#1
Hello guys!
I'm not sure where to put this post, but I feel that I have to share my thoughts with other musicians.
It started when I was preparing for my bands' release, we are DIY band and not doing music for the living, but we trying to do our best. So I was looking for the instruments that will help me to bring my music to a small community of real listeners (because we play metal we don't need to be popular all over the world), and I face an interesting situation.
On the one hand, the Internet is a good place to share your music, but it is obvious that there is too much music out there. So I was trying to find a news portal or a blog that will post my bands release and it was extremely difficult. What strikes me the most - the rules for bands that what to send the album for the review. These rules are mostly unfriendly and even aggressive like "don't do this and don't do that, don't even bother to send us your music it's too much of it and so on...". So I wonder : what a metal community have become? We have a bunch of forums that post the same news about trendy bands, or bands that at least have a PR agency if you are DIY they even don't bother to read letters from you.
So it seems that in the end the Internet haven't done any good for us. We still need to have "special people" to post our news, so our listeners will now about us.
What is you view, is it easier now to reach your fans? Is there is enough attention for all bands and genres?
Last edited by polina.slavskaya at Apr 15, 2016,
#2
Quote by polina.slavskaya
What is you view, is it easier now to reach your fans? Is there is enough attention for all bands and genres?


Of course it's easier to reach your fans. However difficult it might seem now, I guarantee that it was a lot more difficult 20 years ago. It was never easy to reach an audience.

And of course there isn't enough attention. You can find hundreds of bands in a single city, and most of them suck. My home town in Finland has less than 20000 inhabitants (a really small town) and even we had like 15 active bands I knew of (a lot of which sucked) and probably 50 more that I didn't know about.

If you want to get attention, market yourself properly and play a lot of gigs. No one will do your work for you and "discover" you.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
Last edited by Kevätuhri at Apr 15, 2016,
#3
I can completely understand. It is the same for most genres I expect.

There is a hell of a lot of music out there and every band is wanting the same thing you are...publicity and exposure. They all have the same idea about how to do that - get someone to post some article or blog to reach out to a wider audience.

Not only that but the new portals / blogs often want a bigger audience and so want to be taken seriously and want to ensure that they are talking about quality music. They aren't going to post or discuss every new DIY release because 99.999% of it is derivative garbage. Not to mention that it would take them far too much time to do that. So they stick to talking about stuff that's trending within the communities and target demographic.

Your listeners know about you and you don't need people to post your news for that. They are already your listeners. What you want is someone to tell other people about you.

But you're musician's. You make music, you make noise, you have a voice. If the people that hear you think you're worth telling others about they will. If those people think you're worth telling even more people about they will. If enough people are downloading, and listening to your music you will have a following and gain traction. That's when the blogs and news posts will start picking up the scent and maybe write something about you as they try to jump on your bandwagon.

You need to develop an audience. Your music has to be what does that. THAT'S where it starts. A label won't sign you, a news site, or blogger won't write about you, nothing will happen or you until you gain a following first and foremost.

If you ran one of these blog/news sites then you can take as many DIY bands as you like. You can listen to their music, talk about the release, and offer critique of the music. Then when you receive 300 emails a day with people sending you their 7 minute terrible attempts at music thinking that it's the next big thing, we will see how long you last before you start turning people down and telling them not to send you stuff because you won't listen. We'll see how long it takes before you start introducing some qualifiers as to what music you will listen to and what you won't.

Your view of things is limited to your own existence and your own perception of being. If you start thinking about the wider picture and putting yourself into other people's shoes you might start to understand why certain marketing strategies simply won't work. You might also come up with some novel strategies that do work.
Si
#4
Just because the internet is a thing nowadays doesn't mean you should ignore building a good local following. Don't try to conquer the world until you rule your own city :-)
#5
Quote by polina.slavskaya
Hello guys!
I'm not sure where to put this post, but I feel that I have to share my thoughts with other musicians.
It started when I was preparing for my bands' release, we are DIY band and not doing music for the living, but we trying to do our best. So I was looking for the instruments that will help me to bring my music to a small community of real listeners (because we play metal we don't need to be popular all over the world), and I face an interesting situation.
On the one hand, the Internet is a good place to share your music, but it is obvious that there is too much music out there. So I was trying to find a news portal or a blog that will post my bands release and it was extremely difficult. What strikes me the most - the rules for bands that what to send the album for the review. These rules are mostly unfriendly and even aggressive like "don't do this and don't do that, don't even bother to send us your music it's too much of it and so on...". So I wonder : what a metal community have become? We have a bunch of forums that post the same news about trendy bands, or bands that at least have a PR agency if you are DIY they even don't bother to read letters from you.
So it seems that in the end the Internet haven't done any good for us. We still need to have "special people" to post our news, so our listeners will now about us.
What is you view, is it easier now to reach your fans? Is there is enough attention for all bands and genres?


