of free stuff online. Musictheory.net is one that is often recommended. I'm sure others can recommend more.

You can also just type "basisc music theory lesson" on youtube and you'll probably find a lot of good videos.

If you need a place to start, I'd say you need to learn the names of the notes and figure out where they are on the fretboard. You should look into intervals and how to build them, since intervals are used to build scales and chords. After you have a basic grasp on what chord and scale building is all about, you should familiarize yourself with the concept of a "key". You really need to know what a key is and what it means. Pro tip: don't learn anything about modes. They do you no good just yet.

It also doesn't hurt to learn the basics of rhythm; you should know what a quarter note, or an eighth note, or a triplet is, and you'll need to know what a time signature is.

These are kind of the bare bones basics you need to know to understand how music works. It goes way deeper than this, of course, but learning stuff like this will help you understand how guys like Romeo and Yngwie build their riffs and solos.

However, a better way to understand what they do is to learn a lot of their songs. This is what you mostly should be doing tbh.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#3
Quote by AmadeoQuattro
As the title says, I'm thinking of getting back into guitar after a five year lay off. I played for a few years and became frustrated that I could never quite get a firm mental grasp on the musical theory required to be able to play like Michael Romeo and Yngwie. Just wanted to put it out there and ask if anyone knew great resources for music theory and how to start all over again? I learn how to play the major modes, pentatonic scale and some harmonic minor/melodic minor but couldn't progress beyond that. I had a couple teachers but they didn't really help too much. I figure I'll be much better off studying at my own pace by myself. Never got a good grasp of chords either, or how to make them.

I just need to overcome frustration with my own progress and get some good sources for proper musical theory, maybe someone could give me some advice on where to start and how to study the theoretical side of music. And of course I'll have to buy a new guitar as I sold my old one haha. I'm considering a cheap LTD that looks quite nice.


I'm not sure where you have picked up the connection that you need music theory to "play like"?

Don't get me wrong, I teach and am a big proponent of Music theory and understanding the guitar and all of that. But I don't make the connection that you are making.

Yngwie uses primarily one scale. Are you sure you are talking "theory" here or are you meaning "technique"?

What resources do you have available, that you bring to the table? Can you afford lessons?

Best,

Sean
#4
Quote by Kevätuhri
I'm not sure about that, a teacher would definitely help. You just need to find a good one.

As for theory and sites and such there are a ton of free stuff online. Musictheory.net is one that is often recommended. I'm sure others can recommend more.

You can also just type "basisc music theory lesson" on youtube and you'll probably find a lot of good videos.

If you need a place to start, I'd say you need to learn the names of the notes and figure out where they are on the fretboard. You should look into intervals and how to build them, since intervals are used to build scales and chords. After you have a basic grasp on what chord and scale building is all about, you should familiarize yourself with the concept of a "key". You really need to know what a key is and what it means. Pro tip: don't learn anything about modes. They do you no good just yet.

It also doesn't hurt to learn the basics of rhythm; you should know what a quarter note, or an eighth note, or a triplet is, and you'll need to know what a time signature is.

These are kind of the bare bones basics you need to know to understand how music works. It goes way deeper than this, of course, but learning stuff like this will help you understand how guys like Romeo and Yngwie build their riffs and solos.

However, a better way to understand what they do is to learn a lot of their songs. This is what you mostly should be doing tbh.


Thanks for the advice mate, I'll definitely check that site out and learn as much as I can from it. I certainly agree with your points about rhythm and keys and whatnot, those will be the first things I study up on to get back into it. And if you know of any similar website feel free to let me know as I'll definitely use them.

Quote by Sean0913
I'm not sure where you have picked up the connection that you need music theory to "play like"?

Don't get me wrong, I teach and am a big proponent of Music theory and understanding the guitar and all of that. But I don't make the connection that you are making.

Yngwie uses primarily one scale. Are you sure you are talking "theory" here or are you meaning "technique"?

What resources do you have available, that you bring to the table? Can you afford lessons?

Best,

Sean


What I was trying to say is I don't understand how he does what he does, and how he creates all of those harmonic minor and diminished arpeggios, or the actual modes and scales he uses. I know a few patterns such as phrygian and so forth but I don't really understand what is happening like he does, so I'd like to increase my knowledge to be better like that. It's hard to explain but I became frustrated that I wasn't progressing and getting a better understanding of these things.

Well as far as resources go I have money for books and internet for websites, and I probably could afford lessons but I think for now I'd prefer self study and taking up a teacher later down the road. I just never really clicked with any of my teachers so at the moment I can't really be bothered with them. But I do have a couple of friends to jam with so that is going to be exciting starting up again.
#5
Quote by AmadeoQuattro

What I was trying to say is I don't understand how he does what he does, and how he creates all of those harmonic minor and diminished arpeggios, or the actual modes and scales he uses. I know a few patterns such as phrygian and so forth but I don't really understand what is happening like he does, so I'd like to increase my knowledge to be better like that. It's hard to explain but I became frustrated that I wasn't progressing and getting a better understanding of these things.

Well as far as resources go I have money for books and internet for websites, and I probably could afford lessons but I think for now I'd prefer self study and taking up a teacher later down the road. I just never really clicked with any of my teachers so at the moment I can't really be bothered with them. But I do have a couple of friends to jam with so that is going to be exciting starting up again.



I understand better now! Just checking. And I agree, theory helps explain what someone's doing. I use it all the time in that regard!

It sounds like you have a clear course charted for you, now! Good luck on your journey. If I can ever be of help, let me know!

And by the way if you take any Minor 7th arpeggio, and substitute the b7 with a major 7, you'll have a harmonic minor sounding arp!

So an A Harmonic Minor-ish arp would be A C E G#

What it really is, is a Minor Major 7 arpeggio outline

To continue that, you could play the V7 of Am, and play E G# B and D for an E7 arpeggio.

Have fun, my friend! Sounds like you're all sorted!

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Apr 13, 2016,