#1
Hi, this is another thread from Ronald Poe. I was curious about a few things. First I'd like to know the basics of Jazz soloing/soloing over Jazz Standards on bass. I think it'd be a cool skill to learn. I know about intervals, modes and stuff and can play pretty proficiently using my index finger (it's my own little technique and it works for me).

Second how do you write marches and/or evoke a march feel. I'm particularly interested in rhythms and drum parts. I'm also interested in arranging things into a wedding style and maybe even writing wedding-style pieces as well.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#3
Thanks, that looks like an interesting book. I'm looking more for general tips than anything. Speaking of which, I'm also interested in writing a waltz but ...
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#4
Quote by RonaldPoe
Hi, this is another thread from Ronald Poe. I was curious about a few things. First I'd like to know the basics of Jazz soloing/soloing over Jazz Standards on bass. I think it'd be a cool skill to learn. I know about intervals, modes and stuff and can play pretty proficiently using my index finger (it's my own little technique and it works for me).


I'd still wager you'd be better off using 2-3 fingers

The rules of soloing in jazz aren't drastically different between instruments. It's mostly about playing an improvised melody while outlining the progression with chord tones. So, you need to pay attention to the chord progression, figure out the sequence of chord tones, and play a melody around that. After you get that down, you can start expanding into some more advanced stuff, but you shouldn't use brain power for that before you actually know the basics.

Quote by RonaldPoe
I'm also interested in arranging things into a wedding style and maybe even writing wedding-style pieces as well.


Quote by RonaldPoe
Speaking of which, I'm also interested in writing a waltz but ...


Sometimes I wonder if you try too much in too little time I don't know much about waltzes in terms of form and structure, but you should have a basic grasp on classical composition techniques, and as far as I know waltzes often use a 3/4 time signature to evoke that swaying feel.

It would also help to perform analysis on waltz pieces.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#5
I guess I do try to do a lot at once. I'll try to work on chord tones and progressions. I've tried looking up the theory and for analyses on march, waltz and wedding music but haven't found much. That's why I asked the other questions. Also I know waltz uses 3/4 but what else. Sorry if I'm so persistent.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#6
you're seriously worrying about the wrong stuff if you're worrying about soloing on bass

there are so many different conventions to learn about jazz bass and you're worried about wanking
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#7
Mainly basics actually ...
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#8
Quote by RonaldPoe
Mainly basics actually ...


get some lubricant, apply to penis and stroke to completion. learn jazz before you worry about jazz soloing.

for the rest:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WL1ly1GMwwc

waltzes are easy as hell to write

accent on the 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2gnrh_LamM

this was the march we played in 8th grade, good idea of what to look for
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
Last edited by Hail at Apr 18, 2016,
#9
Quote by Hail

That drummer has no groove (if it's even played by an actual drummer, sounds a bit "programmed" to me)... If you are going to play that kind of waltz drum beat, the 2nd beat should come just a bit early. This is just way too metronomic. Waltz needs that kind of a "swinging" feel to it.

TS, in traditional waltz it's bass on "one", other instruments on "two" and "three". Bass usually alternates between the root and the fifth of the chord.

That's basically all you need. Just write a melody and you've got a waltz.

This is a traditional Finnish waltz:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yriKRVw6CQA
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Apr 19, 2016,
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
That drummer has no groove (if it's even played by an actual drummer, sounds a bit "programmed" to me)... If you are going to play that kind of waltz drum beat, the 2nd beat should come just a bit early. This is just way too metronomic. Waltz needs that kind of a "swinging" feel to it.


it was done in 1998 and all the instruments were recorded by elliott

i chose it because it was contemporary and bare bones enough to analyze

i played with a latin band with shit accordion sounds enough that your example triggered my PTSD
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.


Quote by UseYourThumb
You win. I'm done here.
#12
Is this Jazz walking bassline formula correct "root (1st beat), diatonic note (2nd beat), chromatic note (3rd beat), chromatic note (4th beat)." If not how would I approach Jazz basslines and improv?
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#13
Quote by RonaldPoe
Is this Jazz walking bassline formula correct "root (1st beat), diatonic note (2nd beat), chromatic note (3rd beat), chromatic note (4th beat)." If not how would I approach Jazz basslines and improv?



Psst.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Jazz-Bass-Book-Technique

Best,

Sean
#14
Quote by RonaldPoe
Is this Jazz walking bassline formula correct "root (1st beat), diatonic note (2nd beat), chromatic note (3rd beat), chromatic note (4th beat)." If not how would I approach Jazz basslines and improv?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruTfC5v9Z2Y

BTW, this guy has some great videos. I suggest checking out his channel.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Apr 23, 2016,
#15
Thanks to that video, I got the basics to Walking bass down. Any other basics I'd need to know for Jazz bass. I already know intervals and stuff. I guess I should think about learning a good ole Jazz standard.

Still curious about March rhythms though ...
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).