#1
I've been playing every day since Christmas. What are some practice tips that every new player should work on? I typically spend 10 minutes on switching back and forth on open chords. Then I'll practice bouncing back and forth between barre chords and open chords. Any advice would be great. Thanks....
#2
It depends on you and what you want to do. There are many levels of what you should practice. The big picture, to get to where you want to go, then some sort of general knowledge, things you need to know to get there, and then things to practice to get those down, and then break that into chunks, in order ta practice the specifics to get those things down, and then even smaller chunks after that.

There are better orders than others, and better ways of practicing than others. Going back and forth on open chords like your doing is good for learning open chords, and probably good for your level, and that can be broken down into separate smaller parts as well.

If I was your teacher, that's what I would do, plan out the whole journey, and break it down into the best parts for you, and where you are going, so that you can learn in the fastest most efficient way for your skill sets, and where you want to take guitar playing.

Other than that, there are many different answers, a lot of people at a lot of different levels, and with lots of different skill sets, will say lots different things, and some are better for you than others. You will basically be on your own, choosing what you think is best, and you won't be able to determine whether or not you made the best choices, until you've gotten far enough along where you possess enough information and understanding about guitar playing, to be a good teacher, yourself.

But what you're doing is good, you need to do that, basically no matter what sort of guitarist you want to be, and of course, learn songs.
#3
Thanks for the lengthy response. If I had to say what my goals are, they would be to be good enough to play with others, and eventually be good enough to play out with others. Thanks again...
#4
If you're already playing barre chords, I think you can start some scales. You don't need to learn a lot of scales at first, just the most important - major, minor and their pentatonics. Learn them in one position for now, and make sure you know them well. You'll find them handy when you start improvising with others.

I would also suggest you get the basics of music theory. It will help you understand what you're doing, how it all works.

Also start learning songs - start from beginner stuff and increase technical difficulty as you go along. (It's also more fun practicing chords in songs than by themselves)

Every now and then, record yourself. It will help you monitor your progress and identify your strengths and weaknesses.

Hope this helps.
#5
Since music is about sounds, start training your ear ASAP.

Learn to sing the first 5 notes of the major scale (whatever key is comfy for you), out aloud, and in your head.

The pattern for this on guitar, along ONE string (any string) is:

choose some (any) fret. up 2 frets. up 2 frets. up 1 fret. up 2 frets.

fret 0 is the open string. So, say we want E major using the bass string (6th string), using the above pattern, you get frets 0, 2, 4, 5, 7 for playing the first 5 notes of E major. (fret 0 on 6th string is the note E).

But you could choose anywhere, say start on the 3rd fret on the 2nd string (B string). The first 5 notes of the major scale now would be at frets 3, 5, 7, 8, 10. (Because the 3rd fret is D, this is the first 5 notes of D major).

Experiment till you find somewhere that you can comfortably sing all the 5 notes.

Once you've found this comfy area, then try singing them (1,2,3,4,5. 1,3,5. 1,2,3. 3,2,1. 1,2,3,2,4,3. Etc.) Muck around with the rhythm to move this from an exercise to a melody with feel.

Especially learn to distinguish the 2nd and 3rd notes of the scale, and perceive how far "above" the first note of they scale they are. Drill yourself by just randomly singing some note (that's comfy), and then treat that as the first note of the major scale. Then think, sing 1, sing 3, sing 1, sing 2 etc. and mostly end on one 1.

Reason is that is close to the beginnings of real-life melody. Or try, with the 1 in your mind, start on 3, then come back down to 1 (3,2,1 for example).

Make up little melodies (away from guitar). Think of simple tunes (nursery rhymes, national anthems, folk ...) and as much as possible try and listen for these 5 notes of the major scale.

The ear is amazing ... far more capability than the eye ... and it can develop quickly, with a few minutes practice a day.

Don't lose sight of melody, ever.

As you learn songs, see how (if) they relate to the above. Later, if you learn some theory (very shrewd idea to do this), you'll start seeing hpw the chords complement the melody (or vice versa).
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Apr 16, 2016,
#7
What kind of music do you listen to? What kind of music do you want to play? Do you want to be primarily a lead player or a rhythm player? Knowing this will help us point you in the right direction. The music of Brad Paisley and Dave Mustaine are worlds apart, after all.

In the mean time, as others have said, you might want to start looking at a couple of simple songs. I personally recommend "Hurt" by Johnny Cash. It's pretty easy. The same repeating pattern and only four or five chords.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#8
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Last edited by sunhunchan1 at Apr 18, 2016,
#10
Quote by Junior#1
What kind of music do you listen to? What kind of music do you want to play? Do you want to be primarily a lead player or a rhythm player? Knowing this will help us point you in the right direction. The music of Brad Paisley and Dave Mustaine are worlds apart, after all.

In the mean time, as others have said, you might want to start looking at a couple of simple songs. I personally recommend "Hurt" by Johnny Cash. It's pretty easy. The same repeating pattern and only four or five chords.

I like everything from green day to aerosmith, pretty anything other than country or hard metal music...