#1
Hello. Before dunlop i was using Elixir on my Fender Strat. But i wanted try new string set. I'm using for a month and i saw some corrosion on strings. And today i saw keyboard has some scratches. Is it about strings and how can i repair keyboard? And one more question. I cleaned my keyboard with wet microfiber cleaning cloth. Is it dangerous for keyboard? Thanks
#2
The translator you're using is not very good. :p

What you're referring to is called a fingerboard or a fretboard. A keyboard is one of these;



You can try smoothing out the scratches with some very fine sandpaper, something like 1000 grit, or use some #0000 steel wool (which isn't as recommended because its messy and the wool's shavings get into your pickups very easily)

But if you're getting noticeable scratches in your fingerboard after playing then you're probably fretting the guitar far too hard or you're digging your fingernails into it, both of which are bad habits.

Fingerboards will naturally wear as you play over a very extensive period of time though.
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#3
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The translator you're using is not very good. :p

What you're referring to is called a fingerboard or a fretboard. A keyboard is one of these;



You can try smoothing out the scratches with some very fine sandpaper, something like 1000 grit, or use some #0000 steel wool (which isn't as recommended because its messy and the wool's shavings get into your pickups very easily)

But if you're getting noticeable scratches in your fingerboard after playing then you're probably fretting the guitar far too hard or you're digging your fingernails into it, both of which are bad habits.

Fingerboards will naturally wear as you play over a very extensive period of time though.


thanks for your answer. But i didn't use translator in Turkey we called that keyboard
Last edited by omerekeryilmaz at Apr 14, 2016,
#4
It is not a good idea to use a wet microfibre cloth on the rosewood fingerboard - water and wood are not friends!
Buy some"lemon oil" - it is about £5 (Jim Dunlop or Planet Waves lemon oil) and use sparingly ( very small amount) and remove any residue. It will not remove scratches but will help keep the fingerboard in good condition. I use a cotton bud (plastic with a small ball of cotton at each end) to apply the oil and then a DRY microfibre cloth to remove excess.

I wouldn't worry about the scratches in the fingerboard unless they were deep.

Just a thought - These are scratches and not the natural wood fibres that you are seeing?
Last edited by monabri at Apr 16, 2016,
#5
As long as it isn't dripping wet, water(especially distilled) is fine for cleaning the fretboard.
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#6
Quote by monabri

Buy some"lemon oil" - it is about £5 (Jim Dunlop or Planet Waves lemon oil) and use sparingly ( very small amount) and remove any residue.


Good stuff. But yeah, OP, if you get some of this, use VERY SPARINGLY. You really don't need much. Almost every time I see someone use it, they're using far more than they need. Also, to avoid confusion, definitely go to a music store and get the stuff from Dunlop or Planet Waves, or some other music brand. If you go to a general store to get "lemon oil", you're liable to get actual lemon oil, which you do NOT WANT to put on your fingerboard.
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#7
Some wear and tear on the fretboard is quite normal, and the extent of it depends on your playing style and how long you let your nails get. I wouldn't bother repairing it until it became major divots.

I clean mine (not very often!) with Dr Ducks, a fretboard oil, but very sparingly as emphasised already by others. More is definitely not better in this case. I personally don't like using abrasives like steel wool. a soft eraser is good for cleaning the gunk from the join between the fret and the board.