If you want to get comments from like-minded people, one way is to join soundcloud.com, and then join interest groups, which you can by searching "groups" (as in interest groups) for "metal". Then share you music to these groups.
#6
Quote by 20Tigers
I can completely understand. It is the same for most genres I expect.

There is a hell of a lot of music out there and every band is wanting the same thing you are...publicity and exposure. They all have the same idea about how to do that - get someone to post some article or blog to reach out to a wider audience.

Not only that but the new portals / blogs often want a bigger audience and so want to be taken seriously and want to ensure that they are talking about quality music. They aren't going to post or discuss every new DIY release because 99.999% of it is derivative garbage. Not to mention that it would take them far too much time to do that. So they stick to talking about stuff that's trending within the communities and target demographic.

Your listeners know about you and you don't need people to post your news for that. They are already your listeners. What you want is someone to tell other people about you.

But you're musician's. You make music, you make noise, you have a voice. If the people that hear you think you're worth telling others about they will. If those people think you're worth telling even more people about they will. If enough people are downloading, and listening to your music you will have a following and gain traction. That's when the blogs and news posts will start picking up the scent and maybe write something about you as they try to jump on your bandwagon.

You need to develop an audience. Your music has to be what does that. THAT'S where it starts. A label won't sign you, a news site, or blogger won't write about you, nothing will happen or you until you gain a following first and foremost.

If you ran one of these blog/news sites then you can take as many DIY bands as you like. You can listen to their music, talk about the release, and offer critique of the music. Then when you receive 300 emails a day with people sending you their 7 minute terrible attempts at music thinking that it's the next big thing, we will see how long you last before you start turning people down and telling them not to send you stuff because you won't listen. We'll see how long it takes before you start introducing some qualifiers as to what music you will listen to and what you won't.

Your view of things is limited to your own existence and your own perception of being. If you start thinking about the wider picture and putting yourself into other people's shoes you might start to understand why certain marketing strategies simply won't work. You might also come up with some novel strategies that do work.

Well, I totally get your point. I heard a good saying : When you don't need the record labels any more record labels starting to want you.
But what I wanted to say, that I have a sad realisation that the Internet haven't made the things easier, and still, 99% of new releases are shitty and 1% might be worthful, but in most cases they wouldn't become known.
I used to work as a sound engineer so I can't be angry even for shitty music
#7
Quote by jerrykramskoy
If you want to get comments from like-minded people, one way is to join soundcloud.com, and then join interest groups, which you can by searching "groups" (as in interest groups) for "metal". Then share you music to these groups.

Thank you for the advice!
#8
Quote by polina.slavskaya
Well, I totally get your point. I heard a good saying : When you don't need the record labels any more record labels starting to want you.
But what I wanted to say, that I have a sad realisation that the Internet haven't made the things easier, and still, 99% of new releases are shitty and 1% might be worthful, but in most cases they wouldn't become known.
I used to work as a sound engineer so I can't be angry even for shitty music

Well the internet has made things easier in at least one respect...previously you would need to print CDs and physically distribute them. That involves cost of CDs, cost of printing, cost of shipping etc. With the internet you can distribute a song around the world yourself and it can cost you nothing (Youtube, soundcloud etc)

You are right though, because everyone has the same advantages and you're essentially competing for people's time and attention it's not actually any easier to achieve world domination.
Si
#9
Hey polina.slavskaya,

I would say that any new band should focus on two things first:
-Finishing a record (you already did that).
-Go on tour.

I think that Internet can do great things for your band nowadays, but nobody goes to Google and just type the name of your band (they don't even know it). And getting blogs to review your album is really difficult in the beginning if you don't have a good amount of followers already.

Think about this with a business mindset. For instance, how do bloggers or online music portals get money? Yes, advertising. So, if they are going to review an album that nobody is interesting in, then, there's no advertising to sell.

So, it has to be a win-win situation. Whether they write a cover story of your band that's interesting and eye-catching or they review one of your band's gig that was just outstanding, with great/crazy pictures on it (pictures are important). Those things could catch the reader's attention and thus get the website some cash by selling advertising. That's a win-win situation.

If you don't come out with a win-win situation for both, your band and the website/magazine, then you may have to work on building it. For now, I would say that you must go old-school and start touring. Even a two-week tour can help a lot to increase your audience, and they will also buy your record after the show, which they will show to their friends, who they will bring to your next show in town... you get the idea.

Once again, think about win-win situations and you'll get that review. I know you will

I hope it helps.

Cheers,

Miguel
#10
Well anyone trying to gain an audience or critical recognition needs to market hardcore, on the internet, in person, and and on stage. If anything, it's easier to reach listeners now, with only a few clicks between you and fans. But you still have to deliver when it comes to the live, personal connection that drives stuff like merchandise sales, ticket sales/turnout, and genuine fandom.

But at the end of the day, I feel music is still a face-to-face industry. Nobody will hire you for a serious gig on ReverbNation demos alone. People with connections need to know personally that you can perform and turn out a viable product before they sink their money and reputation into your band.